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warts

A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi!

I am hoping that you can help our farm. We have been treating our cattle with vaccines to help with the control of our wart breakout in our cattle feedlot herd. However, that is a lot of cattle to repeatedly give shots to.

We were wondering if there is any type of chemicals that we can use to clean and disinfect the barns with that would also help get rid of this problem. It only seems to be getting worse these last few years, and needless to say we are not sure what else we can do.

Please let me know if you have any advice, as it would greatly be appreciated.

Thanks for your time.



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A

Anonymous

Guest
Warts are viral, the vaccine is only mildly effective,

From what I understand and can guess from your type of herd environment, you are, or whomever gives the shots are the major cause of the spread of the warts. When you injuect a helthy animal with a needle that has previously entered an infected animal, you are in essence innoculating the healthy animal with the wart virus. I would stop using the vaccine, and start using disposable needles, and also, if you use ear implant which many feedlots do, the ear implant needle is also a source of the warts being transmitted, warts are not harmful, they are unsitely, but they go away, and if you are feeding out cattle for slaughter, what does it matter,

you could always get some flat head dikes, cut a few warts off and feed them to the infected animal, that is the fastest way to get them all to drop off.

Good luck

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A

Anonymous

Guest
> Hi!

> I am hoping that you can help our
> farm. We have been treating our
> cattle with vaccines to help with
> the control of our wart breakout
> in our cattle feedlot herd.
> However, that is a lot of cattle
> to repeatedly give shots to.

> We were wondering if there is any
> type of chemicals that we can use
> to clean and disinfect the barns
> with that would also help get rid
> of this problem. It only seems to
> be getting worse these last few
> years, and needless to say we are
> not sure what else we can do.

> Please let me know if you have any
> advice, as it would greatly be
> appreciated.

> Thanks for your time. Hi,

I noticed a walnut sized, flesh colored bumpy growth on my scottish highland hefier's neck last pm. does this sound like a wart?



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A

Anonymous

Guest
No, it sounds like an injection site blemish. Was this animal vaccinated recently? if so I would say it is a IM injection that had a reaction or a sub-Q injection that ended up sub dermal, in the hide and turned into a lump. If it is not any of these things it could have been a bite from a large horse fly, these will often welp up for a while then go away.



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A

Anonymous

Guest
I have had wart problems in the past.They are ugly and annoying.I frequently work cattle through a head chute and I noticed warts on the necks of cattle.I began disinfecting the head gate with alcohol and the problem stopped.Also I dip my needles in alcohol between each calf also I pour alcohol on and in the balling gun between each calf.Also you need to clean feed bunkers with water and bleach and also keep water tanks cleaned out with water and bleach as well.All of this may seem a little excessive but warts and other diseases are spread in each of these cases.You can buy a big bottle of alcohol for 39 cents keep it with your other tools to work cattle.



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A

Anonymous

Guest
Alcohol is a good disinfectant, but it does not kill every thing, and the stuff it does not get are the really bad bugs that are not affected by alcohol.

Also, Alcohol, used to disifect needles inbetween cattle is prabably making the vaccine/antibiotic useless, unless it is stated on the vaccine that this is a recommended technique for sterilization, most in fact, say DO NOT use alcohol, as it will inactivate the vaccine, even if you are sterilizing the multi dose equipment at home and drying completly, the residue will still affect the efficacy of the vaccine, boiling for several minutes in sterile water is recommended for multi use dose equipment, with a drying time sufficient to remove all H2O from the needles and dose guns and tubing.

It is far safer to use a disposable needle and disposable syringes, the syringes can be used several times, if you check to make sure no back flash of blood has occured into the tip, if it has you will see a blood tinged fluid near the hub of the needle, change syringes, but change needls every animal, common sence, do you want to get shots with needles that have been previously used in another patient? NO, so why do it with your cows? It does not cost that much more, and preventing the spread of a transmitable disease to even one animal would cover that cost several times over. I stand by what my previous post was for the prevention of Warts, it is right on the money!

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