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How do you de-bark a pine tree?

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skyhightree1

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what are you doing with the debarked pine tree? I ask cause if I had to do any sizable tree id probably use an Alaskan sawmill and square it off.
 

Dave

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There is a tool called a spud that will work somewhat faster than a draw knife. Mostly because you are standing up and pushing it so you can put your weight into it rather than just arm strength. Also when the sap is first running in the spring the bark will slip easier although I have hear there are issues with curing the log that time of year.
 
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True Grit Farms

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skyhightree1":3i8xmkuw said:
what are you doing with the debarked pine tree? I ask cause if I had to do any sizable tree id probably use an Alaskan sawmill and square it off.

I have a Farm Boss 36 saw mill for cutting lumber. I'm making beams, rafters and poles for a rustic looking front porch. It's turning into quite the project and I haven't even got started good. Hunting season closes on the 8th, so till then I'm just skinning a log or two a day
 

wlamarparmer

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Friend has built two pole barns, outdoor patio/pool deck (approx 20 X 30), and is now working on a rustic cabin using debarked pines. He uses the debarking tool that fits on chainsaw, and uses planer blades (4 inch I think)
Does nice work.
 

wbvs58

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What about belting them with the back of an axe to bruise them then they start to peel off. I don't know about pine but works with all our Eucalypt hard woods.

Ken
 
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True Grit Farms

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M-5":3rlba39f said:
Log Wizard Chainsaw Attachment Installation: http://youtu.be/XJfkWgIx9eI

I watched all the videos on how to de-bark a pine tree. I tried the pressure washer and long handle roofing scraper and the draw knife works best for me. I was hoping someone on here had used a log wizard type tool for some real feed back. It looks like it would be hard to keep from dipping and gouging the wood. I guess I'll order one today and see for myself, after all a person can't ever have to many tools.
 

greybeard

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My father told me a dozen times how he de-barked hundreds and hundreds of pine logs with a draw knife--for $30 a month. CCC camp out in Colorado--1930s.
I have a draw knife, and tried it. I quickly (and again) came to the conclusion I ain't nearly the man he was.
 

Supa Dexta

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How old are the logs?

You want to peel wihtin a few days of cutting if you can, esp in spring when its the easiest. A peeling spud works well. Also soaking them in a pond for a while helps.
 

Nesikep

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How big are the logs? You can get fence post peelers that handle up to 10" logs or so and will sharpen a point on them as well...

Pine isn't known for resistance to rot, so I'd be cautious about using it on a building, especially if it can get wet.. Cedar and fir would be my choices around here, though I don't know if that's in the cards for you
 

M-5

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Nesikep":3ralnq9b said:
How big are the logs? You can get fence post peelers that handle up to 10" logs or so and will sharpen a point on them as well...

Pine isn't known for resistance to rot, so I'd be cautious about using it on a building, especially if it can get wet.. Cedar and fir would be my choices around here, though I don't know if that's in the cards for you

damn I wish someone would have told all those folks in the 1800's not to use pine to build cabins with. im surprised some of them are still standing after a 100 yrs or so.
 

Nesikep

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maybe your pine is different than what we have here, but if it gets wet it rots in a few years.. seasoned fir here is so hard you have to predrill if you want to put a nail in it, it's hard like rock
 
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True Grit Farms

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Nesikep":1izukjap said:
maybe your pine is different than what we have here, but if it gets wet it rots in a few years.. seasoned fir here is so hard you have to predrill if you want to put a nail in it, it's hard like rock

Pine is not the best but for the choices we have available her it's the best. I have long needle pine and it's the best of the pine trees for hardness and rot resistance.
How long do I need to keep them in the pond for Supa Dexta?
 

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