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Jafruech

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My pics didn't attach for some reason. Trying again. Attached are a couple pictures from the summer. Calves and cows are just on pasture with some mineral.

1. 5.5 mo old steer and his Dam (dam is 50% LH 50% Angus, Steer is 75% ANG / 25% LH20200728_175156.jpg

2. 7.5 mo old heifer and her dam (dam a first calf heifer and is 50% LH 50% Angus, Steer is 75% ANG / 25% LH
20200728_174403.jpg

Happy to include some better pictures of the cows if you're interested.
 

RockinRB

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My pics didn't attach for some reason. Trying again. Attached are a couple pictures from the summer. Calves and cows are just on pasture with some mineral.

1. 5.5 mo old steer and his Dam (dam is 50% LH 50% Angus, Steer is 75% ANG / 25% LHView attachment 600

2. 7.5 mo old heifer and her dam (dam a first calf heifer and is 50% LH 50% Angus, Steer is 75% ANG / 25% LH
View attachment 601

Happy to include some better pictures of the cows if you're interested.
I sure like those. And they'll raise a big calf for a lot of years.
 
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I LOVE My red angus’ ..... Cows plop out big thick boned babies with little to no effort, their babies know their mammas. ( I’ve had charolais calves who don’t Know who the hell their mom is), red babies latch onto tear’ within minutes, cows breed back early, are super calm and gentle minded and also great to look at.
what else do you need?
 

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I want to breed a charolais to my longhorns, I'm not keeping any heifers out of the longhorns I don't think. I can buy 2 longhorn cows for what I can raise one longhorn x heifer. I just have the longhorns because they were cheap and I can make a buck on them, will probably buy some more to put on my new place to help clean it up as well as some brahman heifers, now I want to save heifers out of the brahmans so I'll either breed the brahman heifers to the ultra black or AI them to herefords to retain heifers. I don't really think I want charolais x brahman cows as they will be fairly large and I want moderate framed cattle long term.
Question: how in the world do u get Longhorns in a squeeze chute to vaccinate?
 

Little Joe

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Question: how in the world do u get Longhorns in a squeeze chute to vaccinate?

I've done it, just as Kenny said don't rush them and they know how to maneuver those horns through. But in general my longhorns don't need worked, they don't get sick and are not wormy. Their immune system is better than most cattle because most people never work them, they just turn them out and let them be. I do work the calves. The calves are half breeds so either no horn or very little so not a problem. I've got a set up now on my new sweep where the longhorns can be penned between 2 gates and worked if need be and don't have to go down the chute. Mine are super gentle, you could almost work them in the pasture if you had to if you had a way to keep them from slinging their horns around.
 

Jafruech

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I agree with what Little Joe said 100%. People who have never had LHs and LH Xs don't understand just how easy and pleasurable it is to raise them. Even the ones that only have 12.5% LH in them still show a huge difference. I select Angus and Hereford bulls that compliment and enhance the LH traits for my xbred stock. I will however give all the cows boosters once a year before calving so they pass some of it onto the calves that are half breed. It doesn't cost much and I use low stress handling and stockmanship. I don't own a hot shot and have no interest in buying them. LHs are smart. They remember. Use good stockmanship and a 5 year old can sort them on the ground (and mine does).

I have a pearson XL parallel squeeze with the manual headgate. LHs can easily turn their horns and get in. However I would like to add that the "Bry LH chute" works really well too.

If you have ever run LHs or LH crosses with good genetics and the right bulls you'll never run anything else.
 

DCA farm

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Question: how in the world do u get Longhorns in a squeeze chute to vaccinatetry
Question: how in the world do u get Longhorns in a squeeze chute to vaccinate?
Some of mine have long horns just gotta be slow and easy with them I like to have my horns cut
 

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smoothmule

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A person can and should breed what they love. But one needs to realize that other people may not love them. And the further you go from the main stream the narrower the market becomes.
That has never been a problem with the low volume I raise. I currently have more people wanting calves than I can keep up with
at least you can enjoy losing money!
lol. My calves bring half again as much as the ones that sell at the local sale barns
 
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smoothmule

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Lol. I love the conversation going on here and the cattle posted. Lots of reasons to love a particular type. My goals have panned out beautifully. Even those in my area that were strictly for commercial or purebred breeders have seen the benefits I’ve been breeding for. The ultimate goal for me are cows that “I” love, gorgeous, great temperament, long lived easy keepers that deliver and raise their calves with no issues that do it all on grass, salt and minerals and grain/feed is generally treats. I can choose Any good Registered bull and produce calves that are tiny when born, grow fast and type is like any good commercial calf if not better.

Many of my neighbors have seen what I’m doing and want a few heifers to crossbreed. My opinion is that a Good calf is a good calf, no matter the breed or cross. My heifers will never need to go to a sale barn, they sell for half again as much as sale barn calves and are sought after for cross breeding
 
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smoothmule

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I also have sold bull calves as herd sires and I get a lot of great feedback. I know mine are not registered, or even a “breed” but I sometimes get outstanding bull calves and I have my vet do a thorough breeding exam before I’ll sell as a bull. They are slower to mature but they are breeding years after other bulls are done and the hybrid vigor shows in the calves.

Before I got into Gyr crosses, I’ve personally used Registered bulls that produced health or breeding issues and found out from my vet that the issues were genetic, through the bull I rented. All breeds have “issues” of some sort. I can say I breed for health and vigor, I’ve never lost a calf or adult to illness.
 

Warren Allison

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Some of the best brood cows I ever had, are some I would have never sought out to buy.. I just got them on some trades. About '94 or so, I met this man when he called about a Mammoth Jack I had for sale. He had Belgians and Percherons, and was into draft horse competitions, and wanted to raise some draft mules. When I delivered the jack, he had this pair of oxen, half Holstein and half Chianina, that I swear stood 17 hds easy at the top of their shoulder! He hauled these to the draft horse pulls., too. Evidently, they have classes for oxen at these shows, too. He kept 5-6 Holstein cows that he AI'ed to a Chianina bull every year, and 6 registered Chianina cows he bred to a Holstein bull every year, to get these steers he could raise to be competition oxen, or sell to others that competed. That first year I met him, and every year til 2009, except 2, I would get his heifers from this cross. They would just look like giant Holsteins when they grew up, same black & white color and patterns that Holsteins had, just a little beefier. I would breed these heifers to an Angus bull 1st time, and Brangus bulls the rest of the time, and always got black, polled claves. Once or twice a heifer had some white on their udder, and a calf or two had a white foot or maybe a star. The steers did well at the sale, as good as Angus or black baldie steers did, just a LOT bigger at weaning. And the heifers sold well as as replacements. Or, sometimes I'd sell then as a pair with their first calves, which were sired by Angus or Brangus. These Hol-Chi cross cows were very heat and insect resistant, and would eat all summer in the middle of the day. They were excellent mommas, and of course, had plenty of milk. The cows didn't sell so well however, when it became time to do so. they'd bring about what any older. milked -out Holstein cow would bring. Never had a one of them have any trouble calving, and never had one get sick.
 

Muddy

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Some of the best brood cows I ever had, are some I would have never sought out to buy.. I just got them on some trades. About '94 or so, I met this man when he called about a Mammoth Jack I had for sale. He had Belgians and Percherons, and was into draft horse competitions, and wanted to raise some draft mules. When I delivered the jack, he had this pair of oxen, half Holstein and half Chianina, that I swear stood 17 hds easy at the top of their shoulder! He hauled these to the draft horse pulls., too. Evidently, they have classes for oxen at these shows, too. He kept 5-6 Holstein cows that he AI'ed to a Chianina bull every year, and 6 registered Chianina cows he bred to a Holstein bull every year, to get these steers he could raise to be competition oxen, or sell to others that competed. That first year I met him, and every year til 2009, except 2, I would get his heifers from this cross. They would just look like giant Holsteins when they grew up, same black & white color and patterns that Holsteins had, just a little beefier. I would breed these heifers to an Angus bull 1st time, and Brangus bulls the rest of the time, and always got black, polled claves. Once or twice a heifer had some white on their udder, and a calf or two had a white foot or maybe a star. The steers did well at the sale, as good as Angus or black baldie steers did, just a LOT bigger at weaning. And the heifers sold well as as replacements. Or, sometimes I'd sell then as a pair with their first calves, which were sired by Angus or Brangus. These Hol-Chi cross cows were very heat and insect resistant, and would eat all summer in the middle of the day. They were excellent mommas, and of course, had plenty of milk. The cows didn't sell so well however, when it became time to do so. they'd bring about what any older. milked -out Holstein cow would bring. Never had a one of them have any trouble calving, and never had one get sick.
Did these Chi x Hol cows have big udders or just good sized udders?
 

Warren Allison

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Later on that year, this client took a notion to try to breed bucking bulls. PBR was coming on strong in the mid-90’s, and he decided he wanted to create his own 3-way cross of Brahman, Longhorn, and Chianina cattle to get bucking bulls out of. He bought about 20 Longhorn cows, and a bull, as well as about 20 Brahma cows and a bull. He bred half of the Longhorn cows to his Brahman, the other half to his Chianina. Same with the Brahma cows… half to the Longhorn and half to the Chianina. Starting that year, he no longer bred his 6 Chianina cows to the Holstein (but still bred his Holstein cows to the Chianin a bull) , but bred 3 to the LH and 3 to the Brahman. That year and the next, he kept is Holstein x Chiania heifers, and used them in the breeding program in the same capacity as the reg. Chianina. After a couple of years, he’d take the 2-way crosses…LH x Br, LH x Chi, and Chi x Br, breed them to a purebred of the 3rd breed ( LH x Br to a Chianina, for instance) and get a 3-way cross that was ½ x1/4 x1/4. These 3 -way crosses were bred back to each other( He had kept all his bull calves intact, and any of the bulls that ended up bucking...he’d use them for breeding), and by 2000 or so had a pretty uniform type of cattle, either 3/8 x 3/8 x ¼, or 5/16 x 5/16 x 3/16ths . About 2002 or so, he got to AI-ing his cattle to champion NFR and PBR bulls, as well as his own that bucked well.

About 1998 or so, when he had about 3 years worth of the 2-way crosses, he started selling off his Longhorns and Brahmans, and a couple of years later, he started selling off most of his 2-way crosses. I bought some of the LH X Br cows, and ended up with about 10-12. The rest, I sold every year to a partner in Fla who bred Brahman-cross cattle. He used Brangus, Braford, Santa Gertrudis, Charbray, and Beefmaster bulls. These cows did phenomenally for him. No calving problems, heat, humidity and insects didn’t bother them, and they were excellent momma cows, with ample milk. The ones I kept, I bred them to an angus bull. The calves were polled, black, and looked about like a Brangus. The steers sold for top dollar, as well as any angus or black baldy does around here. The heifers sold very well, as either open replacements, or as a pair with calf at its side. The heifers I kept, I bred back to Angus bulls. When it came time to sell those ugly Br x LH cows, however, they wouldn’t bring hardly anything.



The Chi- LH cows, I sold to the partner in Florida. They did as well as the LH-x Br cows in his operation, only raised a LOT bigger claves. I ended up keeping 3 of these, and I bred them to a Brangus each year. The calves were all black, and polled, and looked like Chi-Angus with a touch of ear. Again, the steers brought top dollar, as did the heifers, but the cows...not so much. These cows were near as big as the Chianina parent, but with more color on them than a pure Chianina…kinda depended on the coloration of the LH parent. Most had some horn, but not as much as you might think.



The Chi x Br cows, were probably my favorite of the 2-way crosses. I bought all of them he would sell each year, having as many as 20 at any one time. These cows were as big as a purebred Chianina…colored the same… and no where near as much ear or leather as you might think, being half Brahma. I chose to breed them with some of my neighbor’s registered polled Charolais bulls. This area is not very big on Charolais, like a lot of places.. “ Black is Best”, etc. but Holy Hand Grenades, Batman!! These cows would stand in the middle of a pasture, at high noon, July and August, and eat like they were starving to death! They did not get sick. They had ZERO calving problems. They were the best mommas, and produced a LOT of milk. Nursing those big ole Charolais calves never pulled a pound off of these cows. The calves came out white, polled, with just a hint of ear. I swear, if you wanted to sit out in the pasture and watch them all day, you could virtually see them growing. I am sure the steers got docked per pound, for being white, but heck, you could wean them at 6 mos, and they’d be 100-200 lbs bigger than the other commercial steers coming through the sale were at 8-9 months. The heifers, though, sold VERY well as replacement heifers... both open or bred… or as bred 1st and 2nd-calf cows, or pairs, or 3 way deals. When those heifers were mature cows, they’d be as big as a Chianina, and looked like basically, giant Charolais. The ones I kept I always bred back to Charolais, and again...not one calving problem, ever. When it came time to sell those Chi x Br cows, ( when they didn’t breed back on time, or at all) they’d bring about the same as an older culled Charolais would. But man those heifers sold like they were made of gold! I would always take a copy of the Brahma and Chianina grandparents’ papers, and a copy of the Charolais bull’s papers to give to the buyers. Of course, none of these papers meant a thing… no one at the sales knew much, if anything, about the Chianina or Brahma bloodlines…. and maybe 1 or 2 might recognize a Charolais name. But the fact that these records were kept, made the commercial cow-calf farmers pay top-dollar for them. If I took any bred, or with a heifer calf by their side, I’d also include that bull’s papers as well.

One year, I bred 2 of the Chi x Br cows to an Angus and 2 to a Brangus (got 4 smoky steers out of them, and they sold as well as any other non- black did), 2 to a Gert bull ( got a bull and heifer, they looked just like the Gert, only a lot taller, and a lighter red. Left the bull intact til I weaned and sold him, because that’s what the buyer that got him and the heifer wanted), and bred 2 to a Simmental and 2 to a Hereford. All 4 of them were heifers. Back then, Simmentals were still red and white, and those 2 heifers looked like the popular (at the time) Simm x Charolais. The 2 Hereford cross heifers looked like any other Hereford x Charolais, only bigger. Man that bought them had Angus bulls and raised some fine black baldy heifers out of them and the Simm cross heifers.

If I were still in the cow business today,, even with me being a huge Angus/Brangus/ Chi-angus fan, and not all that big a Charolais fan, I’d take a pasture full of those Chi x Br cows any day. And, I’d still breed them to Charolais bulls. If not Charolais, then Hereford bulls...and I am not all that big a Hereford fan either.
 
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I agree with what Little Joe said 100%. People who have never had LHs and LH Xs don't understand just how easy and pleasurable it is to raise them. Even the ones that only have 12.5% LH in them still show a huge difference. I select Angus and Hereford bulls that compliment and enhance the LH traits for my xbred stock. I will however give all the cows boosters once a year before calving so they pass some of it onto the calves that are half breed. It doesn't cost much and I use low stress handling and stockmanship. I don't own a hot shot and have no interest in buying them. LHs are smart. They remember. Use good stockmanship and a 5 year old can sort them on the ground (and mine does).

I have a pearson XL parallel squeeze with the manual headgate. LHs can easily turn their horns and get in. However I would like to add that the "Bry LH chute" works really well too.

If you have ever run LHs or LH crosses with good genetics and the right bulls you'll never run anything else.
That is incredible and with all of u saying same thing — I believe Longhorns are gentle ....we’ve always wondered when we pass by a pasture of them. I LOVE all the gorgeous colors!
 
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