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Young Angus bulls

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Ky hills

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These are some home raised AI sired yearling Angus bulls, that I have had out with heifers for a few weeks.
Stevenson Rockmount x Sydgen CC&7




PA Power Tool x HA Image Maker




A crossbred Rockmount son out of a Beefmaster cow, that we are using on a very small number of cows.
 
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Ky hills

Ky hills

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True Grit Farms":3410osl7 said:
What kind of cows are you using the crossbred bull on, and why?

Just a small number of cows, Angus, and BWF, I like a little bit of Brahman influence. The cows that I have that have a small amount of ear breeding in them, seem to milk well, and raise good sized calves. I have thought about AI'ing some to Brangus or Beefmaster, but have just been using bulls the last 2 years.
 

Brute 23

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Ky hills":2asu74m8 said:
True Grit Farms":2asu74m8 said:
What kind of cows are you using the crossbred bull on, and why?

Just a small number of cows, Angus, and BWF, I like a little bit of Brahman influence. The cows that I have that have a small amount of ear breeding in them, seem to milk well, and raise good sized calves. I have thought about AI'ing some to Brangus or Beefmaster, but have just been using bulls the last 2 years.

:shock: You just just broke two of the CT cardinal rules... using cattle with ear in the north and a crossbred bull. You are officially blacklisted. Prepare for the 100 Question War with the Angus Mafia. :hide:
 
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Ky hills

Ky hills

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Brute 23":1unggufv said:
Ky hills":1unggufv said:
True Grit Farms":1unggufv said:
What kind of cows are you using the crossbred bull on, and why?

Just a small number of cows, Angus, and BWF, I like a little bit of Brahman influence. The cows that I have that have a small amount of ear breeding in them, seem to milk well, and raise good sized calves. I have thought about AI'ing some to Brangus or Beefmaster, but have just been using bulls the last 2 years.

:shock: You just just broke two of the CT cardinal rules... using cattle with ear in the north and a crossbred bull. You are officially blacklisted. Prepare for the 100 Question War with the Angus Mafia. :hide:

Thanks for the warning. We don't consider ourselves as being in the north though, maybe my rebellious side coming through with posting that picture :lol2:
 

Brute 23

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Ky hills":2gfatw9o said:
Brute 23":2gfatw9o said:
Ky hills":2gfatw9o said:
Just a small number of cows, Angus, and BWF, I like a little bit of Brahman influence. The cows that I have that have a small amount of ear breeding in them, seem to milk well, and raise good sized calves. I have thought about AI'ing some to Brangus or Beefmaster, but have just been using bulls the last 2 years.

:shock: You just just broke two of the CT cardinal rules... using cattle with ear in the north and a crossbred bull. You are officially blacklisted. Prepare for the 100 Question War with the Angus Mafia. :hide:

Thanks for the warning. We don't consider ourselves as being in the north though, maybe my rebellious side coming through with posting that picture :lol2:

Please accept my deepest apology, I meant no offense. :tiphat: I meant north of the Brahman line... not the Mason-Dixon.
 
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Ky hills

Ky hills

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Brute 23":3nivoz6z said:
Ky hills":3nivoz6z said:
Brute 23":3nivoz6z said:
:shock: You just just broke two of the CT cardinal rules... using cattle with ear in the north and a crossbred bull. You are officially blacklisted. Prepare for the 100 Question War with the Angus Mafia. :hide:

Thanks for the warning. We don't consider ourselves as being in the north though, maybe my rebellious side coming through with posting that picture :lol2:

Please accept my deepest apology, I meant no offense. :tiphat: I meant north of the Brahman line... not the Mason-Dixon.

No offense taken. Years ago there were several herds of Santa Gertrudis, and Beefmasters around and a few commercial herds that ran Brahman bulls. In more recent times not as much.
 

Kingfisher

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What do you like about those Angus bulls. That one in the first pic looks pretty stout in the front.
 
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Ky hills

Ky hills

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Kingfisher":3najd0sy said:
What do you like about those Angus bulls. That one in the first pic looks pretty stout in the front.

The main thing that I like about them are that I didn't have to buy them, and they qualify as heifer bulls. I think the first bull is fairly stout. The second bull is long but I do fault him with having a topline that drops down behind his shoulders.
 
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Ky hills

Ky hills

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KNERSIE":1itrfx8y said:
And hard keeping daughters...

I am not intending to disagree with the assessment of this bull, the daughters may very well be hard keepers, but his dam is one of my most dependable cows. She is one of our smaller framed cows, and stays in good condition, while consistently raising calves. This is a picture of her as a heifer in fall of 2012,
 

elkwc

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KNERSIE":1wd30cp8 said:
And hard keeping daughters...
Just curious what makes you think hard keeping daughters?
 

Post Oak

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Brute 23":21wd8dt8 said:
Ky hills":21wd8dt8 said:
Brute 23":21wd8dt8 said:
:shock: You just just broke two of the CT cardinal rules... using cattle with ear in the north and a crossbred bull. You are officially blacklisted. Prepare for the 100 Question War with the Angus Mafia. :hide:

Thanks for the warning. We don't consider ourselves as being in the north though, maybe my rebellious side coming through with posting that picture :lol2:
Where is the Brahman Line? I have always been told I-20.
Please accept my deepest apology, I meant no offense. :tiphat: I meant north of the Brahman line... not the Mason-Dixon.
 

Son of Butch

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elkwc":gpx809ol said:
KNERSIE":gpx809ol said:
And hard keeping daughters...
Just curious what makes you think hard keeping daughters?
Extra heavy milk production cows have higher energy requirements to produce the extra milk, maintain body condition
and breed back in a timely manner. They are the first to suffer when times get lean and so become hard doers.

A long neck, sharp withers, flat rib bones, and flat lean thighs are all dairy characteristics indicative of higher than
average milk production. Some breeders refer to angular cattle exhibiting dairy character as Sharp and when referring
to thicker beefier cattle they would say Round. The use of the terms Sharp and Round when describing cattle goes
back to old timers evaluating dual purpose breeds. I like it because it's simple to understand and accurate in predicting
the type of offspring an individual can be expected to sire. IF your cows are round, round, round then using a Sharp
sire will produce more balanced productive offspring than breeding round, round, round cattle to a round bull.

I consider the bull I pointed out as exhibiting sharp, sharp, round traits for an angus sire.
A secondary trait of a Sharp sire quite often can be spread rear toes. I don't believe the bull pictured has them
and that is why I said sharp, sharp, round. Round cattle usually will have a nice tight foot.
Being "cow hocked" is another secondary fault trait associated with Sharp cattle.
There is a need or place for both Sharp and Round bulls and knowing when and why to select which is what makes
cattle breeding more of an art than a science in the minds of many old school cattlemen.
 

TennesseeTuxedo

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Son of Butch":nlzbezkj said:
elkwc":nlzbezkj said:
KNERSIE":nlzbezkj said:
And hard keeping daughters...
Just curious what makes you think hard keeping daughters?
Extra heavy milk production cows have higher energy requirements to produce the extra milk, maintain body condition
and breed back in a timely manner. They are the first to suffer when times get lean and so become hard doers.

A long neck, sharp withers, flat rib bones, and flat lean thighs are all dairy characteristics indicative of higher than
average milk production. Some breeders refer to angular cattle exhibiting dairy character as Sharp and when referring
to thicker beefier cattle they would say Round. The use of the terms Sharp and Round when describing cattle goes
back to old timers evaluating dual purpose breeds. I like it because it's simple to understand and accurate in predicting
the type of offspring an individual can be expected to sire. IF your cows are round, round, round then using a Sharp
sire will produce more balanced productive offspring than breeding round, round, round cattle to a round bull.

I consider the bull I pointed out as exhibiting sharp, sharp, round traits for an angus sire.
A secondary trait of a Sharp sire quite often can be spread rear toes. I don't believe the bull pictured has them
and that is why I said sharp, sharp, round. Round cattle usually will have a nice tight foot.
Being "cow hocked" is another secondary fault trait associated with Sharp cattle.
There is a need or place for both Sharp and Round bulls and knowing when and why to select which is what makes
cattle breeding more of an art than a science in the minds of many old school cattlemen.

Very informative. Thanks for sharing.
 

Bright Raven

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Son of Butch":30sajgzi said:
elkwc":30sajgzi said:
KNERSIE":30sajgzi said:
And hard keeping daughters...
Just curious what makes you think hard keeping daughters?
Extra heavy milk production cows have higher energy requirements to produce the extra milk, maintain body condition
and breed back in a timely manner. They are the first to suffer when times get lean and so become hard doers.

A long neck, sharp withers, flat rib bones, and flat lean thighs are all dairy characteristics indicative of higher than
average milk production. Some breeders refer to angular cattle exhibiting dairy character as Sharp and when referring
to thicker beefier cattle they would say Round. The use of the terms Sharp and Round when describing cattle goes
back to old timers evaluating dual purpose breeds. I like it because it's simple to understand and accurate in predicting
the type of offspring an individual can be expected to sire. IF your cows are round, round, round then using a Sharp
sire will produce more balanced productive offspring than breeding round, round, round cattle to a round bull.

I consider the bull I pointed out as exhibiting sharp, sharp, round traits for an angus sire.
A secondary trait of a Sharp sire quite often can be spread rear toes. I don't believe the bull pictured has them
and that is why I said sharp, sharp, round. Round cattle usually will have a nice tight foot.
Being "cow hocked" is another secondary fault trait associated with Sharp cattle.
There is a need or place for both Sharp and Round bulls and knowing when and why to select which is what makes
cattle breeding more of an art than a science in the minds of many old school cattlemen.

Well explained. News one can use!!!!

Describe cow hocked. I have heard sickle hocked and a couple other types but not cow hocked.
 

Bright Raven

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Butch,

I think I got the cow hocked trait explained. Comment on the picture if you wish.

 

Brute 23

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Post Oak":5hn9k9hw said:
Brute 23":5hn9k9hw said:
Ky hills":5hn9k9hw said:
Thanks for the warning. We don't consider ourselves as being in the north though, maybe my rebellious side coming through with posting that picture :lol2:

Please accept my deepest apology, I meant no offense. :tiphat: I meant north of the Brahman line... not the Mason-Dixon.

Where is the Brahman Line? I have always been told I-20.

I think its creeping up further north due to global warming now. :D
 

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