Quit Calving?

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Anonymous

At what age does a cow usually quit having calves? I've got 2 cows that are 10 yrs.old and I've got 7 calves apiece off them. My husband thinks I should get rid of them because they're so old. The cows are Hereford/Angus cross.

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Anonymous

If the old girls feet, legs and udder are still sound, they haven't started loosing teeth and can still maintane theor body condition while feeding a good calf, breed back on time and carry the calf, why get rid of them? Ours get a physical each spring post calving, checking there teeth primarily. If they are solid, the next time they are looked at for culling is at prg check time. If they're open the leave, if not they stick around for another year. I value those old cows, they are the money makers, lower feed requirements, reliable at calving, settle easily, and obviously they're pretty good cows or they wouldn't have stuck around this long.

dunmovin farms

> At what age does a cow usually
> quit having calves? I've got 2
> cows that are 10 yrs.old and I've
> got 7 calves apiece off them. My
> husband thinks I should get rid of
> them because they're so old. The
> cows are Hereford/Angus cross.
 
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A

Anonymous

I agree with Dun. There are several examples of cattle breeding successfully into their twenties. One old Simmental cow entered a flush program when she was about 18 or 19--and was successfully flushed several times! I was called out to a farm a few years back to see a cow who was "choking" with feed stuck in her esophagus. She was a 28 year old Hereford with few/no teeth left. The farmer didn't want to cull her because she was pregnant. So as long as her udder, feet and teeth are holding up, her age shouldn't be the only deciding factor in culling, unless you're pressed for space and have some good heifers coming up!
 
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Anonymous

We finally shipped an 18 year old Simmental cow, that had 17 natural calves (12 heifers!) because she quit cycling. Always calved during first 30 days of calving season. We have lots of daughters, granddaughters -- to great-great granddaughters. If they're good, they're hard to replace. Jeanne <A HREF="http://www.SimmeValley.com" TARGET="_blank">http://www.SimmeValley.com</A>
> I agree with Dun. There are
> several examples of cattle
> breeding successfully into their
> twenties. One old Simmental cow
> entered a flush program when she
> was about 18 or 19--and was
> successfully flushed several
> times! I was called out to a farm
> a few years back to see a cow who
> was "choking" with feed
> stuck in her esophagus. She was a
> 28 year old Hereford with few/no
> teeth left. The farmer didn't want
> to cull her because she was
> pregnant. So as long as her udder,
> feet and teeth are holding up, her
> age shouldn't be the only deciding
> factor in culling, unless you're
> pressed for space and have some
> good heifers coming up!

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Anonymous

Thanks guys for the info. My husband doesn't know it but these 2 old girls will die here. I've got a small herd of 30 and they're the foundation to the whole herd. Started out with just these 2 and 1 Holstein/Angus cross. I put a bull in for 2 mos. and they haven't missed yet. Other than the Holstein cross who misses every other year. But, she goes way down after she calves even with weaning her calves at 4 mos.

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