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Anonymous

hey i just inherited 40 acres in north central texas and was thinking about putting some cattle on it. I need some good advice so as to avoid as many mistakes as possible. the acreage is mostly pasture(native grasses) and fenced around the perimeter. What would you guys do? I mainly just want to supplement my present income.



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Anonymous

> hey i just inherited 40 acres in
> north central texas and was
> thinking about putting some cattle
> on it. I need some good advice so
> as to avoid as many mistakes as
> possible. the acreage is mostly
> pasture(native grasses) and fenced
> around the perimeter. What would
> you guys do? I mainly just want to
> supplement my present income.

It depends which side of I35 your land is on. If it is east of I35 you would be able to run about 1 cow per 2 to 3 acres; on the west side you could raise less cows, mabe 1 cow per 3 to 5 acres. So for forty acres of grass east of I35 you would be able to support about 16 cows at an average of 2.5 acres per cow. For a cow/calf program your annual cow maintence costs would be about $350 to $450 per cow per year with proper management. Management practices would include cross fencing the 40 Ac. into smaller paddocks to allow the grass time to regrow between grazing; grass needs about 30 days rest to recover. With your cow costs per year averaging $400 per cow that would require $6400 per year to feed and manage the herd. your expected income today might be 16 cows producing a 90 percient calf crop with good management would produce 14 calves, half bulls and half heifers. Assume you keep the calves on the cows until they reach 500 lbs., about six to eight months. You might wean the calves and put them on a preconditioning program for 45 days and sell them to a order buyer or throught the local sale barn, announcing the preconditioning program, they may bring about .85 to 1.00 per lb. for the bulls and .80 to .95 per lb. for the heifers. The 7 bulls would gross an average of $3237.50 and the heifers would average $3062.50. Your possible average gross income would be $6300. Now you have not considered the cost of the cows or any death loss and already you have loss $100. Also if you don't live nearby feeding in the winter may be a problem.

You might do better with stockers (weaned calves weighting about 500 lbs) and put them on grass until they reach about 750 lbs. you can run more of them and if you only graze them during the growing season you would not have to worry about feeding in the winter.

Better than that learn how to grow grasses and contract to graze out other peoples calves. Your inveatment would be less and you may have an advantage to make money.

The beef business offers a good tax write off on your income taxes and if you are large enough you might even make a few dollars.

Good luck, Harry



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Anonymous

> It depends which side of I35 your
> land is on. If it is east of I35
> you would be able to run about 1
> cow per 2 to 3 acres; on the west
> side you could raise less cows,
> mabe 1 cow per 3 to 5 acres. So
> for forty acres of grass east of
> I35 you would be able to support
> about 16 cows at an average of 2.5
> acres per cow. For a cow/calf
> program your annual cow maintence
> costs would be about $350 to $450
> per cow per year with proper
> management. Management practices
> would include cross fencing the 40
> Ac. into smaller paddocks to allow
> the grass time to regrow between
> grazing; grass needs about 30 days
> rest to recover. With your cow
> costs per year averaging $400 per
> cow that would require $6400 per
> year to feed and manage the herd.
> your expected income today might
> be 16 cows producing a 90 percient
> calf crop with good management
> would produce 14 calves, half
> bulls and half heifers. Assume you
> keep the calves on the cows until
> they reach 500 lbs., about six to
> eight months. You might wean the
> calves and put them on a
> preconditioning program for 45
> days and sell them to a order
> buyer or throught the local sale
> barn, announcing the
> preconditioning program, they may
> bring about .85 to 1.00 per lb.
> for the bulls and .80 to .95 per
> lb. for the heifers. The 7 bulls
> would gross an average of $3237.50
> and the heifers would average
> $3062.50. Your possible average
> gross income would be $6300. Now
> you have not considered the cost
> of the cows or any death loss and
> already you have loss $100. Also
> if you don't live nearby feeding
> in the winter may be a problem.

> You might do better with stockers
> (weaned calves weighting about 500
> lbs) and put them on grass until
> they reach about 750 lbs. you can
> run more of them and if you only
> graze them during the growing
> season you would not have to worry
> about feeding in the winter.

> Better than that learn how to grow
> grasses and contract to graze out
> other peoples calves. Your
> inveatment would be less and you
> may have an advantage to make
> money.

> The beef business offers a good
> tax write off on your income taxes
> and if you are large enough you
> might even make a few dollars.

> Good luck, Harry

Another though, you may want to just grow hay for the cattle producers in the area and sell it by the ton or bale. The better the hay the higher the price you can charge. Contact your local extension office for information on all of this. Good luck again,

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A

Anonymous

> It depends which side of I35 your
> land is on. If it is east of I35
> you would be able to run about 1
> cow per 2 to 3 acres; on the west
> side you could raise less cows,
> mabe 1 cow per 3 to 5 acres. So
> for forty acres of grass east of
> I35 you would be able to support
> about 16 cows at an average of 2.5
> acres per cow. For a cow/calf
> program your annual cow maintence
> costs would be about $350 to $450
> per cow per year with proper
> management. Management practices
> would include cross fencing the 40
> Ac. into smaller paddocks to allow
> the grass time to regrow between
> grazing; grass needs about 30 days
> rest to recover. With your cow
> costs per year averaging $400 per
> cow that would require $6400 per
> year to feed and manage the herd.
> your expected income today might
> be 16 cows producing a 90 percient
> calf crop with good management
> would produce 14 calves, half
> bulls and half heifers. Assume you
> keep the calves on the cows until
> they reach 500 lbs., about six to
> eight months. You might wean the
> calves and put them on a
> preconditioning program for 45
> days and sell them to a order
> buyer or throught the local sale
> barn, announcing the
> preconditioning program, they may
> bring about .85 to 1.00 per lb.
> for the bulls and .80 to .95 per
> lb. for the heifers. The 7 bulls
> would gross an average of $3237.50
> and the heifers would average
> $3062.50. Your possible average
> gross income would be $6300. Now
> you have not considered the cost
> of the cows or any death loss and
> already you have loss $100. Also
> if you don't live nearby feeding
> in the winter may be a problem.

> You might do better with stockers
> (weaned calves weighting about 500
> lbs) and put them on grass until
> they reach about 750 lbs. you can
> run more of them and if you only
> graze them during the growing
> season you would not have to worry
> about feeding in the winter.

> Better than that learn how to grow
> grasses and contract to graze out
> other peoples calves. Your
> inveatment would be less and you
> may have an advantage to make
> money.

> The beef business offers a good
> tax write off on your income taxes
> and if you are large enough you
> might even make a few dollars.

> Good luck, Harry

can you tell me what the $400 per cow for maint consists of..ie can you give me an example of what costs you incur on a regular basis for a cow/calve operation..thnks in advance

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Anonymous

At Running Arrow Farm our accumulative "moving average" maintenance costs for our cattle is averaging about $38 per month per 1000# unit. This includes hay, minerals, supplemental feed for some as needed, range cubes. Vaccination costs and registrations add a little to the yearly tab. My guess at this point is that our monthly average costs for a 1000# equivalent animal for all costs is probably not more than $45 a month, including indirect overhead (insurance, etc.)

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Anonymous

you mentioned regular costs and bill gave you a pretty good rundown on those(he mentioned vaccinations, but you can include dewormers and insecticides). other costs you might incur, depending on your management program could be fertilizer & herbicide, seed for seasonal grasses (we plant oats & ryegrass in the winter), fencing, and unforeseen vet bills. with registered cattle, we also have advertising, registrations, performance data fees, a.i. costs (semen, certificates, sleeves, etc).
 
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A

Anonymous

> can you tell me what the $400 per
> cow for maint consists of..ie can
> you give me an example of what
> costs you incur on a regular basis
> for a cow/calve operation..thnks
> in advance

Bill: Other posters have basicly answered the question. By working with many farmers/ranchers and bankers, I developed a software program that runs on Excel that is easy to use. The name of the program is COW COSTS. You can see an ad for it in the classifieds on this web site or in the 2004 NASCO farm catolog at <A HREF="http://www.nasco.com" TARGET="_blank">www.nasco.com</A>.



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A

Anonymous

> Bill: Other posters have basicly
> answered the question. By working
> with many farmers/ranchers and
> bankers, I developed a software
> program that runs on Excel that is
> easy to use. The name of the
> program is COW COSTS. You can see
> an ad for it in the classifieds on
> this web site or in the 2004 NASCO
> farm catolog at <A HREF="http://www.nasco.com" TARGET="_blank">www.nasco.com</A> . The correct address for NASCO is <A HREF="http://www.enasco.com" TARGET="_blank">www.enasco.com</A>



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Anonymous

Never, Never, Never put these kind of figures in print. If my wife finds out what I'm spending on my cattle she'll have a fit. Right now I have her convinced I'm breaking even, but I don't know how long this will hold up!

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A

Anonymous

> Never, Never, Never put these kind
> of figures in print. If my wife
> finds out what I'm spending on my
> cattle she'll have a fit. Right
> now I have her convinced I'm
> breaking even, but I don't know
> how long this will hold up!

DRB; You need COW COSTS, the software planning program that will allow you to plan for profit and work your plan.

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A

Anonymous

> At Running Arrow Farm our
> accumulative "moving
> average" maintenance costs
> for our cattle is averaging about
> $38 per month per 1000# unit. This
> includes hay, minerals,
> supplemental feed for some as
> needed, range cubes. Vaccination
> costs and registrations add a
> little to the yearly tab. My guess
> at this point is that our monthly
> average costs for a 1000#
> equivalent animal for all costs is
> probably not more than $45 a
> month, including indirect overhead
> (insurance, etc.)

Running Arrow: Your annual per Cow Costs would be about $540 per cow. Unless you are running registered stock you may want to put the pencil to it a bit more closely. COW COSTS planning software would help to plan for profit and eliminate any waste.

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Anonymous

LOL... yea, i get some funny looks from mine every now and then when something slips out when i am talking to one of my cow buddies....

she really understands... but i think it is the shock of just how much it really does take to keep a cow going for a year... a lot of people dont realize just how much it does take..

gene

> Never, Never, Never put these kind
> of figures in print. If my wife
> finds out what I'm spending on my
> cattle she'll have a fit. Right
> now I have her convinced I'm
> breaking even, but I don't know
> how long this will hold up!



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A

Anonymous

Thanks for the input and "corrected" costs per year per head.

Yes, we are running pureblood, registered foundation/seedstock. Our weanling up through yearling "calves" have been selling for up to $2,000 per head via Private Treaty (so far, so good).

Was your $540. per head cost based on the software program? If so, might be something we might want to use.

Our herd management software is "LonghornMax" ; they have another version for regular beef cattle called "CattleMax". We have a link to their site on our own website.

Thanks again!

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Anonymous

Livestock purchase and management costs are very inexpensive compared to raising human children. Don't have to send livestock to college, senior proms, special uniforms, and all that. Not to mention, costs for having a baby vs. having a calf.

So much for my unusual sense of humor...lol.

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A

Anonymous

> Thanks for the input and
> "corrected" costs per
> year per head.

> Yes, we are running pureblood,
> registered foundation/seedstock.
> Our weanling up through yearling
> "calves" have been
> selling for up to $2,000 per head
> via Private Treaty (so far, so
> good).

> Was your $540. per head cost based
> on the software program? If so,
> might be something we might want
> to use.

> Our herd management software is
> "LonghornMax" ; they
> have another version for regular
> beef cattle called
> "CattleMax". We have a
> link to their site on our own
> website.

> Thanks again!

The COW COSTS program is not a cattle management program it is a cost planning program. The programs you mentioned will manage cattle well but is quite complicated on the cost planning side. The figure I stated is your figure times twelve. I don't know your verious inputs or expenses. If I had that information I could use COW COSTS and determine your cost with in a half hour or less. It would also tell me your breakeven point and itemize each input cost on a per cow bases. It is an easy to use annual planner that will compair actural vs planned input costs. You plan for the future rather than analysis the past records.

If you are interested in seeing a brochure email me at <A HREF="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</A> and I will attach the brochure and email it back to you.



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Anonymous

> Livestock purchase and management
> costs are very inexpensive
> compared to raising human
> children. Don't have to send
> livestock to college, senior
> proms, special uniforms, and all
> that. Not to mention, costs for
> having a baby vs. having a calf.

> So much for my unusual sense of
> humor...lol.

Boy are you right. Can you emagine the cost per cow if we had to do all for the cows that we do for our childern? how about buying the first car? wow.

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Anonymous

Gene, I see that the marvels of modern medicine worked its wonders again....I told ya we were all born with extra parts and it wouldnt hurt us to lose a few...Hope recovery is going well and check your email or give me a call!
 
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Anonymous

sorry eric, but you lost me on this one??? recovery???

gene

> Gene, I see that the marvels of
> modern medicine worked its wonders
> again....I told ya we were all
> born with extra parts and it
> wouldnt hurt us to lose a
> few...Hope recovery is going well
> and check your email or give me a
> call!



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Anonymous

> sorry eric, but you lost me on
> this one??? recovery???

> gene

didnt you have surgery yesterday?
 

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