Stretched out bull

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searoach

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Hello everybody this is my bull and I have noticed him stretching out real hard. I do not have time to stand in the pasture to watch if he pisses.but I watched him urinate for about a minute and a half just the other day and it was strong. Because one person suggested that he was bound up with bladder stones. So I went to the feed store and bought ammonium sulfate and put it in his food for 90 days.I was also given advice that he may have a hoof rott but his hoofs look good.
What is worrisome to me is when his legs are stretched out it seems like his feet hurt because they quiver as he moves them forward to put pressure on them and sometimes the muscles in his rump look like they are quivering.
Maybe he is not stretching out as hard as he was before the ammonium sulfate. But I do not want to continue doing something that is not helping or there is another remedy.
Thank you all in advance from Florida best wishes
 

A.J.

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Is he able to walk normally or does he walk around like that all the time? Is he losing condition? It’s hard to tell based off of one picture. I would recommend having the vet come out and do an exam. Usually if they quiver like that, they are in a lot of pain. When my bull got stifled he would stretch out when he tried to walk and his whole body would start shaking and he would almost fall over.
 

Boot Jack Bulls

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A number of causes may make him "park out" like this. It's unlikely at his age and being intact that UC (urinary calculi) is the issue. Foot issues may cause them to take a unusual stance, but if you closely, when he parks like this, he's actually putting tons of pressure on his toes and its affecting both feet. If it is a hoof issue, I'd suspect hoof rot. Honestly, my first impression is that he has a spinal injury. Kissing spine will cause a horse to park out to relieve spinal pressure. I have a cow that is stifled, and she quivers like you describe sometimes, but never parks out. Definitely worth a vet call. Stifled animals have a shelf life and a stifled bull is pretty much useless....
 
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searoach

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Is he able to walk normally or does he walk around like that all the time? Is he losing condition? It’s hard to tell based off of one picture. I would recommend having the vet come out and do an exam. Usually if they quiver like that, they are in a lot of pain. When my bull got stifled he would stretch out when he tried to walk and his whole body would start shaking and he would almost fall over.
He walks around normal no issues from what I can see he has bread a cow eats and drinks well but when he stands he starts stretching out
 
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searoach

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A number of causes may make him "park out" like this. It's unlikely at his age and being intact that UC (urinary calculi) is the issue. Foot issues may cause them to take a unusual stance, but if you closely, when he parks like this, he's actually putting tons of pressure on his toes and its affecting both feet. If it is a hoof issue, I'd suspect hoof rot. Honestly, my first impression is that he has a spinal injury. Kissing spine will cause a horse to park out to relieve spinal pressure. I have a cow that is stifled, and she quivers like you describe sometimes, but never parks out. Definitely worth a vet call. Stifled animals have a shelf life and a stifled bull is pretty much useless....
Ouch, I reached out to a vet and he gave me his prices and I fell off the chair.The reason I am reaching out to everybody with hopes of a remedy because I cannot Afford a vet at this time at this time. The reason I cannot afford a vet is because I fell off the roof and have not made a penny since last March 2020.
 

Boot Jack Bulls

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Really, if you can't get a vet to look at him, we are all just shooting in the dark here. You could treat him for foot rot, it may help, it may not. The reality is, if he has a stifle injury or spinal issue, a truck to the sale barn is the only thing that will help him. In my experience, big old bulls are a time bomb. Don't get me wrong, I have and have used many, including an 11 year old that went on the truck last fall at 2400 pounds for no other reason than that he was showing his age and I couldn't risk him having a tough time in the winter and being on the bench this spring. Once those big, older bulls start showing weakness, whether it be lower fertility, foot or leg issues, loss of athleticism, decreased drive, ect, it gets harder and harder to maintain them or justify keeping them around....
 
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