in future years...

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Anonymous

i hear in about twenty years all small farmers will be doing is raising the cow/calf pairs(if that) and not raising any feeders will this eventually happen and all calves will go to the feedyard to be raised from weaning weight

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A

Anonymous

> i hear in about twenty years all
> small farmers will be doing is
> raising the cow/calf pairs(if
> that) and not raising any feeders
> will this eventually happen and
> all calves will go to the feedyard
> to be raised from weaning weight

I doubt that it will ever happen that "all" calves will go to feedlots. Like the poultry and swine industries, I anticipate that the beef cattle business will become much more consolidated. There will be fewer "players" in the business but they will be much larger in size.

However, one thing that differentiates the cattle business from the swine and poultry businesses is that hogs and birds can be profitably raised in confinement buildings. It isn't profitable for cows to be kept in confinement. They are most efficient (and profitable) grazing lands that aren't fit for crop production and also grazing crop residue (i.e. corn stubble). There are very few investors who can afford to buy/lease large tracts of land to produce all the calves they need for their mega feedlots.

There are also several trends going on in the industry that will provide opportunities for smaller producers to stay in the business:

1. niche markets (i.e.) club calves

2. consumers wanting to know where their food is coming from (rather than from some mego corporation like Conagra). This may allow result in greater demand for freezer beef

3. the animal rights people are starting to get the ear of large corporations like McDonalds and mega grocery chains. Animals raised in confinement are now allowed more room in their cages, crates, etc. In Europe, where the animal rights people have had more influence, confinement feeding is becoming more of a rarity. I envision that the animal rights people are going to be more influential with the food industry here in the US in the next 20 years. If that is the case I wouldn't be surprised if eventually feedlots will be requred to provide protection for cattle from rain, wind & sun. I also wouldn't be surprised if feedlots will be required to provide dry areas for cattle to lay in.

All these restricitons will make feeding cattle in large operations less profitable. If this happens we will likely see more cattle fed on more traditional grain farms again (though I doubt that it will ever get back to the farm feedlots that we had in the 60's and 70's).
 
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Anonymous

> And where will the breeding stock
> come from?

Just like the other segments of the beef cattle business, we will likely continue to see fewer and larger beef genetic suppliers. Some smaller producers will align themselves with larger herds that want to diversify geographically (i.e. Nichols Farms) or just need more bulls with their genetics.

Some smaller seedstock suppliers will supply bulls and replacement females to commercial cattlemen close to home. They may also diversify by selling freezer beef, club calves, and/or other niche markets.

With the relatively low costs of A.I. and embryo transfer smaller seedstock producers are able to provide world class genetics.
 
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Anonymous

> I doubt that it will ever happen
> that "all" calves will
> go to feedlots. Like the poultry
> and swine industries, I anticipate
> that the beef cattle business will
> become much more consolidated.
> There will be fewer
> "players" in the
> business but they will be much
> larger in size.

> However, one thing that
> differentiates the cattle business
> from the swine and poultry
> businesses is that hogs and birds
> can be profitably raised in
> confinement buildings. It isn't
> profitable for cows to be kept in
> confinement. They are most
> efficient (and profitable) grazing
> lands that aren't fit for crop
> production and also grazing crop
> residue (i.e. corn stubble). There
> are very few investors who can
> afford to buy/lease large tracts
> of land to produce all the calves
> they need for their mega feedlots.

> There are also several trends
> going on in the industry that will
> provide opportunities for smaller
> producers to stay in the business:

> 1. niche markets (i.e.) club
> calves

> 2. consumers wanting to know where
> their food is coming from (rather
> than from some mego corporation
> like Conagra). This may allow
> result in greater demand for
> freezer beef

> 3. the animal rights people are
> starting to get the ear of large
> corporations like McDonalds and
> mega grocery chains. Animals
> raised in confinement are now
> allowed more room in their cages,
> crates, etc. In Europe, where the
> animal rights people have had more
> influence, confinement feeding is
> becoming more of a rarity. I
> envision that the animal rights
> people are going to be more
> influential with the food industry
> here in the US in the next 20
> years. If that is the case I
> wouldn't be surprised if
> eventually feedlots will be
> requred to provide protection for
> cattle from rain, wind & sun.
> I also wouldn't be surprised if
> feedlots will be required to
> provide dry areas for cattle to
> lay in.

> All these restricitons will make
> feeding cattle in large operations
> less profitable. If this happens
> we will likely see more cattle fed
> on more traditional grain farms
> again (though I doubt that it will
> ever get back to the farm feedlots
> that we had in the 60's and 70's). I'm not questioning anything you had to say, but on your number 3 if the animal rights activists get their way whats your thoughts (as well as anyone else) that these mega feedlots will pack up and move to another country ?
 
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Anonymous

If the animal rights people get there way, there will be no feedlots. They oppose raising animals for food under any conditions. Pushing for better conditions is only the first step. As a group, they are very ignorant of animals, farm animals in particular.
 
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A

Anonymous

> I doubt that it will ever happen
> that "all" calves will
> go to feedlots. Like the poultry
> and swine industries, I anticipate
> that the beef cattle business will
> become much more consolidated.
> There will be fewer
> "players" in the
> business but they will be much
> larger in size.

> However, one thing that
> differentiates the cattle business
> from the swine and poultry
> businesses is that hogs and birds
> can be profitably raised in
> confinement buildings. It isn't
> profitable for cows to be kept in
> confinement. They are most
> efficient (and profitable) grazing
> lands that aren't fit for crop
> production and also grazing crop
> residue (i.e. corn stubble). There
> are very few investors who can
> afford to buy/lease large tracts
> of land to produce all the calves
> they need for their mega feedlots.

> There are also several trends
> going on in the industry that will
> provide opportunities for smaller
> producers to stay in the business:

> 1. niche markets (i.e.) club
> calves

> 2. consumers wanting to know where
> their food is coming from (rather
> than from some mego corporation
> like Conagra). This may allow
> result in greater demand for
> freezer beef

> 3. the animal rights people are
> starting to get the ear of large
> corporations like McDonalds and
> mega grocery chains. Animals
> raised in confinement are now
> allowed more room in their cages,
> crates, etc. In Europe, where the
> animal rights people have had more
> influence, confinement feeding is
> becoming more of a rarity. I
> envision that the animal rights
> people are going to be more
> influential with the food industry
> here in the US in the next 20
> years. If that is the case I
> wouldn't be surprised if
> eventually feedlots will be
> requred to provide protection for
> cattle from rain, wind & sun.
> I also wouldn't be surprised if
> feedlots will be required to
> provide dry areas for cattle to
> lay in.

> All these restricitons will make
> feeding cattle in large operations
> less profitable. If this happens
> we will likely see more cattle fed
> on more traditional grain farms
> again (though I doubt that it will
> ever get back to the farm feedlots
> that we had in the 60's and 70's).

what are niche markets?

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

Amen Dun! Think there are definitely anti-meat-eating-animal clothing wearing idiots out there. Everything I've heard or read is that vast majority of them are strict vegetarians (genetically linked...lol?) and nothing we or anyone else can say will probably change their minds. Fortunately, they are in the minority of the world's eating population. LONG LIVE BEEF AND OTHER MEATS!
 
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Anonymous

Niche markets are samll segments that produce/market a product in a none mainstream way. Organic, Wagyu beef, you pick strawberries, all niche market. And there are conservatively 199 bijillion others.

dun

> what are niche markets?
 
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Anonymous

Well, don't want to give real AI a bad name. These AR groups just keep coming out of the woodwork. Some of you that are subscribed to the Black Ink discussion list probably saw the recent note about a new group that states "Universities must not serve industries that torment and destroy animals, breed animals in order to kill them, and perpetuate the animals-as-property ethical disaster."

So they are going after our ag universities. I can post the entire article if anyone is interested.

There is good website at <A HREF="http://www.animalrights.net" TARGET="_blank">www.animalrights.net</A> whose motto is "debunking the animal rights movement." The owner of the site continually posts articles about AR activities, some pretty stupid. Until I read that site, I had no idea of how they were trying to stop medical researchers from using animals in their work. It's a bit scary when you read how successful they have been in Europe.
 
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Anonymous

Yes...the AR bunch have their followers. They tend to go overboard on their causes. On the other hand, don't think any of us are against HUMANE treatment of animals, 2 or 4 legged; and, as we know, there are some huge cartel operations that do have inhumane and unsanitary operations. HOWEVER, for the AR bunch to continually blast the animal industry is little scary and who knows how many of them are still in the closet and lurking in the shadows to infiltrate normal, legitimate thinking and operations. When we think of what the "anti-gun" activists did in Britain, Australia, and Canada with personal weapons confiscation from law-abiding citizens (only to have a very significant increase in major crime) with a number of these groups hitting on the USA too--well, these extremists do have some clout and should be carefully watched. Yet, in a free society we all have a right to our own opinion and behavior (as long as we don't infringe on the rights of others).
 
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Anonymous

The AR groups are getting out of control. They are threatening America as we know it. They are in every area from the medical field to the feedlot to the backyard with your own dog. If they get their way I want to know where they propose all those animals go?? And then all the people that owned those animals are spose to be reinbursed how?? I can't understand most of those people. But I dunno if anybody but themselves do.
 
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Anonymous

Jake you hit the nail on the head!!As a stock contractor with rodeo I have them breathing down my throat.I wish they would just go away and leave us alone.My e-mail address is <A HREF="mailto:eek:[email protected]">[email protected]</A> free to e-mail me on the subject anytime.The AR groups are getting out of
> control. They are threatening
> America as we know it. They are in
> every area from the medical field
> to the feedlot to the backyard
> with your own dog. If they get
> their way I want to know where
> they propose all those animals
> go?? And then all the people that
> owned those animals are spose to
> be reinbursed how?? I can't
> understand most of those people.
> But I dunno if anybody but
> themselves do.



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