Anyone have an all-steel frame building for machine storage?

Help Support CattleToday:

John SD

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 9, 2010
Messages
1,584
Reaction score
0
Location
Meade County, South Dakota USA
I'm intrigued by the buildings in the ad for this place in a little shopper paper, so I looked up the website. Might pay them a visit to see just what they have available. http://www.aaasheds.net/steel-buildings

A steel frame structure could serve my purposes now, and could easily be sold and moved later on when one day I no longer have a use for it.

I'm thinking machine shed storage with a 12x12 overhead door in each end big enough to park a 100HP cab tractor inside each door, with my Vermeer between the tractors :idea: Maybe a walk door in each end. One tractor has a 9' wide dozer, and both tractors will have either a snowblower or bale unroller on.

I'll have to measure the tractors with implements and the rake to see how long the building would have to be :oops:
 

10-e-c-dirtfarmer

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 7, 2007
Messages
95
Reaction score
9
Location
East Tn
Get a Bigger Door! My overhead door is 16 X 12, At times, I wish it was 14 high! 16 wide is about right for my operation, although some would need a much wider door.
 

Nesikep

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Messages
16,675
Reaction score
1,183
Location
Lillooet, BC, Canada
We have a 12x12 door on our shop, it does for what we need, but we don't have any semis to work on either. We used a 30x100' greenhouse for storage for a long time until the wind blew the plastic off it. Covered space is always good, go as big as you can with it, you'll find stuff to fill it with!
 

wbvs58

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 20, 2011
Messages
5,887
Reaction score
1,023
Location
S.E. Queensland, Australia
Yeh, that's all we have in Australia. 99% of sheds would be 100% steel construction. They are strong, easy and fast to erect and can be rated to the highest cyclone rating mainly by adding extra bracing. My main machinery shed has 4 metre wide bays (about 13'4" in your lingo). The uprights and main portal frame are of rolled galvenised C section (200x75) I think and then they are squared up and linked together with rolled tophat battens and the same tophats are used for girts along the side. The sky is the limit as far as size goes. They can have roller doors or left open or half and half. Their construction is very flexible with what you do with them and they last forever. Over here they are certainly a lot cheaper to build than anything with timber. They can be built on a concrete slab or straight onto the ground by digging piers and can follow the slope of ground very easily if need be.
Ken
 

muleskinner

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
117
Reaction score
0
Location
WV
They work fine for buildings. Only thing is to make sure SNOW LOAD and wind load is adaquate for your area.
 

MudHog

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2013
Messages
509
Reaction score
1
Location
New Iberia, LA
All steel buildings are the most popular here, but wood frame post sheds are making a come back. Depending on what you want your freespan to be, you may need to go to an engineered truss style shed to keep the floor open.

Down here in South LA, 25ft is the widest span an 8" perlin can span post to post. I would suspect much shorter with snow load up North. Any wider and your looking at engineered trusses or the manufactured steel beam.


Check out www.idealsteel.com which is a local company. They have a lot of pictures to look at.
 
Top