Red River or Mojo crabgrass in fescue pastures

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My experience, crabgrass will come on strong at the time that fescue is fading in the summer. Sounds like a good match. But if there are not enough cows grazing continuously to keep the crabgrass eaten, it will overwhelm the fescue and smother it out quite a bit. Resulting in a thinner stand of fescue.
Saw your post yesterday and thought it was interesting you said the crabgrass would end up somewhat smothering the fescue. That seemed a bit out of character for the red river crabgrass (in my neck of the woods) and then I noticed you were in South Carolina. That explains everything and your example shows how what works in one part of the country one way might work totally different or not at all in another part.
 
It works well in that it breaks up the compaction and doesn't destroy the Bahia.
The goal/intent is to 'shake things up a bit', not 'pulverize and obliterate'. You don't want too much of a good thing. I posted earlier on this thread that I know a producer that uses a light discing every 2-4 years. I like the idea of the harrow better as it still creates the needed disturbance but does less damage to the perennial grass, whether it be fescue or Bahia.
 
It doesn't take very much disturbance for the crabgrass to germinate, apparently. That's a nice looking harrow, but can't tear up too much with it, I wouldn't think.
Crabgrass seed is often mixed and spread with fertilizer when top dressing wheat in the early spring here.
 
So Grazon will kill out the crabgrass or at least the seeds? What about 2-4D or 2-4D-b?
Grazon does not kill the crabgrass per se, but the anti-germination component does not discriminate as to which seeds it stops from geminating. Therefore, it stops all seeds from germinating, including crabgrass. (Credit to CB for pointing that out to me a long time ago).

2-4D does not contain the anti-germination component. It only affects the broadleaf plant itself.
 
I was not familiar with 24D-B so had to look it up. Says it will not kill common legumes. What is considered common?
I hadn't heard of it either until I was talking with guy at local feed store/elevator. I was talking about I hate killing out my clover with spray and he mentioned it because it won't kill clover. Said he's only got few guys that use it and typically for soybeans.
 
I hadn't heard of it either until I was talking with guy at local feed store/elevator. I was talking about I hate killing out my clover with spray and he mentioned it because it won't kill clover. Said he's only got few guys that use it and typically for soybeans.
Thanks. I spot spray mostly but will do more if it doesn't kill clover
 
Has anyone spread crabgrass in existing fescue pastures to pick up for the summer slump? I'm talking decent fescue stands.
I killed 50 acres with Round up pro the middle of March. 35 acres was mixed grasses with about 40 % of that being Tall fescue and it had a lot of Crabgrass mixed with the Tall fescue. But the 40% that had the tall fescue didn't have as much crabgrass growing among the fescue.

Killed everything down to dirt. Killed all the fescue out and it didn't come back. But the crab grass has. If crabgrass had of been my goal I would be a happy man right now.

The whole thirty five acres was before I bought it probably at some time all tall fescue. Because the fescue is spotty in the other 60 % of the 35 acres I killed out.

It's unreal at how much Crab grass has come up it areas that even didn't have crab grass.
 
Has anyone spread crabgrass in existing fescue pastures to pick up for the summer slump? I'm talking decent fescue stands.
Hey @BFE, I think your original post here pre-dated me joining but not by much. I haven't looked through this thread carefully to see if you've done this yet, but the answer to this question is yes. As a follow up to your question, "Does it work?", the answer is yes. "Does it persist/reseed?" Yes, for many years. I'll qualify my answer by saying it depends on how "decent" of a stand of tall fescue you have. If your existing stand is as thick as a well cared for golf course, don't expect to be able to graze a cow to the acre on the establishing crabgrass though. ;). I'm talking a locality not too different from where you are, Southeast Ohio. The producer stopped trying to maintain the crabgrass years ago, but last I looked (pre-pandemic actually) the crabgrass still returned to a degree without any encouragement. Not necessarily enough to make a difference, but it was there. With some care and maintenance, I think it would be at least 'productive' at a minimum.
 

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