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Bull

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Anonymous

Guest
I have a 22 month old black angus bull and he weighs about 1200lbs and I was wondering about how many cows he can effectivley service? How tall should should an angus be @ that age? He's not as tall as some of my cows.



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Anonymous

Guest
> I have a 22 month old black angus
> bull and he weighs about 1200lbs
> and I was wondering about how many
> cows he can effectivley service?
> How tall should should an angus be
> @ that age? He's not as tall as
> some of my cows.

Rod- A lot depends on size of pasture, terrain, and how many cows you have to breed- I run in pretty easy country and run 1 (angus) bull to every 20-25 cows. In the rougher country some run as low as 1-10 or 1-12. A yearling angus bull can easily breed 10-15 cows and a 2 year old could handle 30-40 in a small pasture. I know of some purebred ranchers that have ran 1 old angus bull with as many as 60 cows in a limited sized pasture with fairly good success.

I wouldn't worry that much about height. Problem with half the cattle anymore is they are too tall and framey. 1200 lbs is light for a bull of that age althought it would be hard to tell without seeing his condition- Weight and body conformation is a lot more important than height.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Where did you get him? A bull that size at 22 mos. is damned small. He's probably got inferior genetics and you should lease a bull or buy a new one. Nothing can change the genetic makeup of a calf crop quicker than a bull, whether for the good or the bad is how you select your bulls. Do your homework get a good bull, if you don't know what a good bull is then ask someone who does or get out of the cattle industry.

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Anonymous

Guest
Let's see now... option A) Do homework option B) Ask someone knowledgable option C) Get out of the cattle business

What a tough decision.

> Where did you get him? A bull that
> size at 22 mos. is damned small.
> He's probably got inferior
> genetics and you should lease a
> bull or buy a new one. Nothing can
> change the genetic makeup of a
> calf crop quicker than a bull,
> whether for the good or the bad is
> how you select your bulls. Do your
> homework get a good bull, if you
> don't know what a good bull is
> then ask someone who does or get
> out of the cattle industry.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
you forgot option D) don't pay attention to everything that is written
> Let's see now... option A) Do
> homework option B) Ask someone
> knowledgable option C) Get out of
> the cattle business

> What a tough decision.



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Anonymous

Guest
> you forgot option D) don't pay
> attention to everything that is
> written

I purchased my bull from a local angus farm. A good cattleman told me he was a very good bulll and that I should purchase him. He just looks a little small framed to me, but he is very stocky.



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Anonymous

Guest
> I purchased my bull from a local
> angus farm. A good cattleman told
> me he was a very good bulll and
> that I should purchase him. He
> just looks a little small framed
> to me, but he is very stocky.

Rod

I wouldn't worry if he's smaller framed. I've spent a lot of time looking for good small framed angus bulls, because the industry was breeding them too big in my opinion. If they'd keep it up the cows would be taller than the saddle horses and eat as much as those horses. It all depends on your cows and your grazing situation. For me the under 1200lb, under 6 frame cattle work better for me. When its 40 below those 1500-1600 lb. cows can eat a haystack fast. Two websites to look at that really have good smaller framed cows and a good philosophy for why they raise them are: <A HREF="http://www.diamonddangus.com" TARGET="_blank">www.diamonddangus.com</A> and <A HREF="http://www.pharocattle.com" TARGET="_blank">www.pharocattle.com</A>.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I've been listening to Kit Pharo for a few years now. Take whatever he say's with a grain of salt. I am all for smaller framed cattle 1200 to 1300 lb cow is ideal for me but Pharo takes it to the extreme, those bulls might work ok in drought situations in Eastern Montana but for the average cattlemen the bulls are impractictal. Another thing about them is that their not cheap, sale average for 300 bulls last year: $2750.

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Anonymous

Guest
> I've been listening to Kit Pharo
> for a few years now. Take whatever
> he say's with a grain of salt. I
> am all for smaller framed cattle
> 1200 to 1300 lb cow is ideal for
> me but Pharo takes it to the
> extreme, those bulls might work ok
> in drought situations in Eastern
> Montana but for the average
> cattlemen the bulls are
> impractictal. Another thing about
> them is that their not cheap, sale
> average for 300 bulls last year:
> $2750.

Blackpower

I have to agree with you that Kit does take it to the other end of the extremes. The DeBoo family at Diamond D have a pretty good program for moderate framed bulls- problem is they're starting to get pricey,too. I think they were discovered when more people started looking for these type bulls. I have a neighbor that bought a couple and is really pleased with them. You are right, a lot of the type of cattle that work best for you depends on weather and terrain.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
> Blackpower

> I have to agree with you that Kit
> does take it to the other end of
> the extremes. The DeBoo family at
> Diamond D have a pretty good
> program for moderate framed bulls-
> problem is they're starting to get
> pricey,too. I think they were
> discovered when more people
> started looking for these type
> bulls. I have a neighbor that
> bought a couple and is really
> pleased with them. You are right,
> a lot of the type of cattle that
> work best for you depends on
> weather and terrain.

Thanks for the information Oldtimer.

Rod



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