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Letting a cow go is hard, any 1 by me on dat?

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Anonymous

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I recently showed a cow from my school, Jake, or I shoulld say polled hereford steer. I miss him soo much. do you agree letting a cow go is a sad and hard thing?
 

Cattle Rack Rancher

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I was in 4-H as a youngster and I found that it helps if you name your calf Tuition or Truck or Dinner or when you get to be my age Alimony :D . It helps you keep focused on what you are raising that calf for.
 
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Anonymous

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I am still boycotting Mc Donalds (3months) since I sold my old cow. I feel for you...I still miss her!
 

Texan

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Anonymous":1nhv2hbx said:
I am still boycotting Mc Donalds (3months) since I sold my old cow. I feel for you...I still miss her!

Real smart on the boycott idea. If everybody did that, then we could all give them away instead of selling them! Unbelievable.
 

Bez

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My daughter raised a Grand Champion steer.

She named it "Lotsa' Moolah"!!

I think she still has a clipping of his tail attached to the trophy.

She cried when it went off to the big slaughter house in the sky. I knew she was well on the road to recovery when she asked me the next day, "Dad, when do you think the cheque will arrive?"

:D :D :D

Bez
 

TexasCountryWoman

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I know livestock is livestock, but I love each and every one. I feel like I am their mother, their caretaker, their keeper, their beastmaster. They are my children, my produce, my product. I know their mothers, their grandmothers and their greatgrandmothers. Each one has a story and a personality. I give them the happiest life I can while on the farm, knowing that farm animals are created to serve mankind. I pray for them when they leave here for market, hoping they will not be too afraid, knowing they had good, happy lives. Many people are not as happy as many cows are.
 

Double R Ranch

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It is nice to hear that I am not the only emotional catttleman (or women in this case) I have been known to keep the ones that I am really attached to until they are older and meaner. I still can not be at the auction on the days that I have cows in. Unfortunitly I used to work at the auction so I know most of the buyers #'s. Makes it kind of hard.
P.S. Names like Tri-Tip. T-Bone surloin are used regularly around these parts.
 

dun

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Double R Ranch":1wgeqaq2 said:
It is nice to hear that I am not the only emotional catttleman (or women in this case) I have been known to keep the ones that I am really attached to until they are older and meaner. I still can not be at the auction on the days that I have cows in. Unfortunitly I used to work at the auction so I know most of the buyers #'s. Makes it kind of hard.
P.S. Names like Tri-Tip. T-Bone surloin are used regularly around these parts.

Old granny slipped her calf last year. When I told my better 3/4 that Granny should go down the road I was informed in no uncertain terms that Granny will be here till she dies. I'll admit it was kind of a relief to have the hard decision taken out of my hands.

dun
 

sidney411

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We have had two bottle calves in the last 2 years and we named them Hamburger and T-bone.

We had a granny cow that lost her last calf but I just couldn't bring my heart to sell her since she was the matriarc of the herd and the last holstein on the ranch from the old dairy days she was 15 or 16 yrs old, I'm not exactly sure because her tattoo could no longer be read. She stayed in the hay-trap so she didn't have to walk around a lot since she had a small limp also. We put a yearling bull in with her for a while and since she wasn't cycling we thought it would be ok but it was our mistake, he jumped her and she went down on the coldest, sleeting rain night of the year. We went out with the tractor and tried to get her on her feet but some part in the rear end just was not working like it should so we had to put her down because I couldn't let her lay out there and suffer in the cold wet ground. We all cried - it was the end of a generation, the end of a lifestyle that we can not go back to a simplier time long gone.
 
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Anonymous

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...during my first couple years in 4-H (30 years ago) it was really difficult to say good-bye to my steers and pigs. For several days following the fair I would walk around home in a funk, missing my livestock. But I think around my third year of 4-H it was a lot easier to load the animals on the truck to go to the slaughter plant (I was thinking more about when the check would arrive).

I must admit however, that it can be a little sad still today seeing a favorite cow being loaded up to head to the stockyards because of poor feet, being open, etc.

Any of these animal rights folks who just think livestock producers are cold-hearted thugs without feelings just don't get it.
 
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Anonymous

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Yep said:
I think around my third year of 4-H it was a lot easier to load the animals on the truck to go to the slaughter plant

I showed steers for 9 years and cried every year!
 

hillbilly

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hey yep if you lived in missouri your name would be yup.

I've had a half a dozen cows die of old age on my place through the years.
If they are an outstanding cow it's hard to let them go. Under normal conditions you get $350 or $375, I always want one more good heifer out of them.
Most of them I have no trouble shipping.
Just a sentamental fool I spose.
Hillbilly
 

Michelle Pankonien

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It never gets any easier. This past year I sold the first female I ever purchased, she was 14, had lost many teeth, and was producing moderate milk to raise her calf, with suppliment she got it done, i loved Her, she was "Punken", she had a big Punkin head and a buldozer type nose, We still have many daughters, all as great as her, and one who looks like her twin, they are a part of our lives and shape us as much as we shape them with every quirk and oddity, the laughs and the times they bring us to tears, and when they make us so mad you burst out laughing because we let a"COW" get our feathers ruffled

I tried to always rationalize, steers are for meat, " We raise them for this purpose", until the time my first heifer got hurt, and the vet said "I don'tant to give her anything" I want to buy her and put her in the freezer, so he did, and from what we had paid for her we made a good profit, and it made the hurt a little less painful "for me anyway"
 
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Anonymous

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look my uncle has this cow she will be mine one day hopefully and we she goes to cow heaven i dont know what ill do
 

TheBullLady

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hehe...what a bunch of softies we are, huh??

I shipped a 15 year old Murray Gray cow this summer that I raised on a bottle.. and it about killed me. With the cattle prices they way they are, I couldn't justify keeping a bunch of the older cows any longer. Of course, I also have a 9 year old Brahman steer in the yard that his only saving grace is that he adorns all my business cards! He was destined for the freezer 8 years ago.

It's very tough sometimes.. and it's sure good to see that I'm not the only one that thinks that way. When you consider how much time we spend with them, it's hard not to get attached to some of them.
 

Rustler9

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I've got two old Beefmaster cross cows that I've decided that will just die on the farm-the way I look at it, they have served me well. I have sold numerous calves from them-I raised them and have kept a heifer from each of them. One is 15 and the other is twelve. The fifteen year old (Betsy) raised a dandy heifer last year from one of my big Longhorn bulls and I was hoping she wouldn't breed back again but I believe she has. I just don't feel right in selling them for $300.00 and letting them go to the bologna factory after all they've done for me.
 

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