Hoof and Mouth disease in Cattle

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Anonymous

Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>Thanks!
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Anonymous

Massive outbreak of Hoof and Mouth in England reported this morning. Thousands of animals being slaughtered and incinerated. Worst outbreak in over 20 years. I think that in following up this news that you will find more than you will need regarding this awful disease. <p>Ignore the people who don't appreciate the effort and the classes that you are taking. I applaud you for the choice of profession, and I wish you well.
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Anonymous

(User Above)":3g5kl1ox said:
: Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: Thanks!<p>
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Anonymous

(User Above)":itqfwh32 said:
: Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: Thanks!<p>
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Anonymous

Hi Amanda-Don't know if you will get this message, but i would like a copy of whatever you might care to share on your research. I am not in the science profession * i am a legal studies stdent* and an electrologist, but the study of microbiology is a hobby of mine. I can't seem to find any discussion as to what the exact bacteria is that caused hoof and mouth or the latin name. In addition, i have not been able to find info as to what happens upon human consumption of meat products contaminated w/the bacteria. please, i know as a grad student you are very busy, give me whatever info. you care to exchange. sorry i cannot contribute to your effors. Thanks Affinity. ps will exchange any legal or eletrology info you might desire. lol have a great day <p><br>: Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: Thanks!<p>
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Anonymous

(User Above)":1gqk1838 said:
: Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: Thanks!<p>
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Anonymous

(User Above)":24h9aqlo said:
: Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: Thanks!<p>
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Anonymous

How brave you are 'Bonnie' under the cloak of anonymity. Do you realize that you have exposed more about yourself in your rantings than the person you are trying to belittle ? Doesn't sound like you you should be telling anyone that they need help.
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Anonymous

(User Above)":3hbn7c9l said:
: Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: Thanks!<p>
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Anonymous

Hi<p>With reference to the recent outbreak in the UK of foot and mouth disease you might like to read my daily updates from England. These can be found at the link below.<p>Good luck<p>Jane
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<ul><li><a href="http://gouk.about.com">The UK for Visitors</a></ul>
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Anonymous

I send this in regard to your question about slaughter being the only treatment.<br>Deborah<p> Published on Sunday, March 4, 2001 in the Independent / UK<br> Foot & Mouth Crisis<br> To Be Killed for Having Flu Is As Sick As It<br> Gets<br> by Joan Smith<br> <br> Isn't it time somebody stood up for animals? Up and down the country, cows, pigs and<br> sheep with the equivalent of a heavy cold, and others without symptoms that have been in<br> contact with the affected animals, are being slaughtered and burned on ghastly funeral<br> pyres. We have all seen pictures of the sky glowing a baleful red, while yet more animal<br> carcasses are silhouetted starkly over the pits of death. Yet the whole business makes as<br> much sense, in everything but economic terms, as putting down an entire primary school<br> class because a few of the children happen to have sore throats. <p> Foot and mouth is not a fatal disease. When government ministers, farmers and vets prefer<br> to shoot thousands of animals rather than wait a few weeks for them to recover from an<br> illness that does not pose a threat to human health, it is clear that something has gone<br> hideously wrong with our relationship to the non-human world. In this case the cause is<br> money, the fact that most modern farms are run, despite subsidies, on a tight budget that<br> does not allow for looking after sick animals or a delay in the date when they can be sent<br> for slaughter. <p> Farmers would say, I suppose, that most of these creatures are destined for the abattoir<br> anyway, so the cull merely brings forward what is inevitable. But the same cannot be said of<br> feral animals, the deer, badgers and wild boar that may be hunted and shot as a<br> consequence of the outbreak. What angers many people I have talked to in the past week<br> is the way in which the photographs of burning carcasses symbolise the fact that farming is<br> an industry, and a ruthless one that cares very little for animal welfare. <p> And yes, I accept that most of us prefer not to know what goes on in slaughterhouses. One<br> of the effects of the crisis has been to make me think about returning to a vegetarian diet,<br> not out of concern for my own health but because of the horrors that modern farming<br> imposes on animals, and I doubt whether I am alone in this. It also signals the need for an<br> urgent reconsideration of our responsibilities towards the non-human world. In recent<br> months, largely as a result of the debate over hunting with hounds, we have been subjected<br> to a barrage of hostile propaganda about animals, from foxes to domestic cats. We are told<br> about the damage foxes do to pheasants and chickens, and the number of rodents and<br> birds killed by our moggies when they go hunting at night. <p> There is no moral equivalence here, as the American philosopher Lori Gruen has pointed<br> out: "It would be nonsensical to hold a lion morally responsible for the death of a gnu." (As I<br> once explained to Clarissa Dickson Wright, a keen supporter of hunting, I expect human<br> beings to have a more sophisticated grasp of moral responsibility than a fox.) <p> You and I may have a duty to reduce the opportunities for predation of our domestic pets,<br> as people already do by law in Western Australia, where a curfew operates and all cats<br> have to wear collars with bells. But the natural behaviour of animals, which lack the capacity<br> for moral choice, does not in any way justify our mistreatment of them in return. <p> If you insist on arguing that it does, by the way, you should logically accept that some<br> humans who cannot make moral judgements, patients in a persistent vegetative state or the<br> severely demented, do not have rights either – and, presumably, are free to be<br> experimented on for medical research. <p> Most people rightly find this kind of reasoning unacceptable, without recognising that we live<br> in a myopically anthropocentric culture. What I found astonishing about the Alder Hey organ<br> scandal was the assumption that tissue from dead humans is too precious to be used for<br> research, even to benefit people with debilitating diseases, while experiments on live<br> animals are perfectly OK. <p> All the evidence shows that the most destructive predator on earth is not the fox or the<br> domestic cat, nor even the tigers whose natural habitat shrinks alarmingly every year. It is<br> the human race, whose pitiless exploitation of other species diminishes our claim to belong<br> to a higher moral order. (Even other primates such as chimpanzees and bonobos, which<br> share almost 99 per cent of our genes, have not been spared.) <p> Only in a twisted universe would mildly sick farm animals find themselves rounded up for<br> premature slaughter, as is currently happening in Britain. That, rather than the economic<br> plight of farmers, is what the grim policy of mass destruction confirms to many of us today. <p> © 2001 Independent Digital (UK) Ltd.<p><br>
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Anonymous

(User Above)":3q6865cs said:
: Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: Thanks!<p>
<br>
<br><hr size=4 width=75%><p>


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A

Anonymous

(User Above)":2a9x2o59 said:
: Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: Thanks!<p>Amanada;<p>You're pretty stupid for a second year tech. The newspapers even tell about vaccines. Give it up; get a job at MacDonalds.<p>
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Anonymous

(User Above)":k1aatc8t said:
: Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: Thanks!<p>Amanda, Contact your state department of agriculture and ask for the vet in charge of infectious and contagious diseases. If this vet hasn't had any experience with hoof and mouth, he should be able to refer you to someone who has.<br>Good luck,honey and remember people who say and do ugly things always have ugly things happen to them.<br>
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Anonymous

(User Above)":1brxvzs2 said:
: : Please help me! I am a second year vet tech student doing an oral presentation on Hoof and Mouth Disease in Cattle for my large animal diseases class. I have found a few sources but need advice on where to find specific cases to liven up my presentation. I have all the basics; causes, vaccines, countries affected, etc.<br>: : Does it tend to affect a certain breed of cow? There is no other way to treat besides slaughter, correct? Any advice anyone would have would be GREATLY appreciated.<br>: : Thanks!<p>: Amanada;<p>: You're pretty stupid for a second year tech. The newspapers even tell about vaccines. Give it up; get a job at MacDonalds.<p>I think she's pretty smart for asking questions. You probably work at MacDonalds yourself<p>
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Anonymous

I would like to know if Hoof and Mouth Disease is airborne and if it is I THINK THE PEOPLE THAT ARE BURNING THE CATTLE INFECTED WITH IT ARE MAKING A BIG MISTAKE BECAUSE THEY ARE BREATHING IN THE FUMES AND PARTICLES EMITTED FROM THE CARCASSES OF THE INFECTED CATTLE.
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Anonymous

Can anyone tell me when hoof and mouth disease became foot and mouth disease, since all the animals that get it have cloven hoofs.
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