What's up with Mickey D's?

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cypressfarms

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They're trying to catch some of that market back from Burger King. B.K. has marketed their Angus burgers hard, and you know Mc D's won't let them get the upperhand. Sounds great to me, I say it probably benefits us all.
 

farmwriter

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I don't know, but I'm out on the Mickeyd's period. A few years ago it got out they were serving Argentine beef, and no offense to Argentina or anything but I like my food from the red, white, and blue. Corporation claimed US couldn't meet their demand. Sounded like BS to me. I only go there if I've got somebody's kid with me who wants the moldy goldy arches.
 

CPL

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farmwriter":1f682ryo said:
I don't know, but I'm out on the Mickeyd's period. A few years ago it got out they were serving Argentine beef, and no offense to Argentina or anything but I like my food from the red, white, and blue. Corporation claimed US couldn't meet their demand. Sounded like BS to me. I only go there if I've got somebody's kid with me who wants the moldy goldy arches.

I thought that was fake ???
 
A

Anonymous

I have heard that yes, there is a new Angus burger about to hit the retail chain, but it's yet to be announced formally. That would be why you can't find info on it yet I'd say.
 

cmf1

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I was coming back from buying a couple of heifers in East Texas last Monday when my wife and daughter started the "I'm hungries". Crossed the La. line and stumbled on Mcd's. Ordered a "angus" burger from the menu board and they said they didn't get their truck today, I'd have to order something else.
The only time I eat at Mcd's is when somebody's "starving" and I just have to, so it didn't bother me cause it all tastes like it comes out of the same glop machine in the back anyway.
But it got me to thinking... "they actually make a distinction between their frozen patties". "I wonder what they inject into those patties to make them taste all "angusy" instead of "gloppy".

I guess I'll never know cause they were out of'em and I don't see another opportunity in the near future.
 

Frankie

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Killala":zkumwf55 said:
I have heard that yes, there is a new Angus burger about to hit the retail chain, but it's yet to be announced formally. That would be why you can't find info on it yet I'd say.

McDonald’s Corp. will introduce the first new line of hamburgers since 2001 across the U.S. starting tomorrow to broaden its menu beyond the value meals and $1 fries that have attracted customers in the recession.

The three new Angus burgers are one-third of a pound each and priced at about $4, Dan Coudreaut, executive chef for the Oak Brook, Illinois-based company, said in a telephone interview. The burgers will be available nationwide for several months, said Marta Fearon, director of marketing.

McDonald’s more expensive burgers will have to overcome the slowdown in U.S. consumer spending as people eat at home more often, said Tom Forte, an analyst with Telsey Advisory Group in New York. Meals that combine sandwiches, fries and a drink, as well as $1 menu items, have helped drive McDonald’s monthly sales growth.

“Given the recession, it’s harder to sell a premium item,” said Forte, who has a $67 to $69 price target on the stock. “It’s important that they have a menu that offers both premium and value.”

McDonald’s, the world’s largest restaurant company, rose 73 cents to $58.22 at 4 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading. The shares have lost 6.4 percent this year.

California Burgers

The company began developing the Angus burger about two years ago after franchisees in Southern California asked for a premium offering to compete with regional burger chains, Coudreaut said. The company has been adding chicken sandwiches as poultry gained popularity with diners, as well as less expensive items such as the McDouble.

The franchisees “thought there was a gap at the top end of the menu,” Coudreaut said in the June 26 interview. “We realized we needed to consider this as a category.”

The burgers may pull sales away from McDonald’s core menu of Big Macs and Quarter Pounders, said Darren Tristano, an executive vice president at Technomic Inc., a Chicago-based restaurant consulting firm.

“The Angus is going to upsell someone who would have bought a Big Mac or Quarter Pounder,” Tristano said. “It’s less likely to attract new customers than cannibalize existing ones.”

The new burgers are made with beef from Angus cows, compared with the U.S. Department of Agriculture certified beef used in Big Macs and Quarter Pounders. Those sandwiches cost about $3 each, although prices vary by region.

The new offerings didn’t hurt core menu sales during two years of tests at 500 restaurants in Los Angeles, New York, Columbus, Ohio, and Albuquerque, New Mexico, Coudreaut said. The burgers drew interest from some new and infrequent customers as well as existing patrons, Fearon said.

Competing Offerings

The new burgers feature a braided sesame seed bun, a thicker tomato slice and red onion, Coudreaut said. One of the burgers is topped with hickory-smoked bacon. The Big N’ Tasty was the last burger McDonald’s introduced, in 2001.

In California, the Angus burgers will compete with offerings from regional chains. Carl’s Jr., owned by Carpinteria-based CKE Restaurants Inc., sells the Original Six Dollar Burger, styled after the larger sandwiches made at table- service eateries. In-N-Out Burger, based in Irvine, and Fatburger Corp. in Santa Monica, also offer bigger burgers.

Burger King Holdings Inc., the second-largest burger seller in the U.S., is upgrading the broilers in its restaurants to make premium beef sandwiches later this year. Wendy’s/Arby’s Group Inc. also is testing a new signature burger.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid= ... wn4FYUZlrs
 

SRBeef

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Here is a story I heard on the radio the other day:

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=aIooVzJSdRq8

Note in the story how they refrain from saying where their other beef comes from except to say it is "U.S. Department of Agriculture certified beef used in Big Macs and Quarter Pounders".... which is code words for there was an inspector somewhere nearby when they unloaded it off of the boat....

I would not get your hopes up on this "CAB" either. I strongly doubt they will use US beef at all. Note they did not want to canibalize sales from their other burgers. I usually just stop there for a cup of coffee and to use the rest room.

Driving back from a trip out east to see my daughter and family, shortly after hearing the report on Bloomberg radio on Friday, we had to make a stop. I did find the McD's/gas station in PA where we stopped had this on the menu and I bought one. In my opinion, it was not substantially different from their other burgers (except for the price) and frankly left a very strong, long-lasting aftertaste of mustard or something....definitely not high quality beef. As I mentioned to my wife, I will never buy another one.

jmho. Jim

edit: I see Frankie just posted what I think is the same story from Bloomberg while I was looking it up. I think it is the same but not sure. The Culver's chain out of Wisconsin has much better burgers and would be my stop way ahead of a McD's.

edit#2: To check myself I looked up on Culver's website (http://www.culvers.com/about/default.aspx) and here is a quote from the nutritional page about their "butterburger":

"We use 100% U.S. beef that’s never frozen and cook it up only after you order, just the way you like it. Then it’s served up hot and fresh on a lightly buttered bun."

I think they are proof you can run a successful US restaurant/hamburger chain using US beef!
 
A

Anonymous

Well there you go... obvioulsy it has been released over your way.
It's yet to be released here - was all supposed to be hush-hush and under embargo.
 

SRBeef

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This thread got me thinking - are we being fair to McDonald's.

I went to their website, looked at a lot of pages and watch their video about Lopez Foods, a company in Oklahoma that seems like they supply all of McD's US hamburger patties.

Lopez appears to a good PROCESSING operation. The Oklahoma State Flag waves prominently at the beginning.

However the ONLY reference to the actual beef is when they show and describe "2,000lb boxes" of beef parts on pallets in the back of a truck being unloaded into the Lopez plant.

There is no mention ANYWHERE of where that beef comes from. It is claimed to be USDA inspected but I think if carcasses are imported from overseas and broken down in a US plant they can be said to be "USDA inspected".

Like I said, I want to be fair to McD's. However there is NOWHERE on their website that they come out and say where their beef is raised. The thing about there not being enough "grassfed" beef in the US to meet their needs is just hogwash. The Snopes article quotes McD's in 2002 that US feedlot beef is "not lean enough" for them.

If McDonald's said to any of the US beef associations that they wanted to buy US-source grassfed beef I suspect they would have it on their doorstep very quickly. The Snopes article says something like the imported beef was 15 cents a pound cheaper than domestic in 2002 which is evidently when the sourcing changed. I think there is the heart of the matter. Somehow it is cheaper to send beef around the world than to use US beef? Yet US customers' money is good enough for them, just not our beef?

In a quarter pounder then 1/4 of 15 cents is about 4 cents per pound. McD's seems to be using imported beef then to save 4 cents on a 1/4 pounder?

I don't understand why they can't source their beef in the country or countries where they are selling their beef. If I'm wrong I would appreciate McD's stating clearly where they (or Lopez) do source their beef for their US stores.

Jim
 

talldog

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I wonder if a chain would have a nich if they served nothing but Americas Beef ?? Wife said, most people don't give a Da** !!!!!!!! :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

1982vett

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SRBeef":22qg3p4d said:
In a quarter pounder then 1/4 of 15 cents is about 4 cents per pound. McD's seems to be using imported beef then to save 4 cents on a 1/4 pounder?Jim
It is a business decision. .04 x how many burgers they sell in a day = profit. Makeing money is the goal of any business and the fact that they can by foreign meat cheaper is purely a business decision. People don't give a rats butt as long as they can buy a cheap burger.

talldog":22qg3p4d said:
I wonder if a chain would have a nich if they served nothing but Americas Beef ?? Wife said, most people don't give a Da** !!!!!!!! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Quite true. Most people wouldn't dare "buying on the cheap" when buying shoes, clothing, cars, houses, electronics. The more they spend on those things give the illusion of wealth. These same people wouldn't dare spend the .04 cents extra to feed themselves just because it is grown in the USA.
 

SRBeef

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talldog":1bi99mdf said:
I wonder if a chain would have a nich if they served nothing but Americas Beef ?? Wife said, most people don't give a Da** !!!!!!!! :lol: :lol: :lol:

I think that is a great idea. That is what Culver's does. The "100% US-raised beef" is not so prominent in their stores but very clear on their website. The quality of their burgers is obvious when you eat them.

McD's can obviously source their beef anywhere they want. The fact they are so secretive about where it comes from makes you wonder.

I think the market that their "Southern California franchisees" is looking for would like to know where the beef they are buying comes from. However there is more to a burger than where it comes from - it needs to be a quality product. As the McD's Angus burger I bought last Friday points out, there is more to quality than a sign and promotion campaign.

If a chain offers customers a choice: quality US sourced beef and low cost no-name beef and clearly labels them as such as many supermarkets do I think you will find customers are willing to pay 4 cents more for a quality US sourced beef product.

On second thought, I think I'll just go to Culver's.
 

farmwriter

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SrBeef, you and I could have lunch together anytime. ;-)
I'm about as likely to choose McD's as Chuckie Cheese, know what I mean?
I like to know what I'm eating, and like you, think secrecy means something is worth hiding. People ought to be able to sell (almost) whatever they want, just give me the info to make the best choice for myself.
 

alacattleman

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those macnuggetts are a favorite among those 12 and under, they gonna have too build a better burger for me to endure 50 screaming kids around me
 

chippie

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MacDonald's is the US's largest user of USA Holstein beef. A feedlot near my oldest daughter feeds out Holstein steers for MacDonalds. They've been using Holstein beef for a very long time (25 + years).
 

SRBeef

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chippie":2lrkcdvr said:
MacDonald's is the US's largest user of USA Holstein beef. A feedlot near my oldest daughter feeds out Holstein steers for MacDonalds. They've been using Holstein beef for a very long time (25 + years).

That's interesting. There is no mention of that at all on their website. In fact the few picures they do show of cattle (at the intro to the Lopez processing video) definitely do not show Holsteins.The cattle shown are on tall grass with bales alongside. There are also references in several places (snopes quote above) that McD's wanted "grassfed" beef, that "cornfed US feedlot beef" was not right for them. Or something to that effect. Jim
 

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