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Twin Bull

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Anonymous

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I recently looked at a bull and even though he was a very pretty yearling, I was a little hesitant to purchase him due to the fact that he was a twin (the other calf was a heifer). I have been told that he will not sire more twins than normal but his heifers would. My question is, why are twins considered "not good"? Is it due to the birthing problems that may be encountered?

Thanks

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OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
The Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) ran a long study of twinning in beef cattle. They even went so far as to produce a line of bulls whose daughters were more likely to twin. Their semen was sold by ABS as MARC Twinners. But at the end of the study, they found beef cows who had twin calves had twice as much calving difficulty as single births, had a considerably slower breed back rate and didn't wean considerably more pounds of beef. And, of course, a heifer born to a bull twin will not be fertile, so that could be a loss if you are breeding purebred animals.

> I recently looked at a bull and
> even though he was a very pretty
> yearling, I was a little hesitant
> to purchase him due to the fact
> that he was a twin (the other calf
> was a heifer). I have been told
> that he will not sire more twins
> than normal but his heifers would.
> My question is, why are twins
> considered "not good"?
> Is it due to the birthing problems
> that may be encountered?

> Thanks

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Do to the commingling of blood before birth the fertility of the bull twin is reduced. This only applies if the heifer twin is a freemartin. If you do a google search on "freemartin twinning" there are a number of intersting reports on twinning.

dunmovin farms

> The Meat Animal Research Center
> (MARC) ran a long study of
> twinning in beef cattle. They even
> went so far as to produce a line
> of bulls whose daughters were more
> likely to twin. Their semen was
> sold by ABS as MARC Twinners. But
> at the end of the study, they
> found beef cows who had twin
> calves had twice as much calving
> difficulty as single births, had a
> considerably slower breed back
> rate and didn't wean considerably
> more pounds of beef. And, of
> course, a heifer born to a bull
> twin will not be fertile, so that
> could be a loss if you are
> breeding purebred animals.
 

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