Think she will make milk?

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farmerjan

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If she lets you put a halter on her, you could just tie her to a post in a barn where you could milk her.... she might just be a better cow than you realized. She also might not have gotten bred back very fast due to the poor condition....Udder's not the worst I've ever seen.... won't know til she calves....
 

Lucky_P

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Kenny,
I have never advocated using a pour-on dewormer for fly control... actually, I've railed against that practice here on these boards... it's misuse of the product that just speeds y'all faster down the road to selection of populations of nematode parasites resistant to that whole class of dewormers (macrocyclic lactones). Though I guess you could look at it as, "Well, we've already screwed the pooch on use of the MLs as an effective dewormer, might as well see how quickly we can select a population or hornflies that are resistant to them, too."
Pour-ons are the worst possible mode of administration... absorption is poor to begin with, and absorptive ability varies widely across breeds and individual animals. In a vast majority, they are not applied properly - how much ends up on the ground or on the sides of the chute?... and how many folks weigh their animals?... numerous trials have shown that even 'seasoned experts' are notoriously poor in judging actual weights of animals... too much underdosing going on.

Now, as to that cow... there might be Jersey in the woodpile, but she is NOT pure Jersey... no dished face or bug eyes... not much of an udder, either. That 'wild color' pattern can come from a whole lot of places... Red Angus, Tarentaise, Corriente, etc. She might make some milk, but I'm not betting on more than enough to raise her own calf.
 

Hereford2

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I feed my milk cows and my nurse cow 16% dairy. And anything else I am trying to put weight on. I can't stand when people buy animals and then put them out on ground that has tiny green patches in mostly dirt, and say how much they Love their animals and then they're shocked when the animals die... In my experience animal lovers are some of the worst abusers of animals...
 

Coosh71

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We have purchased so.e "sale barn" cows early on that we're pitiful sights. We vaccinated them, wormed them and kept them penned with hay and feed for a week before moving them to grass. Within 2-3 months they were unrecognizable. They looked just as far and productive as our others. We did not over feed etc. In the summer a good salt/mineral mix and green grass really does the trick. Makes you wonder how they were cared for beforehand. Either way I'm with the rest. Idk if she will make enough milk for multiple calves but if you keep doing what you're doing she will blow up and look nice with some fresh spring grass. Good luck. Post pics after spring grass comes in.
 

kenny thomas

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Kenny,
I have never advocated using a pour-on dewormer for fly control... actually, I've railed against that practice here on these boards... it's misuse of the product that just speeds y'all faster down the road to selection of populations of nematode parasites resistant to that whole class of dewormers (macrocyclic lactones). Though I guess you could look at it as, "Well, we've already screwed the pooch on use of the MLs as an effective dewormer, might as well see how quickly we can select a population or hornflies that are resistant to them, too."
Pour-ons are the worst possible mode of administration... absorption is poor to begin with, and absorptive ability varies widely across breeds and individual animals. In a vast majority, they are not applied properly - how much ends up on the ground or on the sides of the chute?... and how many folks weigh their animals?... numerous trials have shown that even 'seasoned experts' are notoriously poor in judging actual weights of animals... too much underdosing going on.

Now, as to that cow... there might be Jersey in the woodpile, but she is NOT pure Jersey... no dished face or bug eyes... not much of an udder, either. That 'wild color' pattern can come from a whole lot of places... Red Angus, Tarentaise, Corriente, etc. She might make some milk, but I'm not betting on more than enough to raise her own calf.
I apologize for my statement on the fly control but it has always stuck in my head what your thoughts were on pour on wormer.
 
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MurraysMutts

MurraysMutts

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We have purchased so.e "sale barn" cows early on that we're pitiful sights. We vaccinated them, wormed them and kept them penned with hay and feed for a week before moving them to grass. Within 2-3 months they were unrecognizable. They looked just as far and productive as our others. We did not over feed etc. In the summer a good salt/mineral mix and green grass really does the trick. Makes you wonder how they were cared for beforehand. Either way I'm with the rest. Idk if she will make enough milk for multiple calves but if you keep doing what you're doing she will blow up and look nice with some fresh spring grass. Good luck. Post pics after spring grass comes in.
Will definitely post pics as she goes. Something wrong with me, but I love having a project or 2 around...
Long as she puts a calf out and raises it I'll be perfectly fine with that. Lol
If she makes extra milk all the better!

@Hereford2 I agree!
Some folks just need to try a lil harder or realize they can't do what they are trying to do.
 

Coosh71

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Absolutely. We have had older cows that never kept great condition (genetics) I guess, but man they poured every ounce of crass and cake into some nice calves. There a million ways to raise beef. Find what works for you and enjoy the life.
 

Lucky_P

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No prob, KT.
Sat in on a few parasitology webinars this week.
When the macrocyclic lactone dewormers (ivermectin types) came on the market, they had 99+% efficacy against Ostertagia(brown stomach worm)... today, that efficacy has dropped to about 6%... virtually no longer effective on many premises.
Those pour-ons were approved/licensed back in the day when effectiveness was high... but no longer. Add to that, differences in absorption between animals and the greater issue of 'misapplication' - improper dosing, improper application (needs to be applied along topline from withers to tailhead - not just squirted at/on the animal - pour-on on the ground or sides of the chute doesn't do anything ) to animal with dry clean unmatted haircoat. Use of pour-ons for fly control has played a big role in pushing us rapidly down the road to irreversible anthelminthic resistance to all members of this class of dewormers.
 

Stocker Steve

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Sat in on a few parasitology webinars this week.
When the macrocyclic lactone dewormers (ivermectin types) came on the market, they had 99+% efficacy against Ostertagia(brown stomach worm)... today, that efficacy has dropped to about 6%... virtually no longer effective on many premises.
I buy a lot of mismanaged cattle so I might be OK with ivemectin, but what are they recommending now?
 
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MurraysMutts

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Yeah...
I figure shes never seen a dose of wormer in her life.
I knew her weight and it was applied correctly. Shes pretty dang chill, but not a pet. Doesnt want touched etc..

Shes ready morning and evening for her rations tho! Figure I'll keep her penned a while yet and feed her til I figure out what else I wanna do.
She wouldnt go in the trailer (temporary shelter from this weather) until I fed her in it yesterday so I could get hay put out for e1 else. Gotta go thru the pen to get to the pasture. Lol
Today she was in the trailer this morning. Finally decided she has had enough of the cold cold wind I guess!

20210214_090349.jpg
 
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MurraysMutts

MurraysMutts

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@farmerjan
@Stocker Steve

Shes definitely not halter broke. Shes calming right down tho. She will let me scratch and rub her a bit while eating at the bunk. Heartbreaking loving on an animal that's in such poor condition. U can feel every rib and bone in her body. 😢
Still a bit skittish. How do u halter break a 1000 lb cow??

I've been feeding her about 9 pounds of 20% cubes twice a day. And all the hay she wants. I almost feel like I should be feeding more.
 

farmerjan

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Do you have a chute you can get her in? Get a halter and attach a leadrope....I braid baling strings to make lead ropes, $2-3.00 snap in the end. I usually braid it with double strings to make it stronger....typical simple" 3 string braid" .... get it on her and let her drag the lead. She will step on it and get a couple of "comeuppances". Make it 6-10 ft long for when you want to tie her. Then one day you get ahold of it when she is close to a STOUT post. tie her and let her fight it. Some quit real quick, some don't.
Realize you have only had her a short time. If she figured out that going in the trailer after you put hay in there, and then went in out of the wind, proves she is not stubbornly stupid.

I think that is plenty of feed. You don't want her calf to get too big from the increased nutrition. With dairy in her, she is going to be more "angular" anyway. Plenty of hay is cruicial.... she will gain when the weather let's up so that she is not eating to just fuel her being able to keep up body heat.
 
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MurraysMutts

MurraysMutts

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So kinda like halter training a calf! Interesting...
Bet I could feed her by a tree one of these days.

So no more feed then?
I'm at less than 2% of body weight.
Agreed. Dont wanna overdo it. I know all the feed has been going to keep her warm here lately.

Sounds like I should just continue with adequate, sufficient etc...
 

farmerjan

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Maybe a little real good hay extra....alfalfa or a real good timothy? I wouldn't get the grain too much. She is not going to look good as fast as a feeder would, with her having that fetus growing inside.... adequate to good.... not too rich. Maybe up it a little.... I feed my jerseys in milk about a 1/2 5 gal bucket a feeding.... about 10-12 lbs feed... when they are fresh with 3 calves on them... but they don't start out with the strike against them. I think she looks pretty decent considering.
 

Warren Allison

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This category of the forum doesnt get explored a lot. Last post was wayyy back on October. Figured I'd go buy a "milk cow" and liven the place up.

Just picked up this gal fairly cheap. 5x5
I think shes got a bit of jersey. My thoughts are to put a couple extras on her after she calves. Have to see how she does I guess.
What yall think?

Dont pay any mind to the aspiring pot farmer neighbors...
View attachment 2068View attachment 2069
I think she is probably 1/2 Red Angus...or even a Bb Black Angus...and 1/2 Longhorn or Corriente. Had to be Angus that polled her, and her body type looks more Criollo than Jersey to me.
 

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