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Ky hills

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That is incredible and with all of u saying same thing — I believe Longhorns are gentle ....we’ve always wondered when we pass by a pasture of them. I LOVE all the gorgeous colors!
Longhorns are like any other cattle in that some are gentle and some aren’t. We currently have a couple, they are gentle but these are definitely not cows to mess with when they first calve. I have seen some that are pretty flighty which could get dangerous fast with those horns. There used to be a field of them up the road from us, and one morning a cow was out and had come up in our yard across the fence from some of our cattle. A passerby and myself tried to get her through a gate in the barn lot to hold her so they could get her. That plan fell apart pretty quick we couldn’t even get her contained to get anywhere near a gate. She saw us and was determined to run by. Later that day the owners roped and got her on a trailer with horses.
 

Warren Allison

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Longhorns are like any other cattle in that some are gentle and some aren’t. We currently have a couple, they are gentle but these are definitely not cows to mess with when they first calve. I have seen some that are pretty flighty which could get dangerous fast with those horns. There used to be a field of them up the road from us, and one morning a cow was out and had come up in our yard across the fence from some of our cattle. A passerby and myself tried to get her through a gate in the barn lot to hold her so they could get her. That plan fell apart pretty quick we couldn’t even get her contained to get anywhere near a gate. She saw us and was determined to run by. Later that day the owners roped and got her on a trailer with horses.
You are absolutely correct. I have had a lot of them through the years. I have found them to be, as a whole, no more flighty or aggressive than any other cattle. Even had a bull one time, that you could ride! The thing about them is, their horns. Basic physics applying to the mechanical advantage of a lever applies. I have had some that figured this out, and could use their horns to lift the heaviest corral panels you can buy, and walk under them. They can take down any kind of wire fence, if they choose, using those horns like a crow bar. They are very atheletic, and can jump like a deer...stand flat footed and clear a 5' 6" fence without touching the top wire or boards. I had a client that raised cutting horses, that bought some buffalo to train them with. In the early 80's . when the Texas oil industry collapsed,, you could buy drill pipe and sucker rods for next to nothing. He bought several truck loads of this, and built corrals and working pens out of it, 6'6" to 7' high. These held the bison well, and later on in the late 80's when he got Longhorn cattle, these facilities were ideal. Never had one tear out of., or jump over, any of these fences. They are also extremely fast! Booger Barter used to put a LH steer in his famous truck ropings. He'd wrap the horns in glitter and ribbons, and if you caught that "prize steer" in a certain time, then you got a $10k bonus. I went to several Booger Barter ropings, and I never saw a heading horse that could catch one in the time allowed! Like others have said, if you let them take their time, they can maneuver their horns through your chutes and head gates. But, if you push them.. get them mad or nervous or scared, they will just take off with your chute or head gate on their horns, hauling ass across the pasture! Great thing is, LH do not get sick much, and aren't bothered by insects as much, so you don't have to work them a lot. Hell, since they have created black-every-kind-of-cow-there-is...even black Charolais, I am told.... they might create a polled Longhorn!! If they did, probably none of you would have anything else!
 

Ky hills

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Hell, since they have created black-every-kind-of-cow-there-is...even black Charolais, I am told.... they might create a polled Longhorn!! If they did, probably none of you would have anything else!
I have read a while back an outfit has been crossing LH’s with red Angus, and breeding for solid red polled cattle. I could see using a cross like that as a heifer bull. I do agree that LH cattle have some good qualities that many mainstream breeds are loosing, however the fact still remains that they are slower growing and lighter weight thus probably not going to ever be accepted for mainstream usage.
 

Warren Allison

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I have read a while back an outfit has been crossing LH’s with red Angus, and breeding for solid red polled cattle. I could see using a cross like that as a heifer bull. I do agree that LH cattle have some good qualities that many mainstream breeds are loosing, however the fact still remains that they are slower growing and lighter weight thus probably not going to ever be accepted for mainstream usage.
The value of them. I think, is that they are inexpensive to buy, and inexpensive to maintain, but when crossed with Angus or Brangus, the calves are nearly all polled, nearly all black, look like grade Angus or Brangus, and will wean off as big as a full blood Angus or Brangus. And the resulting 1/2 LH heifers, will make as good a brood cow as any pure bred will. Look at the pics Jafruech posted. His half LH-half Angus cows look like any other grade Angus cows. Little Joe said he is breeding his Longhorns to his Ultra Black bull, and I bet those calves will do as well as any beef cow- Ultra Black cross.
 

Ky hills

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The value of them. I think, is that they are inexpensive to buy, and inexpensive to maintain, but when crossed with Angus or Brangus, the calves are nearly all polled, nearly all black, look like grade Angus or Brangus, and will wean off as big as a full blood Angus or Brangus. And the resulting 1/2 LH heifers, will make as good a brood cow as any pure bred will. Look at the pics Jafruech posted. His half LH-half Angus cows look like any other grade Angus cows. Little Joe said he is breeding his Longhorns to his Ultra Black bull, and I bet those calves will do as well as any beef cow- Ultra Black cross.
I agree that both Longhorn and LH crosses can make some real good cows. I have a couple, one I have had for several years, always calves towards the first of the bunch and will wean off one of the bigger calves. The difference does eventually show up by around a year of age the longhorn influence shows pretty recognizably. The just don’t have the natural thickness of the other calves. There are no doubt LH cattle that are more beef type than others just stating what I have seen with the few we have.
 

Warren Allison

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I started accumulating a herd of Corriente cows back in the 80's, and eventually had 40-50 at any given time. Back then team roping was very popular, and the way you got Corrientes, was by buying them in Mexico, then they had to be quarantined on the border, then you could bring them in. You could get $500-$650 per steer or heifer back then. So, I raised them for my own ropings, and to sell to stock contactors for roping and dogging. The year I met that man that was going to start breeding bucking bulls...'94 or '95. I had 15 Longhorn culled cows ( The LH breeders culled them, because they had horns that started curving up or forward or both before getting very wide. The LH breeders want them 6' to 8' wide, but the horns on these culls were perfect for roping/dogging). I sold the man these 15 LH cows, along with 2 LH-Watusi cross cows, and one fb Watusi cow, because I already had a half Corriente heifer or 2 out of each of them, which is what I bought them for to start with. Anyway, by the end of the 90s, EVERYONE was raising roping steers, and a new fad was hitting the SE, team penning. Roping steers had dropped to $200-$250 a piece. I bred my herd to Angus and Brangus bulls in 99, and got what I wanted... polled, beefy looking cattle, but that could hold out running a lot longer than the commercial beef steers and heifers that people used for penning and sorting. These calves were polled and black, and at weaning were damned near the size of their Corriente mommas, and every bit as big as a commercial Angus or Hereford.. I bred them to where they all calved Oct-Nov, so they'd be weaned and ready to pen or sort come March. I'd keep them til the next bunch was ready to go the next March, then sell them. They'd sell as well as fb Angus commercial steers and heifers would. Thing is, though, you could raise 3 or 4 of those cows and their calves, in the same pastures you'd need for 1 commercial beef cow and calf. Now days, a LOT of people are doing this. If you go to one of the Corriente social media groups, most everyone advertises their Corriente cows and heifers for sale, bred to an Angus, or with a black calf at their side. Black Corriente cows, and bulls, are selling for a lot more than the multi colored Corrientes we always see at rodeos and ropings, too. You can buy 4-5 Corriente cows for what you pay for one good commercial beef cow, and you can FEED them for about what it costs to feed 1 big commercial beef cow. By 2001, I had 100 head of those cows. You need a minimum of 60 head for a team penning, and I got to contracting stock for pennings and sortings. And, holding practices and jackpots at my place. I kept those 100 cows and calves in a 126 acre pasture that was nothing but cut-over timber that had grown up. Volunteer grass, and broom sage, briars, thickets,. etc. There were a few acres that weren't too rough for equipment, that I sewed some fescue and clover, but we never fertilized, or poisoned broadleafs, or bush-hogged or anything. It had 2 ponds and a branch that ran through it. I kept salt in the catch pen, and basically these cattle just raised themselves. We'd pour on Ivermectin when we rounded them up to cut the bull calves, and maybe again when we rounded them up to wean, and that was it. I put the Angus and/or Brangus bulls in with them in Jan and Feb, and would put out hay in the catch pens then, and that's about all the feeding I did. March, when we'd pick up the bulls and wean the calves, I'd put the black Corriente bull I had kept, in with them for clean-up, and leave him there til calving started in October.

I have fooled with cow-calve operations,, replacement heifer operations, raising registered cattle of a few different breeds, but this venture was by far the most profitable of any. Low costs to buy the cows, nearly zero costs to feed them, no losses of either cows or calves, and the income from contracting to provide cattle for pennings and sortings, plus the income from holding my own, then when you sold the steers and heifers, they brought as much or near as much as any other black cattle...steers, heifers or cows.
 

Muddy

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Hell, since they have created black-every-kind-of-cow-there-is...even black Charolais, I am told.... they might create a polled Longhorn!! If they did, probably none of you would have anything else!
There have been several LH breeders working on homozygous black longhorns. I know there are few polled animals in Florida Crackers and Pineywoods cattle.

There was a member on here that breeds beef type longhorns. Beefiest longhorns I ever seen and they can weaning big purebred longhorn calves off...
 

Warren Allison

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There have been several LH breeders working on homozygous black longhorns. I know there are few polled animals in Florida Crackers and Pineywoods cattle.

There was a member on here that breeds beef type longhorns. Beefiest longhorns I ever seen and they can weaning big purebred longhorn calves off...
Yep. Same thing with Corrientes. See my posts above. I have noticed on Corriente sales boards, forums, and groups, they are breeding for black Corrientes, and are paying a premium for them.
 

Muddy

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Yep. Same thing with Corrientes. See my posts above. I have noticed on Corriente sales boards, forums, and groups, they are breeding for black Corrientes, and are paying a premium for them.
I am a moderator for a group on Facebook. All I can tell you that many people are seeking out blacks or solid reds most times. Spotted, linebacks and whites are dirty cheaper because nobody wants them, even the ropers.... but the blue roans are acceptable for some reason. There is a guy who is looking for blue roan Corrientes and breed them to a roan shorthorn bull. He said that blue roan feeders sell very well at his sale barn.
 

Warren Allison

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I am a moderator for a group on Facebook. All I can tell you that many people are seeking out blacks or solid reds most times. Spotted, linebacks and whites are dirty cheaper because nobody wants them, even the ropers.... but the blue roans are acceptable for some reason. There is a guy who is looking for blue roan Corrientes and breed them to a roan shorthorn bull. He said that blue roan feeders sell very well at his sale barn.
Yep. A lot of people buying Corrientes to train their horses, learn to rope ) or bull dog) and practice with, want the black Corrientes, because they intend to breed them with Angus. If team ropers ( or steer wrestlers) are buying them just to rope (or dog), we don't care what color they are...the cheaper the better. Rodeo stock contractors don't want all black, either. The varied colors just look better in the show. The reason people will pay a little more to buy solid blacks, is because when the heifers are roped out, and they breed them to an Angus, they can be more sure they will get a black calve. These black, polled half-Corriente calves will wean off as big as a straight Angus, and it costs less than half to buy, and feed, the cow as it does a straight Angus. I'll bet that is why the guy with the roan Shorthorn bull is wanting to buy roan Corrientes. The resulting calf will be just as good, or nearly as good, as a pureberd Shorthorn, but the cost for the cow, and the cost to maintain them, is a lot less.
 

Ky hills

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Dont look that big in the picture! Lol
Sorry. Just ribbing ya!

Good job catching her so you could be right there to help of needed. You've probly read my stories of heifers...
Yes heifers are an unpredictable adventure for sure. When I saw her this morning I felt like she was pretty close, all the while thinking sure as I get her through n the barn it might be two weeks of wait. Real thankful for how it turned out, and nervous about the rest of the heifers now. Here’s a picture of the little feller standing up after we tube fed him colostrum.218756F4-78C2-4810-B9D9-72352C43C766.jpeg
 

MurraysMutts

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Yes heifers are an unpredictable adventure for sure. When I saw her this morning I felt like she was pretty close, all the while thinking sure as I get her through n the barn it might be two weeks of wait. Real thankful for how it turned out, and nervous about the rest of the heifers now. Here’s a picture of the little feller standing up after we tube fed him colostrum.View attachment 879
Wow! He dang sure dont look little in that picture!!
 

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