Why Angus?

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Frankie

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Demand grows for Angus calves

Calf prices have been up and down, but the Angus advantage keeps growing, even while supplies of Angus calves increased as a share of all cattle. That’s according to nine years of data in the Pfizer Animal Health-supported analysis of Superior Livestock video auction sales. (See also “Black bonus” for a detailed look at these values in the Northern Plains.)

Most of the calves sold on the video include data on breed type, which has always had an effect on sale price. Starting in this decade, data analysis began to break out and quantify those variables.

From 2000 through 2008, data on more than 3.3 million head in 27,472 lots show an upward trend line in the relative added value of calves that are primarily Angus, the top-value category each year.

Strict guidelines classified cattle based on seller description into one of five categories: mixed English or English crosses, English-Continental crosses, primarily Angus, black or black-whitefaced, and cattle with “ear.”

Mostly black English calves with less than a 90% share of black individuals only qualified as English/English crosses. Lots of black or black-whitefaced calves had to be at least 90% black hided, and primarily Angus calves had to be described as at least 90% Angus by the seller. Brangus calves that were 90% or more black were not included in the analyses.

Using that Brahman-influence “eared” category as a base, the study showed a range of premiums for all other types of calves from 2000 to 2008 (Figure 1). “Last year, the Angus bonus reached its highest on record, at $7.64 per hundredweight (cwt.),” notes Mark McCully, Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) assistant vice president for supply. The spread has ranged from a low of $4.60 in 2001 (see Figure 2).

The value of English-Continental crosses relative to primarily Angus remained fairly steady over time at a $2.50/cwt. to $2.70/cwt. discount. However, the volume share of Continental crosses faded from about half of the mix in 2000 to 32% in recent years. Meanwhile, the share of primarily Angus combined with black and black-whitefaced calves climbed from 16.6% in 2000 to 42.6% last year, McCully points out.

Sorry. The Tables won't copy. See them here:

http://www.angus.org/pub/newsroom/relea ... Grows.html
 

houstoncutter

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your dead on Frankie about the popularity of Angus sired cattle........of course you also have to take credit for the rise in yeild grades as well..............so the next decade might look a bit different as packers are getting tired of the black outliners....namely 4's and 5's............So far the only way to solve that problem is to cross with continental bull
 
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Frankie

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houstoncutter":3dt6sv4q said:
your dead on Frankie about the popularity of Angus sired cattle........of course you also have to take credit for the rise in yeild grades as well..............so the next decade might look a bit different as packers are getting tired of the black outliners....namely 4's and 5's............So far the only way to solve that problem is to cross with continental bull

They should be cracking down on the outliers. 4s and 5s are docked heavily. But, sorry, using continental bulls isn't necessarily the answer. Many Angus bulls offer negative backfat EPDs, plus management plays a key role in yield grade.
 

whitecow

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They should be cracking down on the outliers. 4s and 5s are docked heavily. But, sorry, using continental bulls isn't necessarily the answer. Many Angus bulls offer negative backfat EPDs, plus management plays a key role in yield grade.[/quote]

Many Angus bulls have provide great marbling with low backfat. Some Continental bulls also offer great marbling with low backfat. I agree that management in the feedlot a key to reducing the 4's and 5's. Unforunately, most of the feedlots have to work on pen averages. The pens are usually put together based on how the animals look, not the genetics. The calves out of those great marbling and great yielding bulls are mixed in with the more common great marbling, heavy BF Angus calves.
 

Gelbvieh 5

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Frankie":3s79ewhp said:
houstoncutter":3s79ewhp said:
your dead on Frankie about the popularity of Angus sired cattle........of course you also have to take credit for the rise in yeild grades as well..............so the next decade might look a bit different as packers are getting tired of the black outliners....namely 4's and 5's............So far the only way to solve that problem is to cross with continental bull

They should be cracking down on the outliers. 4s and 5s are docked heavily. But, sorry, using continental bulls is not the answer. Many Angus bulls offer negative backfat EPDs, plus management plays a key role in yield grade.


OK folks time to break out the shovels again. Is this a cyclical thing or do you just spew this crap when the mood strikes you. You KNOW darned good and well that using continental bulls on angus or hereford improves YG's. It has also been known to install some butt on them at the same time. Didn't we just see some results of a feedlot test where continentals actually won the darned thing and I believe those tests are based on a combination of Marbling and YG. Unless you have some info that Braunvieh are not continentals but actually Brown Angus
 

hillsdown

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GV5 did I miss that study ? Can you post a link as I would love to read it as well as forward it on to some other continental breeders.


Thanks..
 

ROB

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hillsdown":1teeimqb said:
GV5 did I miss that study ? Can you post a link as I would love to read it as well as forward it on to some other continental breeders.


Thanks..

hillsdown - i think GV5 is referring to the post i put on the breeds board yesterday "BEST (beef empire steer trial)"

ROB
 

hillsdown

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ROB":1olqcmli said:
hillsdown":1olqcmli said:
GV5 did I miss that study ? Can you post a link as I would love to read it as well as forward it on to some other continental breeders.


Thanks..

hillsdown - i think GV5 is referring to the post i put on the breeds board yesterday "BEST (beef empire steer trial)"

ROB

Thanks Rob, I did miss it. Interesting read.
 
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Frankie

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Gelbvieh 5":33pbjquj said:
Frankie":33pbjquj said:
houstoncutter":33pbjquj said:
your dead on Frankie about the popularity of Angus sired cattle........of course you also have to take credit for the rise in yeild grades as well..............so the next decade might look a bit different as packers are getting tired of the black outliners....namely 4's and 5's............So far the only way to solve that problem is to cross with continental bull

They should be cracking down on the outliers. 4s and 5s are docked heavily. But, sorry, using continental bulls is not the answer. Many Angus bulls offer negative backfat EPDs, plus management plays a key role in yield grade.


OK folks time to break out the shovels again. Is this a cyclical thing or do you just spew this crap when the mood strikes you. You KNOW darned good and well that using continental bulls on angus or hereford improves YG's. It has also been known to install some butt on them at the same time. Didn't we just see some results of a feedlot test where continentals actually won the darned thing and I believe those tests are based on a combination of Marbling and YG. Unless you have some info that Braunvieh are not continentals but actually Brown Angus

Step on some toes, did I? This article isn't about contests. It's about putting money in your pocket. Using Angus genetics has made producers, feedlots, and packers money. If they weren't making money on Angus genetics, they wouldn't use and/or pay more for them.

Using Continental bulls might help with YG, but I don't believe it's necessary. There are Angus bulls that will produce acceptable YGs AND marbling AND produce calves that meet specifications for the many branded beef programs that prefer Angus genetics.

I don't know. Did we just see some results of a feedlot test? Post the link to the official results so we can see the facts. Were they REAL Braunvieh or Angus crosses?

All the Braunvieh I've seen were black; so I asume they were crossed with Angus. But then Angus can improve lots of breeds. :lol: :lol:
 

HerefordSire

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Disregarding the published Angus top line data you have presented, which breed and or crosses are the most efficient for producers?
 
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Frankie

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HerefordSire":u5nj04to said:
Disregarding the published Angus top line data you have presented, which breed and or crosses are the most efficient for producers?

Efficient? Or productive? Or profitable? You're going to have to get more specific with your question.
 

Jovid

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Frankie":1mgn5pf7 said:
Demand grows for Angus calves

Calf prices have been up and down, but the Angus advantage keeps growing, even while supplies of Angus calves increased as a share of all cattle. That’s according to nine years of data in the Pfizer Animal Health-supported analysis of Superior Livestock video auction sales. (See also “Black bonus” for a detailed look at these values in the Northern Plains.)

Most of the calves sold on the video include data on breed type, which has always had an effect on sale price. Starting in this decade, data analysis began to break out and quantify those variables.

From 2000 through 2008, data on more than 3.3 million head in 27,472 lots show an upward trend line in the relative added value of calves that are primarily Angus, the top-value category each year.

Strict guidelines classified cattle based on seller description into one of five categories: mixed English or English crosses, English-Continental crosses, primarily Angus, black or black-whitefaced, and cattle with “ear.”

Mostly black English calves with less than a 90% share of black individuals only qualified as English/English crosses. Lots of black or black-whitefaced calves had to be at least 90% black hided, and primarily Angus calves had to be described as at least 90% Angus by the seller. Brangus calves that were 90% or more black were not included in the analyses.

Using that Brahman-influence “eared” category as a base, the study showed a range of premiums for all other types of calves from 2000 to 2008 (Figure 1). “Last year, the Angus bonus reached its highest on record, at $7.64 per hundredweight (cwt.),” notes Mark McCully, Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) assistant vice president for supply. The spread has ranged from a low of $4.60 in 2001 (see Figure 2).

The value of English-Continental crosses relative to primarily Angus remained fairly steady over time at a $2.50/cwt. to $2.70/cwt. discount. However, the volume share of Continental crosses faded from about half of the mix in 2000 to 32% in recent years. Meanwhile, the share of primarily Angus combined with black and black-whitefaced calves climbed from 16.6% in 2000 to 42.6% last year, McCully points out.

Sorry. The Tables won't copy. See them here:

http://www.angus.org/pub/newsroom/relea ... Grows.html


The problem I see with this data is the ones that were supposed to be Angus were determined to be Angus by the seller saying they were. It would appear to me that anything black the owner could say they were Angus.
 

ROB

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Frankie":z8f1sk3h said:
Step on some toes, did I? This article isn't about contests. It's about putting money in your pocket. Using Angus genetics has made producers, feedlots, and packers money. If they weren't making money on Angus genetics, they wouldn't use and/or pay more for them.

Using Continental bulls might help with YG, but I don't believe it's necessary. There are Angus bulls that will produce acceptable YGs AND marbling AND produce calves that meet specifications for the many branded beef programs that prefer Angus genetics.

I don't know. Did we just see some results of a feedlot test? Post the link to the official results so we can see the facts. Were they REAL Braunvieh or Angus crosses?

All the Braunvieh I've seen were black; so I asume they were crossed with Angus. But then Angus can improve lots of breeds. :lol: :lol:

frankie- this whole thread seems to be a contest with you :lol:

ROB
 

HerefordSire

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Frankie":27syhhig said:
HerefordSire":27syhhig said:
Disregarding the published Angus top line data you have presented, which breed and or crosses are the most efficient for producers?

Efficient? Or productive? Or profitable? You're going to have to get more specific with your question.


Encarta's definition will do...

capable of achieving the desired result with the minimum use of resources, time, and effort

http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/ ... =efficient
 
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Frankie

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HerefordSire":3b34gv4r said:
Frankie":3b34gv4r said:
HerefordSire":3b34gv4r said:
Disregarding the published Angus top line data you have presented, which breed and or crosses are the most efficient for producers?

Efficient? Or productive? Or profitable? You're going to have to get more specific with your question.


Encarta's definition will do...

capable of achieving the desired result with the minimum use of resources, time, and effort

http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/ ... =efficient

Then you have to define "desired result": feedlot, sale barn, rail, breeding stock.....
 

3waycross

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Well Frankie, as usual you are hoisted on your own petard.

The point was that continentals can help improve YG on Angus not the other way around.

Here is a quote from the information on the test

The champion steer posted an average daily gain of 4.569, yield grade of 2.23 and a “Choice-” quality grade. He placed seventh in the carcass division, fourth in rate-of-gain and was named the overall winner with the lowest combined scores. The champion steer was 5/8 Braunvieh and 3/8 Angus, out of a percentage Braunvieh cow and a Braunvieh bull.

Looks like we have to lock down another one eh' Frankie :nod: :cowboy:
 

HerefordSire

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Disregarding the published Angus top line data you have presented, which breed and or crosses are the most efficient for producers?

Encarta's definition of efficiency will do...

capable of achieving the desired result with the minimum use of resources, time, and effort

http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/ ... =efficient

Any or all of the following "desired results" will do....feedlot, sale barn, rail, breeding stock.
 

purecountry

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Don't get this whole breed argument, although it seems it will never end with some of you. If Angus works for some, great, and Braunvieh for others - congrats. I've made money off of many colors, shapes and sizes. The most consistent money makers all have one thing in common - type. NOT BREED, but TYPE. They all have lots of thickness, flesh, guts and girth.

We have Angus, AngusXShorthorn, AngusXHereford, AngusXGelbvieh, AngusXGalloway, AngusXTarentaise, and the majority presently is purebred Galloway. The highest and most consistent group are the AngusXTarentaise. They are our benchmark for everything else. Is it because of breed? Partially, but my feeling is that it's because they are all 1/2-3/4 sisters with many years of careful breeding and strict culling behind them. They all share the same phenotype, and are almost identical in their genotype.

It's nice to have a great deal of numbers and examples as a basis for comparison, however this study does have some holes in it, or should I say the conclusions being drawn here have some holes. Kinda like a little green tag scheme that runs on this side of the border. Are they Angus, or just black-hided?

As for the winning steer that's a Braunvieh influence, did it say in that trial how many days they were on feed and show feed conversion/NFE data?
 
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Frankie

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HerefordSire":3a8vb1jt said:
Any or all of the following "desired results" will do....feedlot, sale barn, rail, breeding stock.

Let me work through this. :) More Angus bulls are tested for feedlot performance than any other breed in the US. Bulls that gain well on test should produce steers that excel in the feedlot.

Sale barn? The Angus Assn has been running the "Where's the Premium" program for years. Consistently, year after year, Angus-influenced calves outsell similar calves around the country at the sale barns. And on video auction.

On the rail? The demand for "Angus" by the packers adds value to cattle sired by Angus bulls. Angus is known for marbling. Marbled beef is more valuable than non-marbled beef. More branded beef programs are built on Angus genetics than any other breed, thus those carcasses are more valuable.

Breeding stock? For the last several years, we've registered more animals than any other breed...by far. We sell more bulls; the Angus cow is the backbone of the US beef industry.

The answer is right in front of us: Angus, the Business Breed. :D
 

novatech

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purecountry said:
NOT BREED, but TYPE. They all have lots of thickness, flesh, guts and girth.

quote]
I could not agree more. There are a few ranches I would like to put a sign in front of with this.
The only problem I have seen with Angus (around here) is that people get into them because of repution/marketing. They do not have a clue as to what good or bad is. I have talked to some breeders that can do no more that quote numbers. When you look at their cattle you can hardly see them from the front or back.
Angus has the highest number of regesterd cattle. But how many would meet the TYPE requirments mentioned above?
I really feel like the breed has suffered % wise because of the marketing and the people buying into it.
Not to be biased,I have seen this sort of thing happen with other breeds as well, including mine. Just have seen a lot more of it with he Angus, there is just more of them.
 
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