sale barn Tulsa Ok.

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Anonymous

I set in the sale barn today, just to watch and learn..last monday also.Set next to and talked with several different cattle raisers, but mostly ask questions and listened..They have a different twist about them , than the folks at home in Tennessee, good people thought.. The old boy I talked most with,last week and this one also, likes bigs cows any breed but seems to favor a black baldies not nesserily angus blacks.. Breeds to a polled Home Black Limms. bulls. His point was easy to see, watch them blacks they bring the most money. Calfs of equal weights Blacks the most $ and Brahmas the least by at least 20 cents a lbs. every thing else in the middle some where.. Oh except the longhorn calfs and cows the 10 or so pairs and dozen or so calf went cheap, real cheap. The cow boy types bought them up to bull dog and rope, or so one of the Longhorn buyers told me that was what he was going to do with them..

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Anonymous

Sounds like you got some good info and insights at the sale barn! True, Longhorns don't bring much at sale barn. Quality Longhorns are never taken to the sale barn (other than ropers) unless it's an owner distress sale or they're selling stock not suited for their breeding program (with one or more conformation or attitude defects). Vast majority of Longhorns (almost always the quality ones) are sold via private treaty, via networking, or over the internet, or at special Longhorn Auctions.

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Anonymous

Welcome to Oklahoma. Hope you enjoyed your visit. Fifteen/twenty years ago, Oklahoma was Limousin country. We came back home in '83 and the county was full of red Limis. Beautiful animals. Maybe the best looking bull I've ever seen was a red Limi bull. But today, they are almost all black. We had a very bad experience with Limi heifers that kept us from going that direction, thank goodness. How do Longhorms sell in Tennessee?

> I set in the sale barn today, just
> to watch and learn..last monday
> also.Set next to and talked with
> several different cattle raisers,
> but mostly ask questions and
> listened..They have a different
> twist about them , than the folks
> at home in Tennessee, good people
> thought.. The old boy I talked
> most with,last week and this one
> also, likes bigs cows any breed
> but seems to favor a black baldies
> not nesserily angus blacks..
> Breeds to a polled Home Black
> Limms. bulls. His point was easy
> to see, watch them blacks they
> bring the most money. Calfs of
> equal weights Blacks the most $
> and Brahmas the least by at least
> 20 cents a lbs. every thing else
> in the middle some where.. Oh
> except the longhorn calfs and cows
> the 10 or so pairs and dozen or so
> calf went cheap, real cheap. The
> cow boy types bought them up to
> bull dog and rope, or so one of
> the Longhorn buyers told me that
> was what he was going to do with
> them..
 
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Anonymous

You see very few Longhorns in Tennessee, the one you see are only pretty to look at type thing...I do not want to bad mouth the Longhorns, because with genetics they may have a place, also small birth weights.But my gut s tell me they are a novity just like buffole,ostriges,beffole,sorry for the spelling...A guy at home has three hugh longhorn steers, damn they are beautiful. He uses them as lawn mowers, good beef type would do the same.. The bottom line is money does not care how it is spent, and when it belongs to someone else, I tell my self it is his money to waste....Alf... But if I had a little extre money and alittle spare grass Longhorns are beautiful, and I can see myself having a few...ALF

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Anonymous

> Longhorns in Tennessee are becoming more plentiful-maybe they are a novelty to some but I'm starting to get calls for Longhorn bulls to breed to first calf heifers. Some folks are getting tired of pulling big calves and losing their heifers from being bred to large birth weight bulls. Our local Texas Longhorn affiliate just had our annual Field Day on Memorial Day weekend and we had a Charolais breeder to attend. They came up to me and asked how do we work our cattle and I told them that compared to the Charolais heifers that I have I work my Longhorns a whole lot easier. Then I asked them what do they breed their first calf heifers to and they said Charolais of course but then they also admitted that the first five calves born to heifers had to be pulled. They also admitted that they lose about 10% of their calves and heifers to birthing. Now I may be wrong but I'd rather have a half Longhorn calf to sell in the fall than a dead one in the ditch.
 
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Anonymous

Well Roger, lets see, agree a half longhorn,is better than a dead calf.. I have argued for the longhorn, Small birth weights, genetic diveristy, beautiful animals, but really as history shows not a very good beef animal..although through selection they may be improved. The problem there as I see it is They (longhorn breederd) are breed for horns, while the whole time talking how great the meat is. Your point about longhorn use on heifers, well maybe the people that are breeding the 15 mo. heifers would be better off breeding at 20 mo. Prehaps they should use Black Angus Bulls because of the EPD's avabily, I know that would solve their heifer problems. I believe there are enought smallbirth weight Black Angus Bulls to solve a lot of the cattle breeder problems ...I am not saying Black Angus are the best only that there are so much data that they are THE BEST TO USE. As for you question half longhorn vs. dead animal, I bet in nearly feed lot and sale barn in the country would reather have a half BLACK ANGUS calf than anything else....alf

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Anonymous

> Alf, I'm sure that you are right about the feed lots preferring Black Angus-at least it seems that's what most people use. And I believe that there are Black Angus bulls that will produce low birth weight calves. We used to use Angus bulls and the calves were small at birth. Now it seems that so many so called Angus are maybe now what they seem-what I mean is maybe they're not all Angus. There's a guy in our town who breeds registered Black Angus-my vet was telling me that he was going to refer this guy to us for a bull to breed his heifers to because this guy has had to pull so many and lost several calves this past year from his new Angus bull on his first calf heifers. I sold a Longhorn bull recently to a guy to breed his Black and Red Angus heifers to. I'm not an Angus man so I don't really know alot about them but I'm thinking maybe there's been outside blood added to these so called Angus for size??? As for the beefiness of the Longhorns-I have some pretty beefy type registered ones. I have bull form the Yates line that is very beefy (and by the way this line isn't known for having large or very long horns). I use this bull to add beefiness to some of my Longhorn calves and I also use him on my beef herd of Beefmaster, Beefalo and Charolais cows. This bull is black and white and throws alot of black calves when bred to my solid color beef cows. All of his solid black bull calves brought top dollar at the sale barn last year. They brought the same per pound as my dad's black Gelbvieh cross calves (who by the way has had to pull several this year and lost some too). What I think is funny about my black Longhorn cross calves is that I bet they wound up selling as Black Angus beef to the packers. If that's what happened I think that's hilarious because they don't have a drop of Angus in them. Bet their beef was as good or better though because they don't have all that wasted fat.
 
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Anonymous

All of our heifers calf at 23 to 24 months and they are what a lot of people consider pretty small. 950 - 1050 as mature cows. We haven't pulled a calf in years. Using the tools available (EPDs with high Accuracy) will prevent 99.9% of the need for assistance at calving. Unfortunely the bull is only part of the equation. If the heifer is very growthy and is geneticly predisposed to throw large calves you may still have problems. Common sense and good judgment are vital. But as has been said before "The unfortunate thing asbout common sense is that it is so uncommon"

dun
 

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