Angus Certification Requirements Revised

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Bright Raven

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Muddy, there are two criteria in the Live Animal Marketing Specifications: one is Genotype the other is Phenotype. The Phenotype is being changed to limit the scope of white color.

However, if the genotype demonstrates the Angus influence it is my understanding that it trumps the limitations on color. This would be highly unlikely but here are the actual suggested policy changes in draft form showing the revisions that will go into effect on July 1.

LIVE ANIMAL SPECIFICATION
AMERICAN ANGUS ASSOCIATION’S
SPECIFICATION FOR CHARACTERISITCS OF CATTLE ELIGIBLE FOR
APPROVED BEEF PROGRAMS CLAIMING ANGUS INFLUENCE

2.1 Genotype. Cattle eligible for Angus influence beef programs based on genotype must have positive identification (ear tags, tattoos, brands, etc.) and be traceable back to provable (e.g., registration papers) Angus parentage. Qualifying cattle must be traceable to one registered parent or two registered grandparents. Programs which claim a specified percentage of Angus
heritage must use this method.

2.2 Phenotype. Cattle eligible for certification in Angus influence beef programs based on
phenotype (appearance) will have a main body that must be solid black, must be predominately (51 percent) solid black with no other color behind the shoulder, above the flanks, or breaking the midline behind the shoulders, excluding the tail. Blue roan, gray, etc., are not considered to
be black or a percentage of black. Such variations can qualify only when it occupies 49 percent, or less, of the body area with the remaining 51 percent, or greater, being solid black. Angus influence cattle may be either horned or polled. Carcasses of certified live animals which display certain non-Angus characteristics (e.g., dairy conformation, Holsteins, Brahman humps)
will be excluded as specified in the carcass specifications for approved programs.
 

Bright Raven

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Jeanne - Simme Valley":1c72a93o said:
BR - I would guess you are correct on that interpretation.

I think it would be almost impossible to find a pedigreed genotype that had enough white to fail the phenotype criteria.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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Well, they are talking two grandparents. So, you could breed a reg Ang with a fullblood type Simm, the offspring would be solid, but if bred to another 1/2 blood, they could produce spots if both 1/2 blood parents inherited the spotting gene & both passed it to the offspring. Rare, but could happen.
 

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