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when is the optimum time to graze grass?

rustyb

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ye i was just asking when the best time to graze grass, like at what stage. its starting to produce some seed now, and is quite green, is it a gud time ?

its called love grass, it is being grazed by a lactating jersey cow with a calf at foot

so ye post your thoughts and sugestions, also for anyone else who would know bout milking cows, well this jersey is a retired dairy cow, and now adopts calves we buy, when should she be dried off, rested and put into calf ?

thanks
 

msscamp

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rustyb":2yv8am3v said:
ye i was just asking when the best time to graze grass, like at what stage. its starting to produce some seed now, and is quite green, is it a gud time ?

You can graze it, but it is not an optimum time. Optimum time is when the grass is young, and growing. Once grass has started going to seed it is no longer in the active growing phase, and it loses protien and nutrients - the more seed it is producing, the more nutrients are lost. When it is in full seed, it usually becomes rank and the animals don't like to eat it. That undoubtedly varies from grass to grass, so I cannot say whether your cow will be reluctant to eat your type of grass, or how much protein/nutrients it has lost because it is going to seed.

its called love grass, it is being grazed by a lactating jersey cow with a calf at foot

I would monitor her condition, and supplement if necessary. Jersey's tend to produce a large quantity of milk, and she may need a higher quality of feed to do that.

so ye post your thoughts and sugestions, also for anyone else who would know bout milking cows, well this jersey is a retired dairy cow, and now adopts calves we buy, when should she be dried off, rested and put into calf ?

thanks

I have no experience with dairy breeds, so I'm not even going to attempt to answer this question.
 

Aaron

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Question #1: When you can grab the grass from ground level and if fills your clenched fist (with a few blades sticking out of your fist), it has hit a point of being able to sustain itself and can be grazed.

Question #2: Dairy cows can carry their lactation for a long time. Our old Holstein "Renee" was the last of our dairy and developed reproductive tract problems at about 8 years of age. At that point, she would only conceive once every 2-3 years. In the meantime, she would raise her own calf, then adopt and raise 2 more...all while providing the house with milk. We based her dry up time on when she bred. Being that she would go 2-3 years between lactations, we would give her a good 4 dry months before she calved and we started at her again. We sold her at 16 years of age when her milk production started to drop sharply due to lack of teeth. :cowboy:
 

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