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drench moxidecton

steveaust

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how do i work out how often to use moxidecton base pour on drench on my steers.the maker would not commit in any way.i live in an area of low rainfall,sandy acidic soils and long hot summers.we keep our steers from age 4 days to 2 years and i have been drenching every 3 months or so,and now i am going broke on the cost of the drench.i have asked the locals about it and most dont drench at all.i hpoe this is the reason my cattle look better than theirs.
 
A

Anonymous

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Moxidectin pour on isn't made for drenching and has ingredients which are potentially harmful to the digestive tract on direct absorption. There are formulations specific for drenching for a reason. My best advice...don't do it, or if you do, prepare for illness or death.

V
 

Brett Enright

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Vicki he means a pour on drench, not one that you put in their mouth. This is one for worms etc but your pour it on their back. It is made to be a drench here in Australia. He just needs to know how often to drench them because the bottle doesn't say. :D

Brett.
 

Hawk

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I think that your terminology is confusing. To those of us in America anyway, a drench is something to administer orally. A pour-on is something you pour-on the cows back. These are separate and distinctly different products. There is no such thing as a pour-on drench. That is a contradiction in terms. It is one or the other; it can't be both a drench and a pour-on. You don't give a pour-on orally and you certainly wouldn't pour on a drench.
 

polledbull

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A good cattleman once told me you cant go broke worming cattle , He said he used pour on wormer . They had a very aggressive AI and ET program . He said every cow that went through the chute got wormed every time she went through it , cause you didnt know when she was going to be back in the chute again. He had a very nice herd of about 600 head of reg. Gelbveih cattle here in NC. His opinion I reckon on worming .
 

steveaust

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you are right vicky it doesnt say drench on the label so i cant claim aussie terminology this time,i will just go with stupid instead. :oops: stupid as i might be i had no intention of whacking it down their cake holes.i seem to think i will plod along as i am cause my critters look good.any advice on pour ons much appreciated :D
 

Bez

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Sounds to me like you need to get another type of pour on - one from a company that will support you.

Seems to me - if you are at least pertially set up for this - you could run a couple of your own test groups. Cut out a small representative sample of your main herd and put them in another area of your establishment for a year. Keep doing the same thing with your main herd, and cut the test group dosage in half / quarter - or what ever you think you might want to try. Keep a close watch and see if there is any noticeable difference - then compare the cost savings and so on. You might be very surprized at the results - conversely you might be disappointed - nothing ventured nothing gained. You may be in a situation where the only help you get is what you make for yourself!

If one of my suppliers gave me the run a round with a "do not want to commit" answer - I'd be looking for a replacement. Be that as it may you could even volunteer some of your animals for a field test. Had a neighbour who did that a few years ago for some type of "preventative". They had a veterinarian come out to the ranch and work with that specific group of cattle for a year - about 20 head if memory serves me correctly. The drug company paid the veterinarian bills. My neighbour and the veterinarian kept a complete set of records and such - I believe it was done as a field test on a parasite / de-worm drug.

Just my humble thoughts

Bez
 

steveaust

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Thanks Bez,I only raise around 20 steers at a time on our small place and iwas intending on cell grazing this year,so i think i will run them in 2 groups of 10 and do as you say with the pour on.I have lost my main source of income in the last week after finishing work in the local engineering workshop(sweatshop)This being the main reason i am counting my pennies.Lucky i bought all the milk powder i needed for the calves before being thrown on the scrap heap, :D
 

Running Arrow Bill

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We only use injectible de-wormers...spring and fall. Also, any new arrivals or any bulls returning from lease-out.

The injectibles work great and being systemic don't have to worry about the pour-ons washing off etc.

We use Dectomax(R), Ivomec(R) injectibles. These are "Ivomectrin" formulations. Probably other brands out there.
 

CattleAnnie

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We use Ivomec or Dectomax pour-ons in the fall. I won't be using any more Cydectin after receiving a bad batch one year. Gets very expensive when you're retreating animals.

Take care.
 

steveaust

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Cattle Annie ,did you test for egg count to establish you had a bad batch?
The only way i think a bloke like me would no i had a bad batch would be if my steers started loosing condition for no good reason.I reckon some shifty people out there might be tempted to water it down before they sold it :D
 

sidney411

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Hello

We have always used Invomec Plus Injectible, but it is pretty pricy. I had a friend suggest Levamisole injectible for calves at work up and for the cows every other time and Ivomec Plus Inj. for the cows the time we don't use the Levamisole. Have you looked into the cheaper versions of wormer for the steers you are running?

Someone also told me that you shouldn't use Levamisole on pregnant cows? Is this correct? What will it do?

Thanks
 

CattleAnnie

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Steve,
About 1/3 of the cattle were crawling with lice two months after being treated with Cydectin ( and being that our winters are so harsh you feel pretty sorry for an animal missing patches of much needed hair), so I called the clinic that I bought it from and let them know.

They offered to give enough to retreat the affected animals, but we just said to heck with that, (we had lost confidence in the product)and used Dectomax to clean them up.

Anyways, I'm sure that there's people that have had positve results using Cydectin, but after that little experience we won't be among that number any more.

Take care.
 

dun

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CattleAnnie":1x7t71a3 said:
Steve,
About 1/3 of the cattle were crawling with lice two months after being treated with Cydectin ( and being that our winters are so harsh you feel pretty sorry for an animal missing patches of much needed hair), so I called the clinic that I bought it from and let them know.

They offered to give enough to retreat the affected animals, but we just said to heck with that, (we had lost confidence in the product)and used Dectomax to clean them up.

Anyways, I'm sure that there's people that have had positve results using Cydectin, but after that little experience we won't be among that number any more.

Take care.

If you have lice it usually takes two treatments to get them unless what you use also affects the eggs.

dun
 

CattleAnnie

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Dun,
We treat all the cows in the fall once and never had to retreat such a large group of cattle in any other year except for that time we used Cydectin. Lice are common up here, as the moose and deer seem to pass it along to the cattle ie. rubbing on the bush, bales, etc. So it's not unheard of to have to retreat two or three by the end of winter. But it wasn't just the breds who were affected that time, also the bulls too, and they were penned in a different area seperate from the cows. Also the affected animals were patchy very early in the winter, which is also an oddity.

Another difference in pour ons is that some (now I can't remember which brands) have an oil base rather than a water base. I believe the Cydectin has a water base, and if the cows get snowed or rained on after you treat it doesn't tend to stay on them as well as the oil based ones. But the fall we used it, the cows' backs were dry the day we processed and pregged them, and we didn't get any precipitation for a couple of weeks after, so who knows what really went on with it...

I don't know if Dectomax is water based or not, would have to check one of the jugs, but I'm pretty sure that Ivomec is oil based. Anyone know for sure?

Take care.
 

CattleAnnie

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A very nice person who chose to remain anonymous was able to re-educate me about the pour ons. I appreciate the information because had honestly forgotten what they were based on. Guess it's time to start paying attention to those labels a little more often.

Anyway, thought I'd pass it along for those folks who may be interested.

"Annie, the Ivermectin pours that I have used are all alcohol-based. I've never used the Dectomax, but I assume that it is also alcohol-based because here in the States it has the same hazardous materials shipping charge as the Ivermectins. They only do that for the alcohol, I believe.

The Cydectin is the only oil-based one that I have used. Purple and smells like kerosene. We used it for a couple of years and they guarantee that it is rainproof, but as much as the stuff costs, who the Hell is gonna take a chance? We had great lice control out of it when we used it, but it costs too much to use if you're not happy with it, in my opinion."

Thanks again for sharing the above information.

Take care.
 

steveaust

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Cydectin-The label on my container says-Active ingredient moxidectin 5g/L and 150g/L hydrocarbon solvent, I would say that it was oil based because i dont think solvents will mix with water ie; gasoline(petrol).It also says it is not affected by extremes in climate ,but i know it :D does not get much below freezing in most of australia.I dont know what the other 80 percent of the container holds and they are not saying. :D
 

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