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Electric Fence grounding

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nocows

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I have a question about grounding an electric fence charger I recently bought a Parmak 25 mile range solar charger. The instructions say to put 3 6' galvanized ground rods 10 foot apart. I have a standard 30 mile charger that's just using one ground rod and it seems to run just fine. Most setups I see around other farms are also only using 1 ground rod, so I guess my question is what's the downside of using 1 grounding rod vs the 3 like the instructions say? I'm just using this for one short run at the top of a fence to keep a bull in.
 

Philip-TX

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1 will work, 3 will work GOOD!

The better the grounding the better the ELECTRIC fence.
Current is looking for a path to ground.
 

shaz

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You may even get by with one 3ft aluminum rod. You really have to be able to measure it. Get a digital fence tester and measure from earth ground to your ground output on the charger. If that's less than 250v you're in good shape. No reason to put in a bunch of ground rods unless there's a problem.
 

Bigfoot

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keep your ground rod area moist. no need in over kill, just a good ground.
 

cowboy43

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I have grounded to a barb wire fence that has 2 inch pipe corners driven 5 feet in the ground with medal T-Post for line post.
 

kenny thomas

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Try this, totally ground out the fence with a t-post or piece of pipe. Go to the ground wire between the box and the ground rod. Test the voltage there. It will show it's feeding back. If you keep adding rods you will get the feedback down to 0. I am using 3 in the drip of the barn. I have seen one place that it took 5 rods to get it to 0.
 

wbvs58

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Under most conditions you get away with the one rod however when things get tough as in drought and dry spells is when you will appreciate doing it fright in the first place.

Ken
 
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nocows

nocows

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I went ahead and drove a 6' galvanized grounding rod although I hit a big rock about 4 ft down, I ran the wire and got the fence hooked up. It's working but I just don't know how good until I get a tester. I did watch the bull put his nose up to it and he figured out it was on. I Just want to make sure it's enough to make him not want to try it.
 

Hpacres440p

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I have grounded to a barb wire fence that has 2 inch pipe corners driven 5 feet in the ground with medal T-Post for line post.
I know this is an old thread, but we have a pipe fence, barbed wire and t-posts between the pipe. Want to run some temporary electric pasture dividers to rotate pastures, but would like to just move a solar charger with polytape from area to area. Can I use the current pipe fence as a ground, or do I need to put permanent ground rods everywhere I think I’m going to put the charger for new divisions?
 

Lee VanRoss

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The formula I use is one 8' ground rod per 2 to 3 joulues ... 6 to 8 foot apart Prefer 10 joules and up.
Rule #1 Never as in No Way ever let a wire down and encourage a cow to go over the wire "unless you
are training them to jump" Cut the wire if you must or get them to a gate. With the exception of 'sale barn'
stock, given adequate food and water they will most likely stay in even with a blown fuse or wire down.
Caveat "I realize there may be a cow who never read Rule # 1"
 

KAstocker

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I would guess the pipe fence would be enough if you're just energizing temporary wires. I think some solar chargers that are intended for strip grazing come with a short ground rod attached to the mounting post.
 

Jeanne - Simme Valley

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I'm sure others have had the same problem - snow!!!! - insulates the cattle's feet from being grounded. You would "logically" think - snow is water - they should REALLY be grounded. Nope - lots of air in the snow I guess. But, by the time snow is flying thick, all our young cattle have learned what that 1 strand is and don't mess with it. Even if the snow is deeper than the wire - they "know" where it is. Pretty amazing.
 

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