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hurleyjd

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If you watch the news there is a shortage of qualified people that the employers need. This brings me to a article several years ago where there was money set aside to train people for positions. Two short order cooks were selected to be trained in a six week course in operating machine shop type machines. Concentration was on the machines and how to operate them and nothing else. Both learned and moved into good paying jobs. Now who provides the training money I think it should be the owners of the business that needs the employees. We all need to invest in the future with education and training. Heb the grocery chain in Texas has courses they support so a person can get out of high school and be a certified food handler. Also Caterpillar has a course they support in Sequin Texas. This course trains someone in Diesel mechanics and one on welding. A high school graduate will be certified and ready for the work force right out of high school.
 

Bright Raven

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I agree that whoever benefits should pay. Most of Corporate America does.

That does not mean government should not play some role.
 
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hurleyjd

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Government is the only thing that keeps us a civil society. And why does it benefit any one to not understand that people has to be trained
 

Bright Raven

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M-5":2hl92a03 said:
Bright Raven":2hl92a03 said:
I agree that whoever benefits should pay. Most of Corporate America does.

That does not mean government should not play some role.

The only role they should play it to get the HEII out of the way.

You are emphatic! So you want to end the extension and conservation services and facilitated training most ag states have set up through Soil Conservation Services or the University Systems? I disagree. Cattle Associations at both local, state and national level make an effort to promote those programs.
 

M-5

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read the constitution and the role. The private sector has the responsibility to hire and train . the .Gov should not have ever been the largest employer in this country aside from military. The only reason we have been successful as a country is from capitalism and hard working individuals with a vision,
 

True Grit Farms

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Some folks just need someone follow. Once the Swamp is drained water will be at a premium. A third of the population are raised on handouts and don't know how to be responsible. And having a job is a responsibility.
The military pays you to train and does a mighty fine job of it.
 

Rafter S

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Normally I'm in favor of keeping the government limited to the bare minimum, but if job training will get people off welfare we all benefit, and I don't have a problem with using government funds for it. Again, that's if it gets them off welfare.
 

greybeard

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TG, lots of industry down here has OtJT and internships, where prospective full time employees get trained and paid while getting trained. I know Exxon does it, canvassing high school seniors for people that want to work in the Baytown refineries, tho I think nowadays, they look more at people with 2 years of community college. I went from a diesel mechanic to machinist by taking a job at a machine shop in the 90s when the oilfield went kapuut. I'd never seen a CNC the day I talked my way into that job, but was honest and up front about that fact.

Like you said tho, the prospective employee has to be willing to do the training and learn. Convince the employer you can and want to, and you're 1/2 way there.
Too many want to just walk right in and be making the big $ without having the training or getting some experience under their belts.
 

greybeard

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callmefence":370veupd said:
I disagree with all of you. There's no shortage of skills or ability. There's a shortage of desire to use them.
Agree, or at least there are potential skills all over the place.
(If I were 20 years younger I would jump on Fence Solutions recent offer--I LIKE building fence, but just too old and decrepit to do much of it anymore)

For "somebody".....
https://houston.craigslist.org/grd/6150903958.html

https://austin.craigslist.org/grd/6141464186.html
 

Caustic Burno

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callmefence":30be0k1v said:
I disagree with all of you. There's no shortage of skills or ability. There's a shortage of desire to use them.

No there is a major shortage of the trades as the boomers retired out 2006 to 2016. It was like 400,000 on the Gulf Coast when I retired in 07. I was part of the team that set up the apprentice programs for pipe, machinists and electrical.
We started them out at 25 an hour three days in the refinery two days class a week.
The major problem was finding trainees that could read write and arithmetic.
Then there was the drug test.
Out of 2000 applicators for 40 electrical jobs 60 passed the drug and
comprehensive test.
 

Bright Raven

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Ol' 243":1cg6w65x said:
Government getting involved in training folks to work, will just turn into another form of welfare.

They ARE ALREADY involved. You can peruse the US Dept of Labor website and get an idea of the scope, but it is huge. There are also programs in the US Dept of Education.

Those are the big hitters. US Dept of Agriculture also has programs for farmers. I would guess almost every cabinet Dept has a training budget.
 

Draper

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There's definitely a shortage of skill-- you can want to frame a house all you want but without any training, you're not going to get much done. Modern k-12 education prepares students for private sector employment in service and technology.. Unfortunately, those that lack the capacity to excel in those industries really struggle as they have never had any exposure or training to anything else. K-12 needs to accept that everyone is not "college material" and bring back the trades: plumbing, electrical, carpentry, auto mechanics, auto body, etc. I know several millennials in these trades and they are ALL doing exceptionally well-- but the kicker is that the only millennials I know that fall into this category are ones that had the luxury of growing up in the family business and thus got the exposure/training necessary to make a career out of it. Another prohibiting factor is inflation: look at any purchasing power calculator. In the baby boomer's heyday, young men could support a household on apprentice/journeymen wages.. Today, fulfilling this same role you'd be hard pressed to afford a 1 bedroom apt. Compensation at the top has skyrocketed. In the early 70s, CEO compensation was around 30 times that of avg employee. Today, that number is 300 times. The fat cats have become accustomed to discounted labor costs via immigrants... Wages will have to increase in order for trade jobs to ever have the appeal they once had-- Paying skilled framers/plumbers $14/hr isn't going to cut it
 

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