Wheres the beef

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Bright Raven

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snoopdog":cig6k6uk said:
Bright Raven":cig6k6uk said:
snoopdog":cig6k6uk said:
With wages adjusted for inflation having dropped for the third quarter in a row, What do you think the consumer will buy at the grocery store ? The cheapest. And it will only get worse as interest rates and fuel prices rise.

Low income earners are already eating hotdogs and ramen noodles. I see whole families parked outside service stations eating hotdogs that have made more orbits on a spit than the earth has in 5 1/2 billion years. Inflation has been eating out lunch for the last 40 years. Can it get worse. Yep!
Hasn't much to do with low income earners , it has to do with the average family , the working poor are the biggest market , and when they have to make a decision on what to eat for dinner , and the bills are looming , it will be chicken or pork.

Buying power has been diminishing for at least 20 years. Adjusted for time value of money, wages have been decreasing. It is not about the "average family". It is about families on the lower income side of the bell curve.

They are under the pressure of eroding buying power. Food purchases is one of the areas that suffers due to the pressures. They reduce the quality of their purchases.
 

Caustic Burno

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Bright Raven":1a75zl9p said:
snoopdog":1a75zl9p said:
Bright Raven":1a75zl9p said:
Low income earners are already eating hotdogs and ramen noodles. I see whole families parked outside service stations eating hotdogs that have made more orbits on a spit than the earth has in 5 1/2 billion years. Inflation has been eating out lunch for the last 40 years. Can it get worse. Yep!
Hasn't much to do with low income earners , it has to do with the average family , the working poor are the biggest market , and when they have to make a decision on what to eat for dinner , and the bills are looming , it will be chicken or pork.

Buying power has been diminishing for at least 20 years. Adjusted for time value of money, wages have been decreasing. It is not about the "average family". It is about families on the lower income side of the bell curve.

They are under the pressure of eroding buying power. Food purchases is one of the areas that suffers due to the pressures. They reduce the quality of their purchases.

We exported manufacturing and buying power at the same time.
Manufacturing pumps income in a community, retail and service suck it out.
 

Bright Raven

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Caustic Burno":r6g5p3qu said:
Bright Raven":r6g5p3qu said:
snoopdog":r6g5p3qu said:
Hasn't much to do with low income earners , it has to do with the average family , the working poor are the biggest market , and when they have to make a decision on what to eat for dinner , and the bills are looming , it will be chicken or pork.

Buying power has been diminishing for at least 20 years. Adjusted for time value of money, wages have been decreasing. It is not about the "average family". It is about families on the lower income side of the bell curve.

They are under the pressure of eroding buying power. Food purchases is one of the areas that suffers due to the pressures. They reduce the quality of their purchases.

We exported manufacturing and buying power at the same time.
Manufacturing pumps income in a community, retail and service suck it out.

Agree. 100 %
 

Jogeephus

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snoopdog":27z7sus0 said:
Bright Raven":27z7sus0 said:
snoopdog":27z7sus0 said:
With wages adjusted for inflation having dropped for the third quarter in a row, What do you think the consumer will buy at the grocery store ? The cheapest. And it will only get worse as interest rates and fuel prices rise.

Low income earners are already eating hotdogs and ramen noodles. I see whole families parked outside service stations eating hotdogs that have made more orbits on a spit than the earth has in 5 1/2 billion years. Inflation has been eating out lunch for the last 40 years. Can it get worse. Yep!
Hasn't much to do with low income earners , it has to do with the average family , the working poor are the biggest market , and when they have to make a decision on what to eat for dinner , and the bills are looming , it will be chicken or pork.

Let's not forget the lottery tickets. I've seen first hand how some will forego buying a gallon of milk for the children to buy a couple of lottery tickets. Here, they will throw you in jail for gambling because it will destroy the family but its completely legal if the government runs it.
 

greybeard

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JMJ Farms":jhpvbsdy said:
greybeard":jhpvbsdy said:
Americans eat about 50 billion lbs of meat per year. Chicken, beef, turkey, pork, & lamb. divided by 365 (days) that is about 13.7 million lbs per day consumed.
2 billion (lbs in cold storage) divided by 13.7 million lbs consumed each day means we as a nation, only have 146 days worth of meat in cold storage.

Add in what we export, and that frozen storage total will dwindle quickly.

I understand your point entirely. But if I’m reading the graph right there is closer to 6.5 billion pounds in cold storage.
(2.5 turkey, 2 beef, 1.25 pork, .75 chicken)
Which would last closer to 17-18 months at the consumption rate you utilized.

I may be misunderstanding the graph. And FWIW, I think we should maintain at least that much in cold storage if possible.

I don't think the colored bars of the graph indicates anything except the total of all meat in storage and what it has been over the course of that time period. The text of the article clearly states USDA estimates 2.5 billion for all frozen meat.
The Journal noted that meat mountain has been building before the trade disputes. However, the recent round of tariffs has made the situation worse. Part of the glut is thanks to overproduction caused by declining feed costs. Over the past decade, U.S. meat production has been increasing and could hit a record 102.7 billion pounds later this year, according to USDA reports.

As a result of the glut, cold-storage warehouses across the country are rapidly filling up. The USDA in June estimated a total 2.5 billion pounds of red meat and poultry in U.S. cold-storage facilities as of the end of May, indicating that today’s storage capacity is about 8 percent above the prior-year period—and just shy of the record.

Here's where it came from:
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07- ... tion-years
https://www.wsj.com/articles/meat-piles ... counts-wsj
 

Nesikep

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What I see is a lot of chicken going into cold storage.. it'll be coming out, and it'll be cheaper than beef, and it's going to suck for beef prices.. I see no reason to be optimistic for beef producers looking at this graph
 

greybeard

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Nesikep":2p7oywe8 said:
What I see is a lot of chicken going into cold storage.. it'll be coming out, and it'll be cheaper than beef, and it's going to suck for beef prices.. I see no reason to be optimistic for beef producers looking at this graph
A single cold storage company (Ramsey) said they have 250 million lbs of poultry in cold storage on any given day.
 

Nesikep

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would have to be one #$%%# of a storage facility...
I worked at an Ikea warehouse that was 1.2 million square feet.. sounds like it would have to be a similar size facility, except cooled!
 

sstterry

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Caustic Burno":1pb9hm25 said:
Bright Raven":1pb9hm25 said:
snoopdog":1pb9hm25 said:
Hasn't much to do with low income earners , it has to do with the average family , the working poor are the biggest market , and when they have to make a decision on what to eat for dinner , and the bills are looming , it will be chicken or pork.

Buying power has been diminishing for at least 20 years. Adjusted for time value of money, wages have been decreasing. It is not about the "average family". It is about families on the lower income side of the bell curve.

They are under the pressure of eroding buying power. Food purchases is one of the areas that suffers due to the pressures. They reduce the quality of their purchases.

We exported manufacturing and buying power at the same time.
Manufacturing pumps income in a community, retail and service suck it out.

The only problem with this theory is that manufacturing is becoming increasingly automated. What companies seek now is one man to run a computer that controls the robot that does the work of ten men. Soon, manufacturing will no longer be the bedrock of the economy.
 

Caustic Burno

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sstterry":2zqgg9lt said:
Caustic Burno":2zqgg9lt said:
Bright Raven":2zqgg9lt said:
Buying power has been diminishing for at least 20 years. Adjusted for time value of money, wages have been decreasing. It is not about the "average family". It is about families on the lower income side of the bell curve.

They are under the pressure of eroding buying power. Food purchases is one of the areas that suffers due to the pressures. They reduce the quality of their purchases.

We exported manufacturing and buying power at the same time.
Manufacturing pumps income in a community, retail and service suck it out.

The only problem with this theory is that manufacturing is becoming increasingly automated. What companies seek now is one man to run a computer that controls the robot that does the work of ten men. Soon, manufacturing will no longer be the bedrock of the economy.

It still produces jobs that put money back into the economy. The manufacturing plant has to buy raw material and repair parts creating more jobs. Retail does nothing but suck money out and sends it to manufacturing.
 

Bright Raven

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sstterry":ps91s1iq said:
Caustic Burno":ps91s1iq said:
Bright Raven":ps91s1iq said:
Buying power has been diminishing for at least 20 years. Adjusted for time value of money, wages have been decreasing. It is not about the "average family". It is about families on the lower income side of the bell curve.

They are under the pressure of eroding buying power. Food purchases is one of the areas that suffers due to the pressures. They reduce the quality of their purchases.

We exported manufacturing and buying power at the same time.
Manufacturing pumps income in a community, retail and service suck it out.

The only problem with this theory is that manufacturing is becoming increasingly automated. What companies seek now is one man to run a computer that controls the robot that does the work of ten men. Soon, manufacturing will no longer be the bedrock of the economy.

But that is also true of retail! For example, McDonalds is moving toward self service orders and the elimination of the order clerk. Automation affects all facets of commerce, production and manufacturing.
 

snoopdog

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sstterry":2mumh9z3 said:
Caustic Burno":2mumh9z3 said:
Bright Raven":2mumh9z3 said:
Buying power has been diminishing for at least 20 years. Adjusted for time value of money, wages have been decreasing. It is not about the "average family". It is about families on the lower income side of the bell curve.

They are under the pressure of eroding buying power. Food purchases is one of the areas that suffers due to the pressures. They reduce the quality of their purchases.

We exported manufacturing and buying power at the same time.
Manufacturing pumps income in a community, retail and service suck it out.

The only problem with this theory is that manufacturing is becoming increasingly automated. What companies seek now is one man to run a computer that controls the robot that does the work of ten men. Soon, manufacturing will no longer be the bedrock of the economy.
All true statements , and that is the conundrum , we have to be flexible to find a solution , and many are not . My way or the hiway does not work in the best interest of most people , too many think too small .
 

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