What are good bull test results?

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TexasShooter

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I am in the process of getting a new bull over the next couple of weeks. My last bull tested out at 50/50 (and is now hamburger). I have had a lousy season from his “hit and miss” situation. My vet told me (if I heard him correctly) the first # is concentration and the second # is live sperm. He told me that the minimum is 70/70. Does this sound correct? My reasoning is that in my search for a new bull, I want to make sure he is able to do the job, etc. I need him to service approx. 25 cows on 80 acres. What should the test numbers be? Am I looking for...anything over 70/70?...80/80?...90/90? Please help. I am looking seriously at 2 bulls 4 and 5 yrs old. Is this okay to?
 

jt

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TexasShooter":347qqckr said:
I am in the process of getting a new bull over the next couple of weeks. My last bull tested out at 50/50 (and is now hamburger). I have had a lousy season from his “hit and miss” situation. My vet told me (if I heard him correctly) the first # is concentration and the second # is live sperm. He told me that the minimum is 70/70. Does this sound correct? My reasoning is that in my search for a new bull, I want to make sure he is able to do the job, etc. I need him to service approx. 25 cows on 80 acres. What should the test numbers be? Am I looking for...anything over 70/70?...80/80?...90/90? Please help. I am looking seriously at 2 bulls 4 and 5 yrs old. Is this okay to?

bulls must be considered 70% good on the mobility, shape, movement, etc of the sperm in order to pass the fertility test. he will either be scored at 70% and pass or he will be scored less and fail. this part of the fertility test is the most important one. if you ask your vet, he/she will probably let you look into the microscope and see the sperm, and may tell you what % is considered good.. but the score sheet, if that is what you want to call it, only requires .. is he above or below 70%. at least that is the way it is where i am located...


jt
 

Oldtimer

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Texasshooter- 1 bull should be able to easily handle 25 cows in that confined an area- even a yearling should be able to get the job done for you- Sometimes when in a smaller area like that one bull is better than 2 because they spend half their time fighting.

One 4 year old bull would definitely handle the problem- Although I don't know where you will find a virgin 4 year old bull. I would never use any bulls that have been used by someone else, due to the danger of the sexually transmitted diseases. We usually get rid of all bulls at age 4 ( buy as yearlings and use 3 years) because of the factor of the old bulls being more susceptible to disease.
 

TheBullLady

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Oldtimer.. funny how people perceive things differently!

We never buy virgin bulls anymore.. simply because we don't want to waste the time waiting for progeny to be born to evaluate the bull.

We've had exceptional results in the past 3 years with "older" (3-4) year old bulls that were purchased from a registered herd.. and being sold only because the owner wanted to retain excellent heifers from the bull. They are usually a good deal as well as being quiet (or they wouldn't have been around that long) and being able to see the progeny is a plus. In my opinion, of course.
 

TexasCountryWoman

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TexasShooter,
Like jt said, a bull should test at 70% to be considered a "tested bull with positive results" so to speak. Under 70% and he is condidered a dud. My new two year old tested at 84%. That means that 84% of his sperm were normal and ready for action.
 

CattleAnnie

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Just a note of interest; sometimes a bull will have a 'bad' semen test the first time around - up here cold days can make a difference in the results, and I've known of some outfits that have had a remarkable difference when semen testing after penning the bull with low test results next to a pen of cows, especially if some or all are cycling.

Take care.
 

txag

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CattleAnnie":29b9optu said:
Just a note of interest; sometimes a bull will have a 'bad' semen test the first time around - up here cold days can make a difference in the results, and I've known of some outfits that have had a remarkable difference when semen testing after penning the bull with low test results next to a pen of cows, especially if some or all are cycling.

Take care.

good point, annie. around here it's the hot days that can do it as well.
 

Michelle Pankonien

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There are a couple of different ways to semen test a bull

Electro-ejaculation with a rectal probe, or a live jump using a steer and an AV

I have had some interesting experience with vets collection Bulls so here is some advice

First the bull should have it scrotal measurment taken, at 12 monthes of age the bull should have a bare minamum of a 32 cm circumfrence, this will affect the age of maturity of his daughters,

Second the secondary accessory sex glands should be palpated rectaly by someone that does this regularly

Third, before collection the bulls penis should be examined, for defects, such as scaring, hair ring, damage from breeding a female through the fence ect.

All these things can affect a bulls performance and pregnancy success

the bull should also be able to have and maintane a full errection in order to breed the cow

Next the Bull should be collected to evaluate VOLUME, CONCENTRATION, using as mass spectrometer, which will show the conc. of sperm in the ejaculate

Then a know conc. of semen needs to be diluted to look at
Motility: ativity of sperm (Blizard affect)

, Morphology (concentration of normal well formed V mal formed sperm)

, and Morbidity (dead V Live cells)

Pressence of WBC (white blood cells) skin cells, bacteria

Will indicate infection, other tests include STD's, the prime reason for buying and using VIRGIN bulls, is to prevent the spread of STD's to other cow herds which can leave you with a 0 % calf crop, late calvers etc.

Don't buy a bull that is older and has been used, unless he has been tested at a bull stud, rested for 60 days and has a clean bill of health for all Bovine STD's, Jones, Leucocsis, Bangs, TB etc.

It is the equivalent of shooting yourself in the foot

Why would you do that?
 
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