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Why do some vaccs bumps not go away?

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BARNSCOOP

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I did a search on here and found that several people, like me, have giving vaccs and had lumps left behind. I gave shots to some calves on July 2nd and a few still have lumps as of yesterday August 14th. How long does it take for them to go away and if they don't, Why not? Does an injectable dewormer cause this also?
 

Bez+

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I can honestly say that I have never experienced this - only heard about it.

I have a belief that is may have something to do with either technique, location of other outside influence.

Been with cattle for a long time now and my grey hair shows it - what little I have left.

Bez+
 

DavisBeefmasters

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By any chance did one of the shots you gave have a multitude of things + tetanus in it?

A fellow breeder of ours has said they have switched from using vaccines with tetanus in it and giving the tetanus shot seperately.

Some of their cattle have vaccination bumps that are permanent.

I have a few that have permanent bumps and it is from my own bad technique at shot giving in the "early" years.
 

2/B or not 2/B

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I thought the bumps were caused by an allergic reaction by some animals to the carrier in the vaccine? They do seem more sensitive to some than others. But if there are techniques that can reduce them, I'd like to know. We inject sub Q in the neck. We use combo vaccines, like Alpha 7, Vista Once, VibShieldL5, but no tetanus.
 

LoveMoo11

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I've only seen bumps when sub-q technique was used. When I did mine a few months ago, I gave injectable Ivomec sub-q and most of them had bumps right after, however, a couple weeks later all the bumps were gone. You can reduce the bumps somewhat by rubbing the area well after an injection, especially of something thick. Certain vaccines cause bumps more often, like I said, thick stuff and also clostridials. Technique has something to do with it as well. But, they do happen, and that's why we have BQA guidelines! :D
 

KNERSIE

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LoveMoo11":1j1tln6y said:
I've only seen bumps when sub-q technique was used. When I did mine a few months ago, I gave injectable Ivomec sub-q and most of them had bumps right after, however, a couple weeks later all the bumps were gone. You can reduce the bumps somewhat by rubbing the area well after an injection, especially of something thick. Certain vaccines cause bumps more often, like I said, thick stuff and also clostridials. Technique has something to do with it as well. But, they do happen, and that's why we have BQA guidelines! :D

Very good answer, your hands on experience is showing.

Clostridal vaccines and pink eye vaccines seems to be the worst for leaving bumps, apart from rubbing the injection site hard to spread the fluid a little, making sure your equipment is sterilised and that you are indeed sub qutaneous before injecting, there is little more you can do. I've heard that alternating ice packs with heat packs will also reduce the reaction, but that is really only practical in the case of show animals. I've never seen Ivomec leaving bumps, but Pro-inject Yellow, an injectable dewormer and fluke remedy will leave a nasty reaction in some while it don't affect others at all.

All injection bumps will eventually go away, some may take months, though. It would still be good practice to inject your show cattle on the left side of the neck and not the right side so your body will hide the injection bumps to a degree.
 

Bez+

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I would suggest more than 70% of our injections are sub Q

If you tent the skin - in my opinion you are looking for trouble - try the downward stab parallel to the skin - neck area only - it works and I have detailed it here many, many times. Safer, more efficient and possibly why we do not have troubles others do - not for sure mind you - but possible

Never had a bump yet

Bez+
 

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