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cow not breeding back

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BRYANT

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I have a cow that I raised, bred her at around 14 months, had and raised a nice calf with no problems. I check my cows every week one or two times and it has become a thing ever couple weeks for the bull to be riding this cow. I know my bull is good because the other cows in this pasture are all having calves now and she should be. The first time I saw it was back in Nov. a couple months after I pulled calf off of the cow now in the last month we have been at the place more than normally doing some work and two times the bull was after her. Back in Nov I thought she just did not breed back like she should have but now I think there is something going on. any ideas or just ship her
 

Caustic Burno

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BRYANT":3v1edicg said:
I have a cow that I raised, bred her at around 14 months, had and raised a nice calf with no problems. I check my cows every week one or two times and it has become a thing ever couple weeks for the bull to be riding this cow. I know my bull is good because the other cows in this pasture are all having calves now and she should be. The first time I saw it was back in Nov. a couple months after I pulled calf off of the cow now in the last month we have been at the place more than normally doing some work and two times the bull was after her. Back in Nov I thought she just did not breed back like she should have but now I think there is something going on. any ideas or just ship her

Are they vaccinated for Lepto?
 
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BRYANT

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CB I gave them the shot that vet recommended at around 9 months but I am not for sure probably not ?????

jerry27150":f0lk25kw said:
any that don't breed on time here grow wheels
yes I know a lot of people let them grow wheels to fast. I have seen a lot of first calf heifers not breed back as fast as they should but be fine from there on out. First calf heifers are not old cows second calf I expect them to breed back fast also. This is one ( 1 ) out of several that did not breed back ???
 

A.J.

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She could be cystic if she is coming into heat more than normal and not settling.
 
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BRYANT

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Caustic Burno":2pnyvqzr said:
My bet is Lepto you need to vaccinate yearly. Do you you have hogs? If so they are notorious for bringing lepto in.
If I even suspected lepto I would be hitting them with this. To cheap an insurance policy.

https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.htm ... 848BCDF84D
no hogs thank goodness
I will sure do it, would I do it now or wait till I wean the calves? This place is almost 50 (50) miles from home , where I have a good working set up so I have to load them and move them to work. I am planning on selling several older cows this year then selling every thing else next year and start buying old cows in February calve them out and sell in Aug./Sept. I have did that in the past and did well plus I did not have to mess with them in winter.
 

TCRanch

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Not just hogs but coyotes, raccoons, many wild animals can be the source of Lepto and there are different strains. I started using the Vira Shield 6+VL5 HB. The only way to know for sure if she's open, has Lepto or is possibly cyctic is to have your vet check her out & draw blood.
 
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BRYANT

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I am not familiar with lepto is I spread from one cow to another and would only one have it?
 

Caustic Burno

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BRYANT":3lvhrvby said:
Caustic Burno":3lvhrvby said:
My bet is Lepto you need to vaccinate yearly. Do you you have hogs? If so they are notorious for bringing lepto in.
If I even suspected lepto I would be hitting them with this. To cheap an insurance policy.

https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.htm ... 848BCDF84D
no hogs thank goodness
I will sure do it, would I do it now or wait till I wean the calves? This place is almost 50 (50) miles from home , where I have a good working set up so I have to load them and move them to work. I am planning on selling several older cows this year then selling every thing else next year and start buying old cows in February calve them out and sell in Aug./Sept. I have did that in the past and did well plus I did not have to mess with them in winter.

I would vaccinate my entire herd asap.
I booster every year first week in January. Neighbors and I get together and vaccinate all of ours.
 

True Grit Farms

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Give her a shot of Cystorelin while your at it. Triangle 10 HB is what you need to use for Lepto, do not use live vaccines in cows that could be pregnant.
 

Bright Raven

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I disagree with CB. It is not likely leptospirosis. Leptospirosis is more likely to cause abortions in the last trimester or mid term. Furthermore, leptospirosis would not affect one cow in the herd.

Abortions associated with incidental host infection tend to occur late term and in groups or so-called “abortion storms.” In contrast, abortions occurring after infection with serovar Hardjo tend to be more sporadic and can occur mid- to late pregnancy and several months after initial infection.

If only one cow is affected and she is returning to estrus on an irregular basis, I would suspect she has a cystic ovary - multiple follicles. It is easily treated with cystorelin.

Merck is an excellent reference for livestock diseases. Read this to understand leptospirosis.

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/generaliz ... -ruminants
 

TCRanch

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Caustic Burno":2a0xaskz said:
BRYANT":2a0xaskz said:
Caustic Burno":2a0xaskz said:
My bet is Lepto you need to vaccinate yearly. Do you you have hogs? If so they are notorious for bringing lepto in.
If I even suspected lepto I would be hitting them with this. To cheap an insurance policy.

https://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.htm ... 848BCDF84D
no hogs thank goodness
I will sure do it, would I do it now or wait till I wean the calves? This place is almost 50 (50) miles from home , where I have a good working set up so I have to load them and move them to work. I am planning on selling several older cows this year then selling every thing else next year and start buying old cows in February calve them out and sell in Aug./Sept. I have did that in the past and did well plus I did not have to mess with them in winter.

I would vaccinate my entire herd asap.
I booster every year first week in January. Neighbors and I get together and vaccinate all of ours.
Including the bulls!
 

Caustic Burno

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TCRanch":2e829gdj said:
Caustic Burno":2e829gdj said:
BRYANT":2e829gdj said:
no hogs thank goodness
I will sure do it, would I do it now or wait till I wean the calves? This place is almost 50 (50) miles from home , where I have a good working set up so I have to load them and move them to work. I am planning on selling several older cows this year then selling every thing else next year and start buying old cows in February calve them out and sell in Aug./Sept. I have did that in the past and did well plus I did not have to mess with them in winter.

I would vaccinate my entire herd asap.
I booster every year first week in January. Neighbors and I get together and vaccinate all of ours.
Including the bulls!


Yes!

“Bulls are commonly both vaccinated for leptospirosis and treated with antibiotics to clear the "carrier state." Bradley Mills, DVM, says he addresses the bull problem through antibiotics to clear infections and vaccinations to prevent re-infections. "There"s good evidence that oxytetracycline will clear it in cows, but there"s a question about curing it in bulls."

Bulls are probably harder to clear, agrees Carole Bolin, DVM, PhD. "Our diagnostics are not as good in bulls. A lot of people are using antibiotics in bull studs. They"ll have bulls that get a titer to Hardjo-bovis, and they want that titer to be gone, but antibiotics are largely ineffective in making the titer decrease."

How effective the antibiotics are in actually curing the bull of the infection is a separate matter. In theory, it should work, but it may not work as well as it apparently does in cows. Bolin says the drug regimen should eliminate the infection from the kidneys, but some think that the drugs do not penetrate the tissues of the bull"s reproductive tract sufficiently to have the desired effect.”
 

Caustic Burno

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Bright Raven":1xhkphel said:
I disagree with CB. It is not likely leptospirosis. Leptospirosis is more likely to cause abortions in the last trimester or mid term. Furthermore, leptospirosis would not affect one cow in the herd.

Abortions associated with incidental host infection tend to occur late term and in groups or so-called “abortion storms.” In contrast, abortions occurring after infection with serovar Hardjo tend to be more sporadic and can occur mid- to late pregnancy and several months after initial infection.

If only one cow is affected and she is returning to estrus on an irregular basis, I would suspect she has a cystic ovary - multiple follicles. It is easily treated with cystorelin.

Merck is an excellent reference for livestock diseases. Read this to understand leptospirosis.

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/generaliz ... -ruminants


That is why he should vaccinate with Vira Shield 6 takes care of lepto and vibrio both of which can cause infertility.

“Infection may cause an increased number of repeat breeder cows. There is circumstantial evidence of infertility following isolation of Leptospira Hardjo from the reproductive tract of a high percentage of repeat breeder cows. Leptospira Hardjo may also cause embryonic death.”

It is not just mid to late term abortions
 

Bright Raven

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Caustic Burno":8hmbgfkb said:
Bright Raven":8hmbgfkb said:
I disagree with CB. It is not likely leptospirosis. Leptospirosis is more likely to cause abortions in the last trimester or mid term. Furthermore, leptospirosis would not affect one cow in the herd.

Abortions associated with incidental host infection tend to occur late term and in groups or so-called “abortion storms.” In contrast, abortions occurring after infection with serovar Hardjo tend to be more sporadic and can occur mid- to late pregnancy and several months after initial infection.

If only one cow is affected and she is returning to estrus on an irregular basis, I would suspect she has a cystic ovary - multiple follicles. It is easily treated with cystorelin.

Merck is an excellent reference for livestock diseases. Read this to understand leptospirosis.

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/generaliz ... -ruminants


That is why he should vaccinate with Vira Shield 6 takes care of lepto and vibrio both of which can cause infertility.

“Infection may cause an increased number of repeat breeder cows. There is circumstantial evidence of infertility following isolation of Leptospira Hardjo from the reproductive tract of a high percentage of repeat breeder cows. Leptospira Hardjo may also cause embryonic death.”

It is not just mid to late term abortions

First. All beef herds should be vaccinated for all the Leptospira species of bacteria including the HB serovar.

Based on the information provided, it sounds like the cow is cycling on an irregular basis. He said the bull was on her in a two week span. He stated this:

I check my cows every week one or two times and it has become a thing ever couple weeks for the bull to be riding this cow.

That is suggestive of a cystic ovary. If his herd is not being vaccinated for Leptospira, more than one cow is likely to be infected by the bacteria.

It is speculation on all our parts, but IMO, the information provided is more consistent with a cystic ovary than leptospirosis.
 

Bright Raven

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TCRanch":2688l0fl said:
Including the bulls!

I cannot off hand think of any vaccine that bulls should not also get.

Leptospira
Clostridial
Fetal Protection/Respiratory Viruses
Vibriosis
Scours
Trichomonas
 

True Grit Farms

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Bright Raven":1vhpfgkj said:
TCRanch":1vhpfgkj said:
Including the bulls!

I cannot off hand think of any vaccine that bulls should not also get.

Leptospira
Clostridial
Fetal Protection/Respiratory Viruses
Vibriosis
Scours
Trichomonas

What pharmaceutical company do you work for? I recommend using Calvary 9, and Triangle 10 HB. Anything more treat as needed.
 

Caustic Burno

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Bryant
COD is more common in dairy than beef.

Neighbor got into a fight with lepto calves were all born dying within three days. Several of his cows continued to cycle and not settle even after putting on a vacation program.
This is a good read
“Managing disease can be a frustrating proposition. This Guide can help you identify which disease is damaging your cattle.
Leptospirosis


Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease, caused by bacteria of genus Leptospira. Depending on location different serogroups are often more prevalent.

Some examples of different serovars include hardjo, pomona, canicola, icterohaemorrhagiae, and grippotyphosa.

Cattle are the maintentance hosts for hardjo, but as this is specialised to survive within cattle, the infection is less severe. Animals infected with other strains (such as pomona) suffer more severe illness.

Maintenance hosts carry the bacteria and expose other susceptible animals. Maintenance hosts can be cattle, pigs, dogs, rodents or horses.

An animal may be infected by serovars maintained by its own species (maintenance host infection or host-adapted infection) or serovars maintained by other species (incidental infection or nonhost-adapted infection).

Leptospirosis is transmitted either directly between animals or indirectly through the environment.

Symptoms

The clinical signs of Lepto depend on the herd’s degree of resistance or immunity, the infecting serovar, and the age of the animal infected.

Host-adapted

Leptospira hardjo-bovis is the only host-adapted Lepto serovar in cattle and can infect animals at any age, including young calves. Because cattle are the maintenance host for hardjo-bovis, infection with this serovar will often produce a carrier state in the kidneys associated with long-term urinary shedding.

In addition, infections with hardjo-bovis can persist in the reproductive tract. The infertility that can result from persistent reproductive tract infections is perhaps the most economically damaging aspect of leptospirosis. Low antibody titers are typically associated with hardjo-bovis infections, making detection and diagnosis difficult.

Nonhost-adapted

Lepto serovars include Leptospira pomona, icterohaemorrhagiae, canicola, and grippotyphosa. Because cattle are incidental hosts for these Lepto serovars, the clinical signs are typically very different than infection with hardjo-bovis.

When leptospirosis associated with nonhost-adapted Lepto serovars occurs in calves, the result is high fever, anemia, red urine, jaundice, and sometimes death in three to five days.

In older cattle, the initial symptoms such as fever and lethargy are often milder and usually go unnoticed. In addition, older animals usually do not die from leptospirosis. Lactating cows produce less milk, and, for a week or more, the milk they produce is thick and yellow.

Leptospirosis with nonhost-adapted Lepto serovars also affects pregnant cows causing embryonic death, abortions, stillbirths, retained placenta, and the birth of weak calves. Abortions usually occur three to ten weeks after infection.

Treatment

Antibiotic therapy should be prescribed for animals with leptospirosis. Antibiotics can also eliminate persitant infections.

Infected animals should be segregated from others to avoid transmission of the disease.

Treatment has proven most effective when animals are treated during the leptospiremia. However, antibiotic therapy during chronic infection may reduce the carrier status.

When infection storms through a herd, especially when many pregnant cows are involved, simultaneous treatment and vaccination of all animals will reduce new cases and abortions if treatment is administered early in the herd infection.

Prevention

Vaccination is relied on to increase resistance to infection.

The primary course of immunisation consists of two injections four weeks apart followed by annual boosting. Vaccination should prevent urine shedding following exposure and will protect against milk drop and abortion.

Annual vaccination should be used in closed herds, whereas semiannual vaccination should be considered for open herds.

Calves born from vaccinated cows are only immune for about six months, and will need their own programme of vaccination.

Management methods to reduce transmission include rat control, fencing cattle from potentially contaminated streams and ponds, separating cattle from pigs and wildlife, selecting replacement stock from herds that are seronegative for leptospirosis, and chemoprophylaxis and vaccination of replacement stock.

In some cases streptomycin is added as a precautionary measure to semen from bulls held at artificial insemination centres.”

Nuff said
 

skyhightree1

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BRYANT":34vs6a1a said:
I have a cow that I raised, bred her at around 14 months, had and raised a nice calf with no problems. I check my cows every week one or two times and it has become a thing ever couple weeks for the bull to be riding this cow. I know my bull is good because the other cows in this pasture are all having calves now and she should be. The first time I saw it was back in Nov. a couple months after I pulled calf off of the cow now in the last month we have been at the place more than normally doing some work and two times the bull was after her. Back in Nov I thought she just did not breed back like she should have but now I think there is something going on. any ideas or just ship her

I had one that's always been the best cow bulled breed her then next thing you know he was doing it again went on for 3 months I didn't have time to really deal with that but this year im not sure if she will get a life pass as she has been a dynamite cow or what I will do.
 
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