Warts

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Anonymous

One of my mama cows has a wart developing on the tip of her ear. It is about the size of a dime, and is starting to get thick (at least a quarter inch) I read that warts come as a result of fly tagging, and usually disappear after a few months, but #14 developed this wart well after the tags were put in, and I really have no idea of how long she has had it. I do know that the thickness has changed since I noticed it a while back. What do I do about it? As far as I know it is the only one on her, and I don't see evidence of it in the other animals.

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OP
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Anonymous

> One of my mama cows has a wart
> developing on the tip of her ear.
> It is about the size of a dime,
> and is starting to get thick (at
> least a quarter inch) I read that
> warts come as a result of fly
> tagging, and usually disappear
> after a few months, but #14
> developed this wart well after the
> tags were put in, and I really
> have no idea of how long she has
> had it. I do know that the
> thickness has changed since I
> noticed it a while back. What do I
> do about it? As far as I know it
> is the only one on her, and I
> don't see evidence of it in the
> other animals. warts usually go away on their own, but there is a vaccine for this condition. we purchased an angus bull with warts that went away on thier own. so be patient and hopeful. remember to vaccinate annually, there after.



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OP
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Anonymous

> So, if I vaccinate for the warts,
> then I must continue to vaccinate
> that cow annually? Will be
> patient.... sounds more practical.

Warts are caused by a virus. Sooner or later, the cow's immune system realizes the wart is there and mounts an attack on the virus and the wart goes away.

Just as in humans, you can do something to irritate the wart and the body will usually recognize the presence of the wart sooner and get rid of it. Some people pinch the wart with pliers; some cut it off, etc. Depends on where the wart is and how badly you want it to go away.

In humans, a wart is often shaved off and a mild acid applied to the site. The shaving and acid will not get rid of the wart, but they are irritating and send a signal to the body's immune system. Sometimes physicians use an application of liquid nitrogen to freeze the wart, with the same irritating result.

I haven't used the wart vaccine and am not familiar with it, so cannot answer that question for you.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Wart vaccine can be administered for a one-time incidence. But, the vaccine is for a specific virus, so it does not always help. The only time I use the vaccine, is it is a required shot for the bulls going on test. We show cattle and they cannot be shown with warts, so we cut them off, but they will go away on their own. Jeanne <A HREF="http://www.SimmeValley.com" TARGET="_blank">http://www.SimmeValley.com</A>

> Warts are caused by a virus.
> Sooner or later, the cow's immune
> system realizes the wart is there
> and mounts an attack on the virus
> and the wart goes away.

> Just as in humans, you can do
> something to irritate the wart and
> the body will usually recognize
> the presence of the wart sooner
> and get rid of it. Some people
> pinch the wart with pliers; some
> cut it off, etc. Depends on where
> the wart is and how badly you want
> it to go away.

> In humans, a wart is often shaved
> off and a mild acid applied to the
> site. The shaving and acid will
> not get rid of the wart, but they
> are irritating and send a signal
> to the body's immune system.
> Sometimes physicians use an
> application of liquid nitrogen to
> freeze the wart, with the same
> irritating result.

> I haven't used the wart vaccine
> and am not familiar with it, so
> cannot answer that question for
> you.

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