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Corn bread skillet

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Lammie

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I have inherited, from my folks' house, two sets of cornbread skillets. They have six corn shaped depressions in them, made of cast iron. I don't remember my Granny using them, but I know that they came from her house after she passed in 1976. I can remember my mom trying to use them in the oven but the cornbread stuck to the insides. Is that how you used it or do you use in on the stove top? Just wondering. They are pretty neat, that's why I snagged them.
 

farmwriter

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yes, they're for oven use. Try coating the indentions with crisco and preheating before baking. If your skillet and the grease is really hot, the crust is better and less likely to stick. Use over time helps with the sticking, too.
 

Texas Gal

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farmwriter":3melva5i said:
yes, they're for oven use. Try coating the indentions with crisco and preheating before baking. If your skillet and the grease is really hot, the crust is better and less likely to stick. Use over time helps with the sticking, too.

All the above PLUS do not put them in the dishwasher or wash them with any kind of soap. Just rinse them out with water, heat them up and wipe dry with paper towel; then coat with crisco (or some other solid shortening, not oil).
 

Bez+

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Before you cook anything - scrub the heck out of them and season them.

If they are cast iron you need to do the following - this is the family method:

Take your very clean cast iron pan and coat the inside of the frying pan or pot liberally with cooking oil - an oil that has a saturated fat in it like lard works very well.

Put in a pre-heated oven - 400 degrees or better

Leave there until the pan becomes very hot and oil starts to smoke

Take out of oven and place on a board and let cool

Wipe clean with a damp cloth

Note: My mom NEVER washes her cast iron pans and she never dries them. If they need to be cleaned she uses straight water and then places them on the stove until the water evapourates - she tends to turn the stove on for a few minutes to dry them - in the winter she just puts them on top of the wood stove for a few minutes - the pans will come dry quickly.

Once in a while she takes some Crisco or similar oil and rubs a little all over the cooking area of the pan.

If done correctly, and maintained correctly - all cast iron pans are pretty much a non stick surface.

If you ever put them in hot and soapy water to clean them you have to start the seasoning process all over again.

We have gone to almost 100 percent cast in this house - we threw out all those "non stick" frying pans years ago and tossed all the aluminum frying pans as well

Look after them - cast iron is the best

Regards

Bez+
 

MO_cows

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If you absolutely must clean out the "corn" indentations better, try a soft plastic brush like an old toothbrush and hot water. But no detergent and keep it greased, and pre-heat for use, as the others advised. That will really help to prevent sticking and season the iron. Cast iron gets better the more often you use it.

I am fortunate to have my grandmother's cast iron skillets. She was 87 when she died so no telling how long they have been in service. (We found a wooden-handled biscuit cutter in her drawer, still in good condition, that my Dad remembers was HIS grandma's and in use in the 1940's) I would rather cook in them than my modern non-stick skillet. Better control of heat and non-stick properties are just as good if well seasoned.
 

Jogeephus

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I have one of those too and agree with what's been said about putting a little butter or greese in it before pouring the meal. Another thing that will help is to put the mold in the oven and preheat it to the temp you are going to cook at then remove it and pour the batter in it. This will help with those kernals.
 
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Lammie

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Thanks everyone. It's not quite corn bread season around here. I'm trying not to use the oven as much. But come cooler weather, I'm looking forward to using them along with a good beef stew or pot of beans.

I have several cast iron skillets that I use. I just remember Mama having trouble with those kernals.
 
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