New Livestock Trailer's Quality-Strength-Durability versus old? Your Thoughts

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What are your thoughts on new livestock trailers (quality-strength-durability) versus the ones being built 20, even 10 years ago? After making a few trips this year sales barn I saw several new livestock trailers and they all looked thinner (metal) and lighter (less metal). I haul with an old 30 year old trailer. It's a 1991 16' CM trailer, well maintained, rust free Oklahoma trailer purchased for $2,500. I added new tires, new floor, enhanced electrical mods made. Axles and bearings were exellent- no service needed.
I'm wondering how well these new trailer's sides/gates/doors will hold up to hauling cattle that are kicking and pushing? Giving the normal depreciation of livestock trailers and conditions would you buy new or old? What years, types, models would you look for in buying a used livestock trailer?
 
My "between farms " trailer is a '93 16' CM steel gooseneck. It has had the ever living $hit beat out of it. I have added and welded to make it handier for my use.
Pull all Wilson trailers when going to town.
I would say any trailer brand that is made to the same specs as their semi pots; as far as gates, ramps, sides are concerned. Is probably worth the money for a new one.
 
It doe's seem that some of the newer trailers are built out of thinner material than the older trailers. This isn't necessarily a bad thing though. When you get into the 28-32' cattle trailers they can get pretty heavy empty so lighter material with better engineering would be a good thing. It seemes to me that the older trailers with the flatter wider side panels rattle allot more than the newer trailers with the tubular sides. The rattling to me says the trailer may not be as sturdy. Some of the 20 plus year old trailers are just really really heavy.
 
What are your thoughts on new livestock trailers (quality-strength-durability) versus the ones being built 20, even 10 years ago? After making a few trips this year sales barn I saw several new livestock trailers and they all looked thinner (metal) and lighter (less metal). I haul with an old 30 year old trailer. It's a 1991 16' CM trailer, well maintained, rust free Oklahoma trailer purchased for $2,500. I added new tires, new floor, enhanced electrical mods made. Axles and bearings were exellent- no service needed.
I'm wondering how well these new trailer's sides/gates/doors will hold up to hauling cattle that are kicking and pushing? Giving the normal depreciation of livestock trailers and conditions would you buy new or old? What years, types, models would you look for in buying a used livestock trailer?

I just bought a new CornPro it is built ok but not nearly as well as my old one
 
I have a Wilson I bought new 10 years ago. Compared to the old Morgan built I had previously it is 10 times the trailer. The guy I bought it from sells a lot of trailers. He said it is the only brand that holds up to the abuse the cowboys put them through. These guys will pull a trailer through places I don't want to ride my quad through. Dragging one humpty bump through the sage brush where 4 wheel drive is required with a full load of cows is just all in a days work.
 
I used a Chaparral trailer back in the 70s until it rusted out and had gone several years without a trailer. I did purchase a new chaparral trailer three years ago from the same dealer. they build them right their from scratch. I would say they are built better than my original one.
 
A lot of the newer aluminum trailers are thinner but stronger due to higher tensile aluminum sheet. The metal is very hard and why they don't dent when kicked.

I pull a big bend steel trailer. Its not a conventional built steel traler like gooseneck brand or neckover. It has rectangular tube sides and a space all around the bottom to let manure out. Lifetime cleated rubber floor. It cleans itself out better than any I have seen. They are a little more expensive than others but have many standard features that are options on others.
 
My 1990 Featherlite was noticeably thicker metal than the newer Featherlite's.

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My 2000 CM I believe is also thicker than the newer ones. Both are nice trailers, but I like the CM better especially without the big storage nose of the Feather lite as you can see much better behind.

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Third floor in 50 years.
Saw a Hanover just like for sale the other day.
I will have to look and see if it's still there.
They were made in Bryan College Station.BA12B24A-52FF-4125-B123-222A78ECCBD4.jpeg
 

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My old CornPro was built like a tank. It was ugly because it had been painted many times by the time I bought it but was still built well. The New CornPro we bought in 2022 is nowhere near as well built and I doubt last as long.
 
Ironic this comes up. Looking for a trailer at this time. Been looking at alot of them. I did notice that most trailer " stores " have a couple newer Deltas that had to be resprayed and sold as "like new". My budget isn't huge but want something that lasts. Looking at 10-12 year old trailers so far.
 
I lean towards older stuff in general because anything I do becomes a comedy of errors and it's an easier pill to swallow to have to make fairly mediocre repairs to things that are at least half my age or older than me.
A "comedy of errors"

I like it, and might even use it to help me explain my life to my wife, when she's ready to hear that, again.
It's a wise person that can roll daily frustration into humor. It's not easy, but it is how I manage my sanity.
 
A "comedy of errors"

I like it, and might even use it to help me explain my life to my wife, when she's ready to hear that, again.
It's a wise person that can roll daily frustration into humor. It's not easy, but it is how I manage my sanity.
I call it the stupid tax, you have to pay it multiple times.
 
Third floor in 50 years.
Saw a Hanover just like for sale the other day.
I will have to look and see if it's still there.
They were made in Bryan College Station.View attachment 32525
That's a great idea CB...hog wire/cattle panel secured to the floor. I think I'll go that route on my new floor...i've been using a pale full of crushed corn spread around.
 

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