Longhorn Angus or Maine Crossbreeding

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Anonymous

I am presently raising Longhorns and am looking to the future. I have a grandson, who will be of 4-H age in 3 years. Our fairboard has a rule that states "all cattle must be dehorned." I refuse to de-horn one of my Longhorns to show at the fair. Iam considering buying an Angus or Maine heifer calf and breeding it to my bull for the grand son to show. When it becomes of age. Anyone have any experience with the above crosses? What are the advantages of each breed as far as temperment? Would be open to other breeds to cross to. I am moving torwards AI for the 2004 breeding season, so I don't believe the investment would be a total loss. I may find I like the other breed. Thank you.

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OP
A

Anonymous

The thing to remember is, unless the cow is homozygous polled you could still get horns

dunmovin farms

> I am presently raising Longhorns
> and am looking to the future. I
> have a grandson, who will be of
> 4-H age in 3 years. Our fairboard
> has a rule that states "all
> cattle must be dehorned." I
> refuse to de-horn one of my
> Longhorns to show at the fair. Iam
> considering buying an Angus or
> Maine heifer calf and breeding it
> to my bull for the grand son to
> show. When it becomes of age.
> Anyone have any experience with
> the above crosses? What are the
> advantages of each breed as far as
> temperment? Would be open to other
> breeds to cross to. I am moving
> torwards AI for the 2004 breeding
> season, so I don't believe the
> investment would be a total loss.
> I may find I like the other breed.
> Thank you.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> The thing to remember is, unless
> the cow is homozygous polled you
> could still get horns

> dunmovin farms

Thanks for the responds. We would be hoping for a bull calf the first year steerer it to show in the market class. I would not have a problem de-horning that animal. I have a problem with de-horning a Longhorn to show in the market class. It would not do justice to my breed and we would not have much chance of placing above last going up against the English breds. I am presently working to get a ruling change with out much success.

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OP
A

Anonymous

Have you considered just buying a good polled (or dehorned) steer for your grandson when he's old enough to join 4-H? I think the no horns rule is for the kid's safety and, hopefully, they won't waive it. An Angus bull will take the horns off most breeds. You'll sometimes get them with Brahman/Angus cattle. But he'll have a hard time competing with any Longhorn cross in the market class. Good luck....

> I am presently raising Longhorns
> and am looking to the future. I
> have a grandson, who will be of
> 4-H age in 3 years. Our fairboard
> has a rule that states "all
> cattle must be dehorned." I
> refuse to de-horn one of my
> Longhorns to show at the fair. Iam
> considering buying an Angus or
> Maine heifer calf and breeding it
> to my bull for the grand son to
> show. When it becomes of age.
> Anyone have any experience with
> the above crosses? What are the
> advantages of each breed as far as
> temperment? Would be open to other
> breeds to cross to. I am moving
> torwards AI for the 2004 breeding
> season, so I don't believe the
> investment would be a total loss.
> I may find I like the other breed.
> Thank you.

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> How about one more suggestion. Compete in the carcass comp. this is a true test of your breed not just a beauty contest and horns no longer are a concern. P.S. I have been stepped on, stomped on, mashed in chutes and trailers , and bashed in gates over the last 20 years, the only reason that I have seen that makes sense for horns (except selling them for lots of money to put on the front of cadillacs) is a few horned cattle mixed into a herd will move the one onrey gate blocker right on through the gate when they are being pushed from behind
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Wouldnt it just be better to buy a calf now so that it can be raised by the boy him self. This way the boy learns responsibility & the calf knows him. You have a better chance to get a well tempered steer if you raise it from a calf & train it for show.

> Have you considered just buying a
> good polled (or dehorned) steer
> for your grandson when he's old
> enough to join 4-H? I think the no
> horns rule is for the kid's safety
> and, hopefully, they won't waive
> it. An Angus bull will take the
> horns off most breeds. You'll
> sometimes get them with
> Brahman/Angus cattle. But he'll
> have a hard time competing with
> any Longhorn cross in the market
> class. Good luck....

[email protected]
 
OP
A

Anonymous

I raise registered Texas Longhorns but also have a few beef cows. Haven't had a horned calf yet from my CharolaisxLonghorn crosses. And they are every bit as beefy and built as any beef calf you will find.
 

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