inbreeding

Help Support CattleToday:

A

Anonymous

I have a unregistered heifer that I had bred, but I guess didn't take because a couple of weeks after bringing her home, she bred to my bull(her father). Is this something to wory about?
 

jfont

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2004
Messages
566
Reaction score
0
Location
south central louisiana
It's not something to brag about, but I wouldn't worry about it. The first inbred calf should be fine. Now if this calf happens to be a heifer and breeds back to her grandfather, you could start running into trouble. It's not a good practice, but things happen.
 

jcarkie

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 26, 2003
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
0
Location
arkansas
if you don't want the combination take her to the vet and get her a shot to get rid of the calf. i had one bred by the neighbors bull it cost me $20 to fix it. it was worth the money. they have to be between 3 weeks and 3 months bred.
 

cherokeeruby

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2004
Messages
1,161
Reaction score
0
Location
TEXAS of course
Is it OK to breed a bull to his granddam or great granddam? We have one cow line that if we get a bull out of will want to breed to everything.

TIA

jfont":3dp69rx8 said:
It's not something to brag about, but I wouldn't worry about it. The first inbred calf should be fine. Now if this calf happens to be a heifer and breeds back to her grandfather, you could start running into trouble. It's not a good practice, but things happen.
 

Jake

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 20, 2003
Messages
3,783
Reaction score
20
Location
North Central Kansas
We've done similiar to Cherokee and don't have any problems. The cows we've had problems with this [ast calving season are the charlois cows but that's because the bull was more worried about getting out and runnin the neighborhood than breedin cows. Most of the ones he ignored were the old and the heifers which were out of him.
 

sidney411

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 9, 2004
Messages
2,839
Reaction score
1
Location
South Central Texas
What is the difference in breeding to daughter but not grandaughter? Do you mean the "grandaughter" resulting from breeding the bull to his daughter and getting a heifer than breeding that heifer to the grandfather bull also? Would it be the same if you bred his daughter to another bull and breed the resulting granddaughter back to the mothers sire (grandfather bull)?
 

Larry Sansom

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 13, 2004
Messages
160
Reaction score
0
Location
Hartford KY
sidney411":oapvn7y7 said:
What is the difference in breeding to daughter but not grandaughter? Do you mean the "grandaughter" resulting from breeding the bull to his daughter and getting a heifer than breeding that heifer to the grandfather bull also? Would it be the same if you bred his daughter to another bull and breed the resulting granddaughter back to the mothers sire (grandfather bull)?
Suggest you get Jim Lent's book- The basis of Linebreeding- contact him at [email protected] The "rule" is to not have over 50% of any one animal in the pedigree - Example 50% sire- 50%Dam, the next generation the 4 animals are adding 25% each to the equation, then 12 1/2% .... Just add up the % each has and and you will see that an example of half brother to half sister mating is fine - and has been the success of many of the great bulls of most breeds - good example of this is EXT in the Angus. When the % goes over 50% - you can start to see problems. Line breeding is great - but it will bring out the problems as well as the goodness - so culling is Mandatory!! Jim's book starts out with a biblical example - really got my eyes opened after reading that book.
 

Matt

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2004
Messages
97
Reaction score
0
Location
Cayuga County NY
guest":16ftf1nw said:
I have a unregistered heifer that I had bred, but I guess didn't take because a couple of weeks after bringing her home, she bred to my bull(her father). Is this something to wory about?

You worry when it comes out with five legs and no head, lol. It happend to my father once the calf was fine.
 

redangus

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 8, 2004
Messages
347
Reaction score
0
Location
Arkansas
What I have always heard, if you have two good animals and the calf is what you want...it's called line breeding. If they are ugly and the calf is ugly, it's called inbreeding.
 

TXBobcat

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
782
Reaction score
0
Location
China Spring, TX
Larry Sansom":1guq8ljo said:
Suggest you get Jim Lent's book- The basis of Linebreeding- contact him at [email protected] The "rule" is to not have over 50% of any one animal in the pedigree - Example 50% sire- 50%Dam, the next generation the 4 animals are adding 25% each to the equation, then 12 1/2% .... Just add up the % each has and and you will see that an example of half brother to half sister mating is fine - and has been the success of many of the great bulls of most breeds - good example of this is EXT in the Angus. When the % goes over 50% - you can start to see problems. Line breeding is great - but it will bring out the problems as well as the goodness - so culling is Mandatory!! Jim's book starts out with a biblical example - really got my eyes opened after reading that book.

Guess I'm still a little confused on this one. When considering breeding two animals together, do you add the percentages in both animals together, and if comes to more than 50%, don't breed, or is it the amount each animal starts out with?

If you have 2 calves (1 bull, 1 hefier), both with same sire, and the bull calf bred the hefier, the resulting calf would still be 50% of the original sire - correct?
 

dun

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
47,334
Reaction score
1
Location
MO Ozarks
TXBobcat":2o0r9xr9 said:
Larry Sansom":2o0r9xr9 said:
Suggest you get Jim Lent's book- The basis of Linebreeding- contact him at [email protected] The "rule" is to not have over 50% of any one animal in the pedigree - Example 50% sire- 50%Dam, the next generation the 4 animals are adding 25% each to the equation, then 12 1/2% .... Just add up the % each has and and you will see that an example of half brother to half sister mating is fine - and has been the success of many of the great bulls of most breeds - good example of this is EXT in the Angus. When the % goes over 50% - you can start to see problems. Line breeding is great - but it will bring out the problems as well as the goodness - so culling is Mandatory!! Jim's book starts out with a biblical example - really got my eyes opened after reading that book.

Guess I'm still a little confused on this one. When considering breeding two animals together, do you add the percentages in both animals together, and if comes to more than 50%, don't breed, or is it the amount each animal starts out with?

If you have 2 calves (1 bull, 1 hefier), both with same sire, and the bull calf bred the hefier, the resulting calf would still be 50% of the original sire - correct?

Correct. The easy way is to divide the influence of each animal in the pedigree by half for for the dams side and the sires side, then add those percentages together.

dun
 

Latest posts

Top