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Prolapse

bball

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So calving season is underway here and thankfully, we have had the mildest winter i can ever remember in Indiana.
I have 4 Hereford first calvers. First 2 went off great. Had the 3rd in the barn last weekend in preparation for her calving. Went out first thing Sat am to check her (as she was getting close and we were leaving to go 2 hours north to watch the boy wrestle at semi state finals) and i was pleased to see a healthy new calf laying in the straw and the new dam was licking him. I thought, Perfect! She had the calf no problems and away i would go. WRONG! She spun around and most of what should have been her innards had now become her outtards. Major uterine and rectal prolapses. Of course, I have no time for this, as I had a vehicle loaded up with folks to head north for the wrestling matches. Fortunately, I have an exceptional vet service nearby. She came out quickly. My FIL met her there and they got her put back together with some degree of effort; thus, permitting me to roll north. Doc gave her a 50/50 shot of making it. So far, so good. Bright eyed, eating, drinking and nursing her calf.
I am just a small hobby guy with 25 cows. Been around cattle growing up as a boy and got back into them in 98. Had never had a prolapse before this one, but had never owned any fullblood Hereford cattle either. Thought i read somewhere that the Herefords can have more of a predisposition for prolapse compared to other breeds.
I'm just pleased she made it(so far) and will raise the calf. Will cull in fall.

Wish I had snapped some pics, but was in a rush and neglected to. :(
 

wbvs58

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Herefords have a history of more vaginal prolapses before calving but these don't usually end up as uterine prolapses post calving. I wouldn't put Herefords as being more prone to uterine prolapses post calving as many other breeds. I have not had to deal with many uterine prolapses but in my small experience I thought that Charolais were over represented. I will be interested to see what Aaron has to say about this.

Hope she continues to go well for you.

Ken
 

Caustic Burno

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wbvs58 said:
Herefords have a history of more vaginal prolapses before calving but these don't usually end up as uterine prolapses post calving. I wouldn't put Herefords as being more prone to uterine prolapses post calving as many other breeds. I have not had to deal with many uterine prolapses but in my small experience I thought that Charolais were over represented. I will be interested to see what Aaron has to say about this.

Hope she continues to go well for you.

Ken
I concur
I raised Herefords for decades and only ever had one of the breed prolapse.
The worst I ever dealt with was a sim-Angus cross heifer not known for that issue.
 

Buck Randall

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Uterine prolapses aren't very heritable or repeatable, in my experience. Cows that prolapse and recover don't generally do it again. Especially if she had a big calf, the problem is likely that the calf got hung up in the uterus and started to invert it on the way out. Just bad luck for the heifer.
 

Silver

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I would never cull a cow that had a uterine prolapse based on the fact that she prolapsed. If she didn't breed back on time then she'd have to go.
 

gcreekrch

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Silver said:
I would never cull a cow that had a uterine prolapse based on the fact that she prolapsed. If she didn't breed back on time then she'd have to go.


I agree, vaginal prolapse on the other hand are inheritable and should be culled.
 

bball

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Buck Randall said:
Uterine prolapses aren't very heritable or repeatable, in my experience. Cows that prolapse and recover don't generally do it again. Especially if she had a big calf, the problem is likely that the calf got hung up in the uterus and started to invert it on the way out. Just bad luck for the heifer.

Buck, she had a decent sized bull calf, but i wouldnt say big. Appreciate your thoughts.
 

bball

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This is very intriguing. Perhaps i will contact Doc and inquire about her rationale for culling if its not a significant risk for repeating.
 

TCRanch

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Bball, you already know my opinion but clearly I'm not a vet and she must have had a reason for suggesting you cull. I would definitely find out why.

FWIW, my heifer that prolapsed was on an incline, facing up, and my vet suspected that contributed to it.
 

Farmgirl

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After many years had my first uterine prolapse (hopefully my last). A first calf heifer. Vet got her put back together but said next 24 hrs were critical. I was surprised to learn that it is not heritable nor usually repeatable.

What about breed back? What has the been the experience?

Thanks,
Farmgirl
 

TCRanch

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After many years had my first uterine prolapse (hopefully my last). A first calf heifer. Vet got her put back together but said next 24 hrs were critical. I was surprised to learn that it is not heritable nor usually repeatable.

What about breed back? What has the been the experience?

Thanks,
Farmgirl
Yes, the first 24 hours are critical, primarily because of the potential for internal bleeding.

My first calf heifer that prolapsed (in the middle of the night) was bred immediately after turning out the bulls and has continued to be one of the first to calve, currently bred with her 7th. Plus, she raises a whopper!
 

Buck Randall

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After many years had my first uterine prolapse (hopefully my last). A first calf heifer. Vet got her put back together but said next 24 hrs were critical. I was surprised to learn that it is not heritable nor usually repeatable.

What about breed back? What has the been the experience?

Thanks,
Farmgirl
Most of the ones I've seen breed back. Sometimes the bad ones get scarring inside the uterus that prevents them from settling. If you're able to handle her, a couple of lutalyse shots prior to breeding can help clean out any dirt or debris that might not have gotten washed off before putting the uterus back in.
 

Dempster

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Most of these that survive will breed back, I think you should keep her if she breeds. Relapse rate is minimal, partly because it is primarily first calvers that prolapse, quite a bit more rare to see an adult prolapse and most of those didn't prolapse as heifers. Biggest risk is death, probably 1/3 anyway of these do not survive. The 2 main factors that decide if they survive are temperment of animal and quality/availability of working facilities. The ones that run around a lot and swing the uterus around are the ones that don't survive.
 

LJCB

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Had a 5 year old angus cow I bought prolapse with dead twins. Never seen anything like it and she survived and she went to town
 

ita47

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I had a really nice 1st calf heifer that prolapsed after she gave birth. Was able to get the vet there in time, he got everything put back in. I thought I would have to cull her after she weaned the calf but he said she would be fine, so I kept her. That was three years ago and she just had her 3rd calf with no issues.
 

Lucky_P

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Uterine prolapse is essentially an accident. Those cows no more likely to repeat than any other cow in herd.
Vaginal prolapse...she needs a dose of trailermycin; her daughters will be suspect, too.
A
 

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