injured foot

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Anonymous

I have a two year old heifer who is limping badly on her back leg. Her foot is swelled, I see no pus or anything. I'm not sure if she stepped on something, sprained or hoof rot(someone please define). She is not handleable(if that is a word) and we don't have a shoot or anything to contain her in to check it out. I have had her penned up out of the mud for the last couple of day. Is there something i can give her as a preventive measure. The vet we use, will not work on a animal not contained, an he's the only one we know. I'm assuming she's bred by now. Any thoughts?

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Anonymous

Sounds like it might be hoof rot, especially if she has been in a lot of water and mud. If it’s hoof rot it will stink. Whether it’s that or something else is hard to tell unless you can look at it up close.

Either way you need to get some antibiotics in her. It’s awfully hard to doctor an animal that big without a chute. If you have a GOOD STRONG post you could bait her over to it with some cake and slip a rope over her head and snub it. Then you might be able to get a shot in her.

For the sake of clarity, that was a very poor description of a very excellent way to get hurt. Don’t underestimate how mad she will get and how fast and strong she is in spite of her hurt leg.

Craig
 
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Anonymous

The more I think about what I said above the more I wish I hadn’t posted it. Let me add a little more detail on how to (not) get hurt. The GOOD STRONG post should be part of a good strong corral fence. You should work from over the fence. You stay on your side and she stays on hers. Don’t try to work through the fence unless you like broken arms. Work over the fence. If the fence is not good and strong, forget it.

Don’t snub to a post that’s out in the open (such as a post holding up the roof of a lean-to) unless you are prepared to heel her with another rope which you should not do unless you know what you are doing. And don’t use a fence post that is not big and stout. I’ve done a fair amount of work in the past where we used snubbing posts in the middle of a lot but that was primarily for working calves. Now a days I’m too old and not desperate enough for money. Here you are talking about working a grown heifer. That two year old might be very gentle but if she is hurting and/or being restrained she can sure hurt you.

I should have never posted that response.

Craig
 
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Anonymous

Oh it was okay to post that. We have caught on to things not to do when we have to work with a cow, which isn't to often which is a good thing i guess. We often practice caution novices that we are. But i'm thinking if i tick the hubby off, and tie her somewhere sturdy we might get by. (amazing strength when angered). But on a more serious note what kind of antibotic, be specific. I'm blond! Thank you for answering. The more I think about what I said
> above the more I wish I hadn’t
> posted it. Let me add a little
> more detail on how to (not) get
> hurt. The GOOD STRONG post should
> be part of a good strong corral
> fence. You should work from over
> the fence. You stay on your side
> and she stays on hers. Don’t try
> to work through the fence unless
> you like broken arms. Work over
> the fence. If the fence is not
> good and strong, forget it.

> Don’t snub to a post that’s out in
> the open (such as a post holding
> up the roof of a lean-to) unless
> you are prepared to heel her with
> another rope which you should not
> do unless you know what you are
> doing. And don’t use a fence post
> that is not big and stout. I’ve
> done a fair amount of work in the
> past where we used snubbing posts
> in the middle of a lot but that
> was primarily for working calves.
> Now a days I’m too old and not
> desperate enough for money. Here
> you are talking about working a
> grown heifer. That two year old
> might be very gentle but if she is
> hurting and/or being restrained
> she can sure hurt you.

> I should have never posted that
> response.

> Craig

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Anonymous

LA200 should be fine. There are others out there that would also be fine but LA200 is one of the most frequently used for fever and/or hoof rot.

The label will guide you on dosage and administration. In this case safety is more important than getting the perfect injection site.

Craig
 
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Anonymous

There are air rifles that are made administrating darts such as tranqualizers, they also work for injecting antibiotics. I saw one the other day that is a blowgun, i.e. mouth/lung powered.

dunmovin farms

> LA200 should be fine. There are
> others out there that would also
> be fine but LA200 is one of the
> most frequently used for fever
> and/or hoof rot.

> The label will guide you on dosage
> and administration. In this case
> safety is more important than
> getting the perfect injection
> site.

> Craig
 
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Anonymous

Well, I am blond too, and all previus advice very good. Nuflr is also labeled for Foot Rot. May be able to use one dose, but more expensive.

It may not be possible, but getting her out of a muddy area will also aide in reducing risk to her other feet and the other animals in the herd if there are any. We have been under water for the last 2 weeks, so finding a place with little or no mud would be very hard. Good luck.

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