Longhorn Market

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Anonymous

How is the market for selling Longhorns these days? Are they a good investment for someone starting a cattle herd? I don't know a whole lot about marketing strategies when it comes to Longhorns, but from what I understand it is a private treaty or consignment market only. I am taking care of a few head for someone, and was just curious about the opportunities available to him. The owner of the cattle seems to think it is a good investment.
 
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Anonymous

It’s amazing that this hasn’t gotten a response yet, much less started a small war. Bottom line is that if you want them for aesthetic reasons, or to sell with people who don’t want/need to make money off them and just want to look at them, suit yourself. If you are wanting to run a cow/calf production herd, avoid longhorns like the plague.

Craig-TX
 
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Anonymous

I am also suprised that this subject hasn't generated more discussion.

I also feel that the market is limited when it comes to selling Longhorns. Seems you have to find just the right buyer and have the right bloodlines, or you may loose a lot of money.

I know more about raising calves for beef than for horns or other traits.

I was just curious as to what other cattleman think of Longhorns. As I said earlier, I'm only taking care of them, I don't have any money invested in the cows.
 
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Anonymous

As a breeder of registered Longhorns I'll put my 2 cents worth in here...lol.

I'll agree with the "Angus" and other commercial people that Longhorns are not a mainstream market for people wanting to breed, raise, fatten, sell their animals to the usual commercial type markets. Even though the Longhorn breed has been in the USA for some 500 years, it is still considered a nitch market. We do not breed, raise, and sell Longhorns for the PRIMARY purpose of raising beef for slaughter.

The longhorn market is a multi-state one whereby breeders probably sell as many Longhorns out of state as they do instate (if not more). Bloodlines, pedigrees, colors are chased across state lines to complement one's herd program.

Longhorns are almost always sold via Private Treaty to individuals and ranches, at specialty Longhorn auctions, and other selected sales events. Only on a very rare occasion is one or more sold at a local market.

The market for Longhorns include raising foundation sires and dams, pedigree specialization for breeding stock, breeding for increased horn length, breeding for body conformation, providing cross-breeding animals for first calf heifers, occasionally raising roping stock, and raising low cholesterol & low fat beef. Longhorn steers are also used for show, riding, and parade events since they are easily trained.

Other Longhorn "after market" products include skulls and horns mounts, colorful hides, hoof/scrotum/tail mounted ornaments.

Finally, since Longhorns are sole "each" rather than "by the pound," they command high prices (often in the thousands of $$). Top end sires and dams are often sold at specialty auctions for tens of thousands of dollars. Longhorn semen often sells between $10 and $300 per straw, depending on scarcity, pedigree, and other factors.

Some individuals purchase Longhorns for personal pasture attractions; some businesses purchase them for front pasture ornaments to call attention to their corporate or industrial operation. A colorful and very long horned animal is "worth its weight in gold" so to speak for those "ornamental" purposes. Incidentally, the longest horned steer still alive is around 110" spread, tip to tip.

[email protected]
 
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Anonymous

Thanks for your response Bill. That was my thinking on the marketing of Longhorns too. It appears that to get the best prices for these cattle you have to build a good reputation, develop good stock, and "beat the bushes" so to speak, for some good buyers or special sales.

-----------------------------------
> As a breeder of registered
> Longhorns I'll put my 2 cents
> worth in here...lol.

> I'll agree with the
> "Angus" and other
> commercial people that Longhorns
> are not a mainstream market for
> people wanting to breed, raise,
> fatten, sell their animals to the
> usual commercial type markets.
> Even though the Longhorn breed has
> been in the USA for some 500
> years, it is still considered a
> nitch market. We do not breed,
> raise, and sell Longhorns for the
> PRIMARY purpose of raising beef
> for slaughter.

> The longhorn market is a
> multi-state one whereby breeders
> probably sell as many Longhorns
> out of state as they do instate
> (if not more). Bloodlines,
> pedigrees, colors are chased
> across state lines to complement
> one's herd program.

> Longhorns are almost always sold
> via Private Treaty to individuals
> and ranches, at specialty Longhorn
> auctions, and other selected sales
> events. Only on a very rare
> occasion is one or more sold at a
> local market.

> The market for Longhorns include
> raising foundation sires and dams,
> pedigree specialization for
> breeding stock, breeding for
> increased horn length, breeding
> for body conformation, providing
> cross-breeding animals for first
> calf heifers, occasionally raising
> roping stock, and raising low
> cholesterol & low fat beef.
> Longhorn steers are also used for
> show, riding, and parade events
> since they are easily trained.

> Other Longhorn "after
> market" products include
> skulls and horns mounts, colorful
> hides, hoof/scrotum/tail mounted
> ornaments.

> Finally, since Longhorns are sole
> "each" rather than
> "by the pound," they
> command high prices (often in the
> thousands of $$). Top end sires
> and dams are often sold at
> specialty auctions for tens of
> thousands of dollars. Longhorn
> semen often sells between $10 and
> $300 per straw, depending on
> scarcity, pedigree, and other
> factors.

> Some individuals purchase
> Longhorns for personal pasture
> attractions; some businesses
> purchase them for front pasture
> ornaments to call attention to
> their corporate or industrial
> operation. A colorful and very
> long horned animal is "worth
> its weight in gold" so to
> speak for those
> "ornamental" purposes.
> Incidentally, the longest horned
> steer still alive is around
> 110" spread, tip to tip.
 
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Anonymous

>Something else to consider is that most people will breed the Longhorn earilier, that puts it one calf ahead of a beef cow. They also live and produce longer. I have a cow that is 18 and just had a healthy calf.

I am also suprised that this
> subject hasn't generated more
> discussion.

> I also feel that the market is
> limited when it comes to selling
> Longhorns. Seems you have to find
> just the right buyer and have the
> right bloodlines, or you may loose
> a lot of money.

> I know more about raising calves
> for beef than for horns or other
> traits.

> I was just curious as to what
> other cattleman think of
> Longhorns. As I said earlier, I'm
> only taking care of them, I don't
> have any money invested in the
> cows.



[email protected]
 
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A

Anonymous

& you have to consider how many cattle you want to raise.....it might be hard to find a market for 100 longhorn calves each year. or what kind of beating you're willing to take on the ones that don't sell for a couple thousand. we have used longhorn bulls on our heifers (for calving ease) in the past and have purchased 18 month old registered longhorn bulls for $500 (& this was from a reputable breeder who also sells out-of-state & at consignment sales) but these were bulls who weren't good enough to be sold as longhorn breeding stock but were fine for our purpose. Kind of brings down your averages when you feed some for 18 months & sell for $500.
 

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