Broken Leg

Help Support CattleToday:

Victoria

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2005
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern Alberta Canada
Hi Chuckie. I am new to the board but I have had 2 experiences with hip lifters. One was on a first calf heifer that pinched a nerve while calving. Took about a month of lifting every day but she made it through. The other one we never did figure out what was wrong with her, had the vet out but it was just one of those things. That cow was only a few days.
Never had a cow heal from a broken leg though, just gave one a chance and had to finally put her down. I do hope this cow works out for your friend. My fear, even if the leg appears to heal well, would be next breeding season. As talented as your friend's wife is on people I would think a vet should look at her. Cows and humans aren't the same and it's nice to get a professional opinion sometimes. Especially about the weight of the bull. Sounds to me like your friend is the type that tries to take care of his animals and somehow I don't think he would be happy to have a bull climb on her and hear the leg snap again. :(
 

Cattle Rack Rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2004
Messages
1,605
Reaction score
0
Location
Manitoba, Canada
I don't think he would be happy to have a bull climb on her and hear the leg snap again.

Yeah, that's exactly the kind of thing that can cause other things to snap. Then he'll be out a cow and a bull. If he gets her back to walking which I'd question, I'd ship her as soon as she weans her calf.
 

Workinonit Farm

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 4, 2004
Messages
7,161
Reaction score
15
Location
Ctrl Virginia
Chuckie, good luck with your friend's cow. BTW nice avatar, a bit nicer than the other one. (although there have been days when I felt like that chuckie doll looked ;-) )

Katherine
 

docgraybull

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 18, 2004
Messages
397
Reaction score
0
Victoria":1opy90d4 said:
Especially about the weight of the bull. Sounds to me like your friend is the type that tries to take care of his animals and somehow I don't think he would be happy to have a bull climb on her and hear the leg snap again. :(

He could easily AI her instead and then sell her bred, or calve her out again. Could probably do it right there in the hip huggers/sling. But....that's a ways down the road, first she's got to live, then survive birthing, etc.
 
OP
Chuckie

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 13, 2004
Messages
4,141
Reaction score
0
Location
Tennessee
There are many things to be considered with this cow and the treatment and the outcome. I think the first thing he wants to do is get her back on her feet. Then he will figure out what to do from there. He is like myself. He needs to learn to A.I. as soon as possible. Then the need of experience comes next. I am always repeating what I read on this forum that I find of usefulness and he listens. I will continue to pass on words of encouragement and I hope she heals OK. The way he talked, it was a clean break. I would like to have seen her this past weekend and maybe this coming weekend I can get up there and take a picture of the cast. The heifer I stayed home to watch is still lugging her baby around. :mad:
 

Victoria

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2005
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern Alberta Canada
Chuckie and docgraybull: I guess I am just the type that likes to know the percentage of success before I start anything. You are right though first thing is first. AI would work, I don't tend to think of it first, just got into purebreds, never AI'ed a commercial cow.

Cattle Rack Rancher: Good point, I was thinking of just the cow but it sure could be a problem for the bull too.
 
OP
Chuckie

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 13, 2004
Messages
4,141
Reaction score
0
Location
Tennessee
I wish I had a large number of nice commercial cows that I could AI. Some really nice bulls' straws sell very reasonably, and without the certificate, you could bring any bloodline you needed to replace your cows with the new heifers. Then if they give volume discounts, it would be cheaper than buying a bull, hauling him home, and feeding him. Dun AI's his commercial cows. I am like you are on the odds of something working if it involves a lot of money and my total livlihood. But with one animal, I would try to beat the odds if I had the time, good resources, and some knowledge Mostly if the animal seemed to have a positive reaction to the treatment.
 

Victoria

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 7, 2005
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
0
Location
Southern Alberta Canada
For breeding it just seems easier to let the bulls do it for 73 cows. Cheaper too when we keep the bulls on for a few years. Of course it would be nice to not have to deal with them ever.... ;-)

We just got 8 purebreds though and we will be looking into doing the whole AI think for them eventually. Our bulls are purebreds too so we let them have calves (hopefully heifers) by them first.

It does depend on the cow. Must admitt right now we are busy healing up my favourite cow (our leader and boss) who somehow lost the end of her tongue. We can't figure out how she did it. Checked the waterers and they are fine. She isn't stupid so we don't get it. Anyhow, she is eating and drinking fine, still a little sore but off pain killers now.:) Of course we don't know how well she'll be able to eat short grass but she is worth supplementing in the future if we need to.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 9, 2004
Messages
12,414
Reaction score
1,394
Location
Central Upstate New York
Chuckie, being fairly new on the board - I rely of the avatar to "recognize" people. Your's is a major change. I wasn't sure it was the same "Chuckie". The old avatar gave a different impression on what you posted :D
 
OP
Chuckie

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 13, 2004
Messages
4,141
Reaction score
0
Location
Tennessee
Thanks Jeanne. I did that for Texas Show Mom. She said my name reminded her fo the movie with the killer doll. So, I couldn't resist attatching it. I got tired of looking at it myself. Victoria, I am going the same route you are this year till I learn a bit more. I may not be able to AI all of the cows, but I would like to start doing it myself. I bought a few registered cows this year to start upping the genetics. I bought a bull, but can't pick him up until the first of March. I hope to make some changes.
I can't imagine how your cow lost her tongue. Ouch! I imagine you'll never find the end of it since some possum had a meal of it. I would be looking everywhere too.
 
OP
Chuckie

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 13, 2004
Messages
4,141
Reaction score
0
Location
Tennessee
I talked to the man with the cow. He told me that she is standing on both of her back legs now. He said she is putting weight on it. He said that when he puts her in the sling, she wants to fold her front legs like when holding a dog, instead of putting them down on the ground to help hold her up. She works her front legs OK. So, I don't know what is up with that. When he puts the feed where she can't reach it, then she starts walking toward it. She still has a good appetite and everything is going well. He said that he let her down a little bit ago, and she rolled over on her side, and he picked her back up. He is going back out to let her down for the night. Maybe I can get a picture of the cast this weekend if I can get out that way.
 
OP
Chuckie

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 13, 2004
Messages
4,141
Reaction score
0
Location
Tennessee
This week the cow is still doing well. She is putting all her weight on the leg with the cast and the other back leg too. She can use all four of her legs, but hesitates to use her front legs when in the sling. She wants to curl them under her like a dog in your arms. But when he sets her down, she uses them to pull herself up when he raises her back up. The man that owns this cow said that he is going to make her put weight on all four of her legs standing up. He has her on a tractor front end loader attatched to a sling that goes in front of her legs and under just behind her front legs. She is still stuffing everything in her mouth that you put in front of her. Hay, grain and water. He says she seems pretty contented as she is. I think he is going to make her start exercising her limbs more now. Time for physical theropy.
 

tapeworm

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 9, 2005
Messages
627
Reaction score
0
That sounds good Chuckie. Glad its working out. Wouldnt be this far along if you had just shot the cow would you. The slings sometimes cause trouble with using front legs...either use the hook lifts instead or try backing the sling up some toward her belly...if the sling is right behind the legs they dont want to use them
 
OP
Chuckie

Chuckie

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 13, 2004
Messages
4,141
Reaction score
0
Location
Tennessee
Tapeworm, Thanks for the information on the sling. That probably is the reason she is folding her legs in the sling. I will be sure to call and tell him what you wrote. I am glad to hear there is a reason she has been folding them. Katherine, I will post as I learn more.
 

Latest posts

Top