Dunmovin Advise Me Please

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Anonymous

I live a bit further North in the Ozarks than Dun, and we have about 6" of snow on the ground today.

This late morning, around 10:30am I had a Black Cow give birth to a nice B/W hwffer. I arrived back from town to see the calf trying to get on it's front feet ant the momma licking it's head. The calf never rose it's hind Quarters. There were two other two or maybe three week old calves in the same pasture and they were bothering momma, as they were curious about what was going on. I checked a little later and mom had passed the afterbirth and was chomping at that and also watching the baby heffer and occasionally licking it's forehead. There was a Large Grey Coyotte or Wolf in the pasture too, about about the size of a good sized Golden Retreiver, and pure Grey. It was within about 10 feet of momma, and when it saw me it headed towards the woods.

About 40 min later Calf was motionless in the pasture, but momma was still standing guard. I drove out there and Picked it up, leaving momma very un-happy, but the calf, after about 10 min in my truck, started to move a bit, still too weak to hold it's head up, and fully still wet and very cold.

It's now in my bathroom, (The only heated small enclousure I have) and the calf has still not gotten up, but is holding it's head up about 70% of the time. I have towled it off, and also offered it a bottle with colostrum replacer, and it did take about one cup of that and then wanted to rest. I came in here to send off this message.

Can I safely keep it over-night in the bathroom and still have momma accept it tomorrow? I suspect it will be way too cold for it outside tonight as we are suggested to go to about 10 degrees and at 1:45pm it still is not up on it's feet.

Any other suggestions?

Eaglewerks

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Anonymous

> Until Dun can send an answer- Heres my 2 bits, If you have a place to run momma into for a bit till the little one is better, maybe milk her out and get her colostrum to give to the baby, I would. then you can reunite the 2 together in a smaller area for a bit. But,yes, I believe it should be fine to keep new one inside over nite. continue the colostrum, and briskly rub him all over with a warm towel to get him blood flowing. This is what I would do. Im sure by tomorrow he will be trying to get up. When steady on feet, move out with mom. Maybe keep the two confined for a day or 2 to make sure hes nursing good. I know youre waiting for Duns answer, but till then, this is what I would do. And- keep a gun in the truck for the coyote/wolf to scare off!!

I live a bit further North in the
> Ozarks than Dun, and we have about
> 6" of snow on the ground
> today.

> This late morning, around 10:30am
> I had a Black Cow give birth to a
> nice B/W hwffer. I arrived back
> from town to see the calf trying
> to get on it's front feet ant the
> momma licking it's head. The calf
> never rose it's hind Quarters.
> There were two other two or maybe
> three week old calves in the same
> pasture and they were bothering
> momma, as they were curious about
> what was going on. I checked a
> little later and mom had passed
> the afterbirth and was chomping at
> that and also watching the baby
> heffer and occasionally licking
> it's forehead. There was a Large
> Grey Coyotte or Wolf in the
> pasture too, about about the size
> of a good sized Golden Retreiver,
> and pure Grey. It was within about
> 10 feet of momma, and when it saw
> me it headed towards the woods.

> About 40 min later Calf was
> motionless in the pasture, but
> momma was still standing guard. I
> drove out there and Picked it up,
> leaving momma very un-happy, but
> the calf, after about 10 min in my
> truck, started to move a bit,
> still too weak to hold it's head
> up, and fully still wet and very
> cold.

> It's now in my bathroom, (The only
> heated small enclousure I have)
> and the calf has still not gotten
> up, but is holding it's head up
> about 70% of the time. I have
> towled it off, and also offered it
> a bottle with colostrum replacer,
> and it did take about one cup of
> that and then wanted to rest. I
> came in here to send off this
> message.

> Can I safely keep it over-night in
> the bathroom and still have momma
> accept it tomorrow? I suspect it
> will be way too cold for it
> outside tonight as we are
> suggested to go to about 10
> degrees and at 1:45pm it still is
> not up on it's feet.

> Any other suggestions?

> Eaglewerks
 
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Anonymous

There are tonly a couple things I would do different. I would milk the cow out and tube the chlostorum into the calf. The longer you wait the less effective it will be in providing both anti--bodies and nutrition. Don t scare the coyote, kill it! If you have a shed or something that you can get the calf and mom both into and provide a heatlamp that would be best, but barring that, keep her in the BR and keep her warm not too warm and get the milk into her. ormally as long as the calf is getting the milk from it's own mom she will claim it, I think she smells herself in the calf and it's bowel movements. If you have any other questions e-mail me direct, you've got the address.

dun

> I live a bit further North in the
 
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Anonymous

I got the calf dried, and after a while onto it's feet, though very wobbly. I got it to take about a Quart of colostrom Replacer (the suggested amount is 2 Qts) and then it wanted no more. It was starting to attempt to bond, so I grabbed it, fought off the dogs and threw it into the truck cab. I took it out back into the feeding area and grabbed a couple of bales of alfalfa. One I flaked off for the incomming cows...the other I piled into a pile and put the calf down in the middle of the pile. It's aunts and Uncles all were interested, but it's momma did not want anything to do with the calf. Would not even smell it as it walked up to her. The Calf "adopted" a steer..and I was exasperated.

The cows finished feeding, and they all went into the pasture, and I walked out into the pasture and abducted the calf from the steer. I carried it towards it's momma once again, and I was becomming exhausted and having trouble breathing....I started to go down, and I shoved the calf out into front of me so I would not fall on it. It landed on the snow in the pasture, "slpat" and I went down to my knees..."Momma" saw all this and came running to the flattened calf in the field, as it "Finally" Looked like hers (remember, she had last seen it laying motionless in the pasture). Calf got up and tried to adopt momma, but she was not sure, but she was willing to let the calf finally stand beside her...it went towards the milk and momma was un-sure but did finally let it suckle. Last seen calf was resting in a pile of hay I un-rolled into that pasture and momma was standing and grazing within a few feet.

I need to thaw my feet, take a nap, and then grab a cup of morning coffee (which I missed), but Shoot! it's already 5:20pm here, so I gues I will settle with thawing my feet.

Eaglewerks



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Anonymous

Glad to hear all is oing well(?). I'm always paranoid the first couple of hours till thigs match up and settle in.

dun

> I got the calf dried, and after a
> while onto it's feet, though very
> wobbly. I got it to take about a
> Quart of colostrom Replacer (the
> suggested amount is 2 Qts) and
> then it wanted no more. It was
> starting to attempt to bond, so I
> grabbed it, fought off the dogs
> and threw it into the truck cab. I
> took it out back into the feeding
> area and grabbed a couple of bales
> of alfalfa. One I flaked off for
> the incomming cows...the other I
> piled into a pile and put the calf
> down in the middle of the pile.
> It's aunts and Uncles all were
> interested, but it's momma did not
> want anything to do with the calf.
> Would not even smell it as it
> walked up to her. The Calf
> "adopted" a steer..and I
> was exasperated.

> The cows finished feeding, and
> they all went into the pasture,
> and I walked out into the pasture
> and abducted the calf from the
> steer. I carried it towards it's
> momma once again, and I was
> becomming exhausted and having
> trouble breathing....I started to
> go down, and I shoved the calf out
> into front of me so I would not
> fall on it. It landed on the snow
> in the pasture, "slpat"
> and I went down to my
> knees..."Momma" saw all
> this and came running to the
> flattened calf in the field, as it
> "Finally" Looked like
> hers (remember, she had last seen
> it laying motionless in the
> pasture). Calf got up and tried to
> adopt momma, but she was not sure,
> but she was willing to let the
> calf finally stand beside her...it
> went towards the milk and momma
> was un-sure but did finally let it
> suckle. Last seen calf was resting
> in a pile of hay I un-rolled into
> that pasture and momma was
> standing and grazing within a few
> feet.

> I need to thaw my feet, take a
> nap, and then grab a cup of
> morning coffee (which I missed),
> but Shoot! it's already 5:20pm
> here, so I gues I will settle with
> thawing my feet.

> Eaglewerks
 
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Anonymous

> Glad to hear all is oing well(?).
> I'm always paranoid the first
> couple of hours till thigs match
> up and settle in.

> dun i also live in missouri..but i thought and i may be wrong.. that we eradicated wolves long ago...2 cents....also i have never seen a grey cyote..mostly red or redish/brown color? the grey makes me wonder?do we have wolves again?

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Anonymous

Most of the coyotes I've seen are brownish. I don't thik there are ay wolves left, I hope. In the desert every once in a while we'ld see a coyote of a totally strange color, we laid to what used be be called coydogs. Hybreds of coyotes and dogs. There was one pack that had a collie running with it for a couple of years. But coyotes come in all colors, I've seen a silvery lookig one runing through the back pasture, but I think that was as much light conditions as anything. My preferred marking for coyotes is a big red spot! What part of MO are you in? BTW, last summer someone up in northern MO did shoot a wolve, thought it was a coyote. It had a radio collar on and was from Minnesota.

dun
 
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Anonymous

> In the 70's my sister had a prof. that was working with the Mo dept of cons. they sent him heads and he tossed them in tubs of sawdust and mealworms to clean the skulls. Then he would inspect the suture lines in the skull to see if it was a coyote, dog, or a cross, one of the crosses looked like a wolf,hybird vigor-it was big!
 
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Anonymous

dun i live in the st.louis area but our familly farm (since 1830 or so) is about 12 miles noth of doniphan ,mo. in se/sc/ missouri.. about a half mile off the current river.

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Anonymous

This is post facto reply after reading all the others. Black cow? Angus? Anyway, had a slightly similar experience with one of my Longhorns last year...had a sudden cold, sleet morning, noticed one of my cows had calved about 1/2 hour earlier...others standing around, mother licking slightly wet and lifeless calf. We picked it up promptly, took into house, warmed it up till it was wanting to run around in about 30 min. or so. Took it back to mama and she immediately accepted it and it started nursing shortly after. Moral to this story...when you discover a new calf that is cold, immediately warm it up. Other moral...when cow is expected to calve, on bad weather period, watch her every few hours to monitor birth progress. Act promptly as needed. Incidentally, Longhorns, expecially the quality registered ones, have "bad" traits culled out and above that, Longhorn Cows are excellent milkers, mothers, AND, Longhorns are great predator controllers...they will keep coyotes, dogs, wolves, cats, and others away.... :)

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Anonymous

I live south of Stockton Mo. The places here are mostly older, have become overgrown with trees, and also are mostly smaller in size, though there are some larger landholders that have piece together original smaller parcels. I would suspect the normal place here is between 20 acres and 120 acres, with 40 acres being average in size. My place is now only 20 acres, was 40acres since the 1920's, and recently split. I am only the third owner since the Civil War, and I cannot trace it back further than that. My place was originally an 80 acre parcel in the Civil War era.

I have about a 9 acre rear woodlot, that sides up to a neighbors 10 acre one, and backs into another neighbors 15 acre one. It is just a field away from another another wooded area of say 200 acres, in either direction. Essentially this area is wooded with pastures dotting the landscape if viewed from the air, and no longer fuly cleared grazing lands.

We have, or the the neighboring ranchers have spootted: Cougars (scarce), Wolves (the Big grey one has been spotted by three of my neighbors), Coyotes that are also grey colored, Foxes, Racoones, Skunks, Bald Eagles (this is a nesting area for them), Egrets, Lots of Deer, and lots of poisionus snakes. You can hear the coyotes, and sometimes wolves howling most every evening.

Eaglewerks



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