Cutting Calves

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Anonymous

Where could I find a catalog that sells Burdizzos? I checked Valley Vet and they don't seem to carry them.

Also, we clamped a 6 month old Longhorn bull this weekend using some borrowed Burdizzos, and could only find 1 testicle. For you people that are cutting quite a few calves, is this a common occurrence? I figured they would both be descended by 6 months?? On this particular calf, we just clamped the one side because that's what the owner wanted to do.
 
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Anonymous

Might also try Country Supply, American Vet Supply, or NASCO.

Would think at 6 months both testicles should definitely have dropped. See your vet. Maybe a palpation could locate other one. Only one would be considered a defect in any animal obviously.

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Anonymous

i've cut calves as young as a week old, more than likely the nut is there you might have to work it out with your fingers, don't dig around to much or he'll bleed a lot.
 
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Anonymous

I'm totally ignorant on this, but I read in one of Joel Salatin's books that at 90 days, he cuts off the bottom 1/3 of the sack, then pulls out both seeds by hand as a removal method and doesn't cut. He claims there is far less blood lost and it works quite well. Does this work? Again, I admit my total ignorance. jim

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Anonymous

Some folks still cut but most either chafe the cords through with a knife or pull them. Either way there is normally less bleeding. A local vet uses an electric drill with a fork looking thing on it to pull them. She does it that way no matter how old they are.

dun

> I'm totally ignorant on this, but
> I read in one of Joel Salatin's
> books that at 90 days, he cuts off
> the bottom 1/3 of the sack, then
> pulls out both seeds by hand as a
> removal method and doesn't cut. He
> claims there is far less blood
> lost and it works quite well. Does
> this work? Again, I admit my total
> ignorance. jim
 
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Anonymous

> Some folks still cut but most
> either chafe the cords through
> with a knife or pull them. Either
> way there is normally less
> bleeding. A local vet uses an
> electric drill with a fork looking
> thing on it to pull them. She does
> it that way no matter how old they
> are.

> dun "an electric drill with a fork" ... that made me double up in my chair at the thought of that
 
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Anonymous

Our vet uses the drill thing also...when she first used it, I asked her if the Makita people knew what she was doing with their product! (Might give them a new slant to their marketing.) But it certainly seemed to work well (?) as the boys are now mooing a couple of octaves higher than before.

> Some folks still cut but most
> either chafe the cords through
> with a knife or pull them. Either
> way there is normally less
> bleeding. A local vet uses an
> electric drill with a fork looking
> thing on it to pull them. She does
> it that way no matter how old they
> are.

> dun



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Anonymous

I agree. Any Vet that would use such a technique should be forever barred from "practicing" his or her trade. From a lot of accounts and research, animals DO have emotions and can feel pain...right? When did such butchers lose sight of the word ANESTHETIC! Perhaps a more appropriate use for the "drill" butcher would be to insert the drill where it would do the most good...let's call it a "Mechanical Enema." Enough said....

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