Possible replacements, pic em apart..

Help Support CattleToday:

tom4018

Dumb Old Farmer
Joined
Jan 2, 2004
Messages
4,085
Reaction score
173
Location
Kentucky
85.jpg


1/2 Angus 1/2 Char heifer 5 1/2 months old

83.jpg


6 1/2 month old Reg. Angus
 
#1 - Yes

#2 - No. She has sloping rump which will NOT improve with age, fine boned, "breedy head", reasonably good top line for a calf, sickle hocked. Depending to great extent on her dam, she probably will not be too successful with "Feed Efficiency" testing results. How successful is her dam in the "Great Breeding Cow" classification department? Successful is as Successful DOES!

DOC HARRIS
 
Really like the first one.

The second heifer lack to balance and substance I want. I don't see the slight slope she has from hooks to pins as a problem, although her structure isn't perfect her sickle hockedness is still well within the accepted limits.
 
The first one is great. The black heifer is not on her level but she is not hopeless, merely a little thinner in conformation imo.
( and I am no fan of either angus nor charolais)
 
Both heifers will work just fine for replacements. How the heck did you get a black calf from 1/2 char 1/2 Angus. I've had 100's of the F-1 cross and never seen it. Sometimes from the F-1 cow bred black we get a black calf.
 
#1 a deff yess, good bone, width and depth. nice heifer.
#2 needs more bone, lacking in muscling in the rear, keen boned, and note very level from her hooks to her pins.
 
mnmtranching":kjvwsmtn said:
Both heifers will work just fine for replacements. How the heck did you get a black calf from 1/2 char 1/2 Angus. I've had 100's of the F-1 cross and never seen it. Sometimes from the F-1 cow bred black we get a black calf.


You have the tags mixed up. The first one is the 1/2&1/2. The second is a reg Angus
 
To answer your question about getting a black charolais angus cross.
You need to get a registered/papered purebred Homozygous Black charolais bull. You can only get them in Canada right now but youll see them quickly in the states Three trees Ranch out of Georgia has some they bought from Canada and I have heard of some females going into Alabama also. Grace farms out of missouri has a few purebred black charolais out of Canada as well as some people down by Kansas. It will be the way to go pretty soon since the angus cross commercial breeders want to add frame and size to there commercial heard. The more pounds they can put on there calves = more$ in there pocket with still retaining the black hide. Talked to one breeder in Canada who uses these black bulls and he said he would not go back to the angus sires because he gets more weaning weight on his calves out of the black charolais bulls and in his words "they still sell calves by the pound". He also followed some of his calves through the feedlots and said ALL of the angus /black char calves were sold to the packers and went AAA and choice angus beef because they fit the criteria and had black hides which I found quite interesting.
 
billy":20loogc4 said:
To answer your question about getting a black charolais angus cross.
You need to get a registered/papered purebred Homozygous Black charolais bull. You can only get them in Canada right now but youll see them quickly in the states Three trees Ranch out of Georgia has some they bought from Canada and I have heard of some females going into Alabama also. Grace farms out of missouri has a few purebred black charolais out of Canada as well as some people down by Kansas. It will be the way to go pretty soon since the angus cross commercial breeders want to add frame and size to there commercial heard. The more pounds they can put on there calves = more$ in there pocket with still retaining the black hide. Talked to one breeder in Canada who uses these black bulls and he said he would not go back to the angus sires because he gets more weaning weight on his calves out of the black charolais bulls and in his words "they still sell calves by the pound". He also followed some of his calves through the feedlots and said ALL of the angus /black char calves were sold to the packers and went AAA and choice angus beef because they fit the criteria and had black hides which I found quite interesting.
oxymoron? - how do you ever get a black 100% char calf?
 
*Cowgirl*":rxb1gn26 said:
billy":rxb1gn26 said:
To answer your question about getting a black charolais angus cross.
You need to get a registered/papered purebred Homozygous Black charolais bull. You can only get them in Canada right now but youll see them quickly in the states Three trees Ranch out of Georgia has some they bought from Canada and I have heard of some females going into Alabama also. Grace farms out of missouri has a few purebred black charolais out of Canada as well as some people down by Kansas. It will be the way to go pretty soon since the angus cross commercial breeders want to add frame and size to there commercial heard. The more pounds they can put on there calves = more$ in there pocket with still retaining the black hide. Talked to one breeder in Canada who uses these black bulls and he said he would not go back to the angus sires because he gets more weaning weight on his calves out of the black charolais bulls and in his words "they still sell calves by the pound". He also followed some of his calves through the feedlots and said ALL of the angus /black char calves were sold to the packers and went AAA and choice angus beef because they fit the criteria and had black hides which I found quite interesting.
oxymoron? - how do you ever get a black 100% char calf?

Not an oxymoron. He didn't say full blood. He said pure bred. There is a difference. He also didn't use the term 100%. I could be wrong but I believe in most breds that are " bred up " they are considered purebred at 94% which I believe os the 4th cross back to the original blood
 
DOC HARRIS":3n3zjc69 said:
#1 - Yes

#2 - No. She has sloping rump which will NOT improve with age, fine boned, "breedy head", reasonably good top line for a calf, sickle hocked. Depending to great extent on her dam, she probably will not be too successful with "Feed Efficiency" testing results. How successful is her dam in the "Great Breeding Cow" classification department? Successful is as Successful DOES!

DOC HARRIS

Both calves are the second from each cow. I had the mother of the Charolais cow, she raised heavy weaning calves. I thought the Angus calf was really not that bad, she is fairly thick but I agree she is a little finer boned than I like. Her mother is a nice looking cow, although they all have their faults. I may feed a few heifers a little while and see what they look like as they grow a little more. We only feed them just a little grain and free choice hay so they are not going to set a growth record.
 
I like the first one, don't care for the second one at all.
 
KNERSIE-

The second heifer lack to balance and substance I want. I don't see the slight slope she has from hooks to pins as a problem, although her structure isn't perfect her sickle hockedness is still well within the accepted limits
Not the way that I see this second heifer! The slope is more than slight, the sickle hockedness is NOT within MY accepted limits. In analyzing potential replacements, I am not going to select an individual who has all the ear-marks of breaking down after two or three calves, and lacks beefiness to the point where I am going to have to select a bull to correct a flaw that should not have been there in the first place.

DOC HARRIS
 
I grow a fair number of heifers like your Angus and by the time they're calving the second time they look just fine. Maybe my eye is crooked, but her legs don't look so bad to me.

Do your cows work in your environment? Do they get in calf easily, calve each year and raise acceptable amounts of beef? Is their disposition acceptable?

There are a lot of cattle posted on here and sometimes I think there's not much difference between some of those which are praised and those which are thoroughly shot down.

Disclaimer: a number of people told me my cattle were crap, so I'm full of sour grapes. ;-)
 

Latest posts

Top