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heel pain

grannysoo

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Have you had the vet check it yet? :mrgreen: I'm sure that everyone here's going to be glad to play doctor on a patient that can talk for a change.

See anything on the outside? Have you bruised it? Bone spur?

A bruised heal hurts pretty bad....
 

GMN

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There is a small bump on the back of my heel, it was swollen but since I switched my shoes around it seems to have gone down, just wondering if anyone ever tried those ankle/heel support things.

I never had an issue with the Muck chore boots, but I think I may have gotten a defective or knock off pair, because everytime I wear them the one heel just aches, so I am also looking for a new option for boots in the barn too, if you all had any suggestions for that too?

Thanks

Gail
 

brandonm_13

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I'd say carry these back and get another pair. Can you feel anything down there with your hand? Maybe the rubber wasn 't formed quite right. I love my muck boots. Whole lot better than the cheapo boots.
 

Lammie

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If it won't go away, have it checked out for either a heel spur or a planter's wart. Both can be quite painful and the heel spur can get worse as time goes by.
 

Ryder

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Back of foot? I don't know.

Bottom of heel--could be plantar fasiculitus. ( I am not looking up correct spelling) Is it particlarly bad when you first get up in the morning? Treat with ice and stretching foot. More detail if requested.
 

dun

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Ryder":2y7mbb17 said:
Back of foot? I don't know.

Bottom of heel--could be plantar fasiculitus. ( I am not looking up correct spelling) Is it particlarly bad when you first get up in the morning? Treat with ice and stretching foot. More detail if requested.
And after that and physical therapy don;t work just get a shot of cortizone in it.
 

1982vett

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GMN, thanks for reminding me. Mine will probably be hurting again now that I have remembered it. So far I have just lived with it and learned to walk lightly on it. Good fitting shoes with a cushioned heel seem to help. Figured mine was a stone bruise (I remember when it happened) but after about 5 years I imagine it might be a bit more than that. One thing about it, if the heel is hurting I don't notice the bunion pain as much. :p Evidently it hasn't bothered me much lately because I have been able to forget that it hurts.
 

ffamom

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Most heel pain is caused by tight calf muscles. You can stretch it by placing your toes on a curb and then press your heels to the ground.
 

S&WSigma40VEShooter

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Probably got that plantar fascitis or whatever its called. My wife had it. She said it went away eventually when I just asked her what to do about it.
 

ga. prime

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I've had it at least twice for a period of several weeks over the last 40 years. Don't do anything and it will go away. I don't know about yours but I always suspected mine was caused by kicking stuff unnecessarily.
 

GMN

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Its gotten alot better, its right above the back of my heel off to the side just a bit, ice seemed to help, not sure what it is, but its getting better and definetely making my life easier for chores.

Thanks for the replies.

Gail
 

tncattle

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Don't know if this is exactly what it is but I've dealt with a similar problem for almost 10 years. I've been a consistent runner for almost 20 years now and developed knots where the achilles tendon attaches to my Calcaneous (heel). I don't think I spelled either of those words right but anyway, I personally wouldn't take any cortisone shots as they are only a temp. fix and will not heal the problem. Mine is helped by placing gel heel inserts in my shoes. I still run three times a week and have two heel inserts in each running shoe. I wonder if I'm in the minority as an avid runner on this board?
 

Ryder

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tncattle":u0en3jqx said:
. I still run three times a week and have two heel inserts in each running shoe. I wonder if I'm in the minority as an avid runner on this board?
I was ( a very slow one). Feet got to bothering me real bad and I had orthotic inserts made several years ago. They really helped a lot.
Now my back and hips are messed up. I can't even walk real good.
 

GMN

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Ryder":2injmvcc said:
tncattle":2injmvcc said:
. I still run three times a week and have two heel inserts in each running shoe. I wonder if I'm in the minority as an avid runner on this board?
I was ( a very slow one). Feet got to bothering me real bad and I had orthotic inserts made several years ago. They really helped a lot.
Now my back and hips are messed up. I can't even walk real good.

Isn't that just old age- ;-)
 

hillsdown

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I am wondering if is a stress fracture. I am thinking of all the time you spend in the milking parlor on a concrete floor. What kind of footwear do you wear GMN is it just rubber boots ? If it is I would look and getting some different footwear or even get soul inserts the gel inserts are really good as was mentioned.

I am a runner as well and I get stress fractures often , I have learned from painful experience to stop running until they fully heal. I find running outside on the soft ground isn't as hard on you as the treadmill. I have also learned that the proper footwear will make all the difference on your body from your feet all the way up.
 

GMN

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hillsdown":3rq2joxk said:
I am wondering if is a stress fracture. I am thinking of all the time you spend in the milking parlor on a concrete floor. What kind of footwear do you wear GMN is it just rubber boots ? If it is I would look and getting some different footwear or even get soul inserts the gel inserts are really good as was mentioned.

I am a runner as well and I get stress fractures often , I have learned from painful experience to stop running until they fully heal. I find running outside on the soft ground isn't as hard on you as the treadmill. I have also learned that the proper footwear will make all the difference on your body from your feet all the way up.

I had been wearing the Muck boots, never had an issue until recently, I did buy some gel inserts, but they only made it worse, so I switched to tennis shoes, and it seems to hurt less now. Been taking Motrin, and applying ice packs when I'm in the house, etc..What are the symptoms of a stress fracture?

GMN
 

hillsdown

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For some reason I have never found muck boots comfortable.

Here is the link as well. http://sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/foot ... /foot4.htm

A stress fracture is generally an overuse injury. It occurs when muscles become fatigued or overloaded and can not absorb the stress and shock and repeated impact. Fatigued muscles transfer that stress to the nearby bone and the result is a small crack or fracture, in the bone.
What Causes a Foot Stress Fracture
Stress fractures in the bones of the foot are usually caused by overtraining or overuse. They can also be caused by repeated pounding or impact on a hard surface, such as running of concrete. Increasing the time, type or intensity of exercise too rapidly is another cause of stress fractures to the feet, as is wearing improper footwear.
Women seem to be at greater risk of foot stress fractures than men. This may be related to a condition called "the female athlete triad," which is a combination of poor nutrition, eating disorders, and amenorrhea (infrequent menstrual cycle), that predispose women to early osteoporosis (thinning of the bones). The result of this decreased bone density is an increase in the risk of stress fractures.

High impact sports such as running, gymnastics, and volleyball can increase the risk of stress fractures. In all of these sports, the repetitive stress of the foot strike on a hard surface causes trauma and muscle fatigue. Without the right shoes, good muscle strength or adequate rest between workouts an athlete can develop a stress fracture.

Treating Stress Fractures of the Foot
The best treatment for a stress fracture is rest. Taking a break from from the routine and doing some low impact exercise for a few weeks (six to eight) can help the bone heal. If rest isn't taken, chronic problems such as larger, and more persistent stress fractures can develop. Re-injury may result in a chronic foot problem and the stress fracture might never heal properly.

Prevention

The following advice may protect you from devloping stress fractures in the first place:
Progress slowly in any sport. Gradually increase time, and intensity, running mileage or effort.
Eat well, and include calcium-rich foods in your diet, especially if you are a female athlete.
Use the proper foot wear and replace shoes when needed.
If pain or swelling begins, immediately stop the activity and rest for a few days.
If continued pain persists, see your physician.
Any foot pain that continues for more than one week should be seen by a doctor for a thorough evaluation and diagnosis
 

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