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Grass fed beef

Tod Dague

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Frankie":2273uad9 said:
You have to ask on these types of deals as to if they were fed grain or not. I know of some people that are advertising grass fed beef. The typical assumption is that the calf was finished on grass alone but they fed grains in a grass lot.
 

Frankie

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These people claim grass fed and finished. Beef two years in the making.

But they don't say where their ranch is and seem to be buying cattle to finish. If they can make it work, it might be an outlet for local producers.
 

OLF

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From the website, I don't think they feed any grain. They stress 'grass fed' and 'grass finished'. If they only said 'grass fed', that should mean that they were raised on grass for at least 85% of their life. Grass fed can still be finished on grain. I agree it can be misleading, but that is how it has been defined.
 

LimiMan

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OLF":3j2wvz0y said:
From the website, I don't think they feed any grain. They stress 'grass fed' and 'grass finished'. If they only said 'grass fed', that should mean that they were raised on grass for at least 85% of their life. Grass fed can still be finished on grain. I agree it can be misleading, but that is how it has been defined.

Its misleading because people keep circulating the wrong informaiton. If an animals is claimed to be grassfed, it can never have had any grain, Here is what the USDA says grassfed means:

Grass Fed Marketing Claim Standards

Claim and Standard:



Grass (Forage) Fed – Grass and forage shall be the feed source consumed for the lifetime of the ruminant animal, with the exception of milk consumed prior to weaning. The diet shall be derived solely from forage consisting of grass (annual and perennial), forbs (e.g., legumes, Brassica), browse, or cereal grain crops in the vegetative (pre-grain) state. Animals cannot be fed grain or grain byproducts and must have continuous access to pasture during the growing season. Hay, haylage, baleage, silage, crop residue without grain, and other roughage sources may also be included as acceptable feed sources. Routine mineral and vitamin supplementation may also be included in the feeding regimen. If incidental supplementation occurs due to inadvertent exposure to non-forage feedstuffs or to ensure the animal’s well being at all times during adverse environmental or physical conditions, the producer must fully document (e.g., receipts, ingredients, and tear tags) the supplementation that occurs including the amount, the frequency, and the supplements provided.
 

LimiMan

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OLF":sqgpt64b said:
From the website, I don't think they feed any grain. They stress 'grass fed' and 'grass finished'. If they only said 'grass fed', that should mean that they were raised on grass for at least 85% of their life. Grass fed can still be finished on grain. I agree it can be misleading, but that is how it has been defined.

Where did you get the "85% of their life" informations. Also, who has defined grassfed as the way you mentioned above?
 

tom4018

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LimiMan":3kb5k9i3 said:
OLF":3kb5k9i3 said:
From the website, I don't think they feed any grain. They stress 'grass fed' and 'grass finished'. If they only said 'grass fed', that should mean that they were raised on grass for at least 85% of their life. Grass fed can still be finished on grain. I agree it can be misleading, but that is how it has been defined.

Its misleading because people keep circulating the wrong informaiton. If an animals is claimed to be grassfed, it can never have had any grain, Here is what the USDA says grassfed means:

Grass Fed Marketing Claim Standards

Claim and Standard:



Grass (Forage) Fed – Grass and forage shall be the feed source consumed for the lifetime of the ruminant animal, with the exception of milk consumed prior to weaning. The diet shall be derived solely from forage consisting of grass (annual and perennial), forbs (e.g., legumes, Brassica), browse, or cereal grain crops in the vegetative (pre-grain) state. Animals cannot be fed grain or grain byproducts and must have continuous access to pasture during the growing season. Hay, haylage, baleage, silage, crop residue without grain, and other roughage sources may also be included as acceptable feed sources. Routine mineral and vitamin supplementation may also be included in the feeding regimen. If incidental supplementation occurs due to inadvertent exposure to non-forage feedstuffs or to ensure the animal’s well being at all times during adverse environmental or physical conditions, the producer must fully document (e.g., receipts, ingredients, and tear tags) the supplementation that occurs including the amount, the frequency, and the supplements provided.

That pretty well defines it.

A guy in this area that says he is grass fed would not qualify by those guidelines as I here he buys a lot of soyhulls, maybe all his cattle don't get it though.
 

novaman

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I dislike the paragraph that bashes feedlots in order to make their product seem superior. In an ideal world we would raise all cattle outside of feedlots. As was mentioned in the article, it is cheaper to raise cattle in a feedlot. The consumer has pushed for cheaper and cheaper product so in a sense they have brought about feedlots across the country. Taking cheap shots like this upsets me.
 

chippie

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I agree with novaman about the feedlot bashing.

I looked at the prices.

A share equals 1/4 of a beef in weight - or approximately 140#.

The price is $650.00 (or $4.62 per pound).

Honestly, in these tough economic times, how many people can spend that type of money on beef? More and more people are watching their pennies.
 

grubbie

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The appetite for beef in this country could not be satisfied without feedlots. I personally prefer grass fed beef, as long as it has enough fat. But I highly doubt that the folks badmouthing feedlots are going to do any damage to that industry. America loves it's beef!
 

spoon

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Frankie":c37y471o said:
These people claim grass fed and finished. Beef two years in the making.

But they don't say where their ranch is and seem to be buying cattle to finish. If they can make it work, it might be an outlet for local producers.

"Air M’hor is our small cattle ranch in southern Oklahoma in the Red River Valley of Oklahoma and Texas, a place we call Texoma – one of the best places to raise cattle in the country."
 

mnmtranching

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The words "finished cattle" can be whatever the producer thinks finished is. What is it? when a beef is 24 months old? To me grass fed is not finished as I know it. You take a 1300 pound 2 year old grass fed to the fat cattle market and a 14 month old 1300 pound grain finished, which do you think will bring the best $. No doubt and probably like $100-$200 more.
Remember, grass fed is what we import and grind. [Billions of pounds of it]
I think grass fed is fine, where there is demand for it and it should not bash traditional US fed beef production.
 

talldog

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LimiMan":1h0q2pro said:
OLF":1h0q2pro said:
From the website, I don't think they feed any grain. They stress 'grass fed' and 'grass finished'. If they only said 'grass fed', that should mean that they were raised on grass for at least 85% of their life. Grass fed can still be finished on grain. I agree it can be misleading, but that is how it has been defined.

Its misleading because people keep circulating the wrong informaiton. If an animals is claimed to be grassfed, it can never have had any grain, Here is what the USDA says grassfed means:

Grass Fed Marketing Claim Standards

Claim and Standard:



Grass (Forage) Fed – Grass and forage shall be the feed source consumed for the lifetime of the ruminant animal, with the exception of milk consumed prior to weaning. The diet shall be derived solely from forage consisting of grass (annual and perennial), forbs (e.g., legumes, Brassica), browse, or cereal grain crops in the vegetative (pre-grain) state. Animals cannot be fed grain or grain byproducts and must have continuous access to pasture during the growing season. Hay, haylage, baleage, silage, crop residue without grain, and other roughage sources may also be included as acceptable feed sources. Routine mineral and vitamin supplementation may also be included in the feeding regimen. If incidental supplementation occurs due to inadvertent exposure to non-forage feedstuffs or to ensure the animal’s well being at all times during adverse environmental or physical conditions, the producer must fully document (e.g., receipts, ingredients, and tear tags) the supplementation that occurs including the amount, the frequency, and the supplements provided.
Yes,Yes and Yes !! Grass fed Beef is for the clients that want it--Pure and simple !! :tiphat:
 

TexasBred

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tom4018":1hbja3q4 said:
LimiMan":1hbja3q4 said:
OLF":1hbja3q4 said:
From the website, I don't think they feed any grain. They stress 'grass fed' and 'grass finished'. If they only said 'grass fed', that should mean that they were raised on grass for at least 85% of their life. Grass fed can still be finished on grain. I agree it can be misleading, but that is how it has been defined.

Its misleading because people keep circulating the wrong informaiton. If an animals is claimed to be grassfed, it can never have had any grain, Here is what the USDA says grassfed means:

Grass Fed Marketing Claim Standards

Claim and Standard:



Grass (Forage) Fed – Grass and forage shall be the feed source consumed for the lifetime of the ruminant animal, with the exception of milk consumed prior to weaning. The diet shall be derived solely from forage consisting of grass (annual and perennial), forbs (e.g., legumes, Brassica), browse, or cereal grain crops in the vegetative (pre-grain) state. Animals cannot be fed grain or grain byproducts and must have continuous access to pasture during the growing season. Hay, haylage, baleage, silage, crop residue without grain, and other roughage sources may also be included as acceptable feed sources. Routine mineral and vitamin supplementation may also be included in the feeding regimen. If incidental supplementation occurs due to inadvertent exposure to non-forage feedstuffs or to ensure the animal’s well being at all times during adverse environmental or physical conditions, the producer must fully document (e.g., receipts, ingredients, and tear tags) the supplementation that occurs including the amount, the frequency, and the supplements provided.

That pretty well defines it.

A guy in this area that says he is grass fed would not qualify by those guidelines as I here he buys a lot of soyhulls, maybe all his cattle don't get it though.

Soyhulls are considered "roughage products" so would not be grain nor grain by-products.
 

Jogeephus

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mnmtranching":1lwrobxq said:
I think grass fed is fine, where there is demand for it and it should not bash traditional US fed beef production.

I agree. But if you read more of their stuff it sounds like you will never get e-coli from eating grass fed beef. Wonder what else it will do for you? Make you lose weight?

I don't understand why so many people feel they need to bash others so they can sell theirs. Seems to me that quality will always sell whether its grass fed or grain finished.
 

TexasBred

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Jogeephus":1j8h2egk said:
mnmtranching":1j8h2egk said:
I think grass fed is fine, where there is demand for it and it should not bash traditional US fed beef production.

I agree. But if you read more of their stuff it sounds like you will never get e-coli from eating grass fed beef. Wonder what else it will do for you? Make you lose weight?

I don't understand why so many people feel they need to bash others so they can sell theirs. Seems to me that quality will always sell whether its grass fed or grain finished.

Absolutely....in anything !!!!! Sell the good points on your product .... the other "product" will remove itself from the market.
 

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