If you buying from a seedstock man......

Help Support CattleToday:

blackcowz

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
487
Reaction score
0
Location
Eastern Plains of Colorado
If you were buying from a seedstock man, what things would you be looking for in him and his operation? I of course want to produce reliable, proven genetics that people want to buy. I would also want to run a "transparent" operation that was a 100% honest with nothing to hide. I think those are some important things. Now, lets get into breeds. I want to produce registered Angus seedstock to sell to commercial and Angus cattlemen. However, I have considered the fact of running two breeds. I.e., like the Express Ranch selling Angus and Limousine seedstock while also selling LimFlex crossbreds. What are your thoughts on that? If I am raising Angus, should I stick with that one breed? Or, if I do run another breed and also sell F1's, should I keep to the British breeds or get the vigor of a Continental? I don't know how stupid this sounds, but I would dumber yet if I didn't ask it. 'Preciate you taking the time to help me out.
 

cypressfarms

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 5, 2005
Messages
3,473
Reaction score
27
Location
New Roads, LA
As a commercial cattleman, I don't really have any use for registered cows - they only cost more, on average, and don't produce the pounds that a cross would. I do buy registered bulls, however, mostly for calf uniformity and predictable traits (epd's etc.).

There is a local brangus breeder that runs a really nice operation. He raises registered stock, but behind the scenes he has more than 1,000 head of cows (brangus) that he crosses with hereford bulls. He sells the resulting steers for butcher or at the stockyards or by the truckload. The heifers (baldies) he sells as replacements. Since he runs a fairly big operation, he has sales each year. He packages the heifers into groups of 5 and does really well. He's developed a really good reputation (I've bought 2 bulls and several cow/calf pairs from him) and works hard for the profit he makes. He also breeds Brangus to Angus to make Angus plus's and markets them as well. The added advantage of this cross is that the offspring can be registered with the Red Angus Association and he can sell the male calves that are good as bulls. The heifer Angus plus's are sold as replacements similar to the baldies.

Just some thoughts.
 

Running Arrow Bill

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2003
Messages
3,439
Reaction score
2
Location
Texas Panhandle On US 83
I'll avoid talking about any specific breed here.

The things a reputable seedstock producer should have include (but are not limited to):

  • 1. A well cared for infrastructure that is not overrun with junk.
    2. A written (or computerized) record of all vaccinations, de-worming that you can get a copy of.
    3. A record of all matings so you know who the sire and dam are.
    4. BW, WW record.
    5. Obviously: Cattle that look good, in good health, and not in a dirty crowded environment.
 
OP
blackcowz

blackcowz

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
487
Reaction score
0
Location
Eastern Plains of Colorado
Running Arrow Bill":3shbxc6s said:
I'll avoid talking about any specific breed here.

The things a reputable seedstock producer should have include (but are not limited to):

  • 1. A well cared for infrastructure that is not overrun with junk.
    2. A written (or computerized) record of all vaccinations, de-worming that you can get a copy of.
    3. A record of all matings so you know who the sire and dam are.
    4. BW, WW record.
    5. Obviously: Cattle that look good, in good health, and not in a dirty crowded environment.
Thanks. I'll keep this list on hand for sure.
 

Herefords.US

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2006
Messages
2,066
Reaction score
4
Location
North Central Texas
I'll probably catch flack for saying this, but, as a seedstock breeder, if your operation is less than 75-100 mother cows, I think you should concentrate on one breed. Try to be a "jack of all trades", and you'll be the master of none!

George
 

Aaron

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 26, 2005
Messages
5,221
Reaction score
15
Location
Stratton, ON, Canada
Have the character to maintain your handshake as your word, and to go the extra mile if your buyer encounters any problems. I do and I expect all seedstock buyers I buy from to do as well. Or I might come back next time with a saw in my other hand. :cowboy: ;-)
 

mnmtranching

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
5,061
Reaction score
0
Location
MN
I want him concentrating on one breed, no F1's. That's the commercial guys job.
Have the best looking cow herd around, good udders, disposition, easy keepers,
Raise the bulls on high roughage, add protein and energy to ensure good growth.
Yearling bulls should be big and stout. Ready to breed cows at 14-15 months.
AI with the best bulls. And herd bulls all top quality.
Birth weights low weaning weights high.
Customers should be able to walk among the cow herd and bulls and see nothing but quality content animals.
Be able to show off the mother cow to the prospective buyer.
Maternal is very important, most of us will raise our replacements.
Go with a popular market topping breed. And popular in your region.
Have some steers/heifers on feed to show the product.
All this and you will have a step or two on your competitors.
I would buy bulls from this type seedstock man. And there are some around.
 
OP
blackcowz

blackcowz

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
487
Reaction score
0
Location
Eastern Plains of Colorado
Wow, thanks to all of you for your replies. I think that sticking to raising good Angus would probably be the place to start instead of being a "rainbow" seedstock producer. Also, the advice on this board has helped me to concentrate on what I am selling and why. Once again, I appreciate it, and I'll be sure to keep you all updated on my progress.
 

Frankie

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2003
Messages
6,915
Reaction score
0
Location
Oklahoma
blackcowz":2yo9xc9b said:
Wow, thanks to all of you for your replies. I think that sticking to raising good Angus would probably be the place to start instead of being a "rainbow" seedstock producer. Also, the advice on this board has helped me to concentrate on what I am selling and why. Once again, I appreciate it, and I'll be sure to keep you all updated on my progress.

IMO, the key is to provide whatever information your customer wants. If he wants to see the momma, show him. If he wants EPDs, actual BW, WW, ADG, ultrasound data, have them available. Use the AAA's suggested terms and conditions of sale....or do better than they suggest. And, very important in my mind, is to have a price and be ready to justify that price if he counteroffers. If you're putting an ad in the paper, put the price in the ad. It will cut down on the phone calls from bargain hunters.
 

Latest posts

Top