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AI question

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Anonymous

Guest
Standard practice is to see a cow in standing heat, wait twelve hours and then breed her, correct???? Well, then how come when I went out to breed her this evening, she didn't look in the back end like she was in heat at all... I massaged the vulva a bit and it was dark pink inside, but for the life of me, it didn't seem like she was in heat at all.... keeping in mind that I really am a beginner in AI.... where did I go wrong? or did I? What have I forgotten since last year?

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OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
What were you looking for when your examined the vulva of the cow, Omak?

> Standard practice is to see a cow
> in standing heat, wait twelve
> hours and then breed her,
> correct???? Well, then how come
> when I went out to breed her this
> evening, she didn't look in the
> back end like she was in heat at
> all... I massaged the vulva a bit
> and it was dark pink inside, but
> for the life of me, it didn't seem
> like she was in heat at all....
> keeping in mind that I really am a
> beginner in AI.... where did I go
> wrong? or did I? What have I
> forgotten since last year?
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Frequently when you AI a cow she is already out of standing heat, the mucus you expect to see is no longer present. Since you are by-passing the vagtina and the cervix and the sperm doeasn't have to make that trek to enter the vagina you are decreasing the amount of time required from insemintion to ovulation. Ovulation normally will occur about 8 hours of she leaves standing heat.

dunmovin farms

> Standard practice is to see a cow
> in standing heat, wait twelve
> hours and then breed her,
> correct???? Well, then how come
> when I went out to breed her this
> evening, she didn't look in the
> back end like she was in heat at
> all... I massaged the vulva a bit
> and it was dark pink inside, but
> for the life of me, it didn't seem
> like she was in heat at all....
> keeping in mind that I really am a
> beginner in AI.... where did I go
> wrong? or did I? What have I
> forgotten since last year?
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
I was expecting to see swollen lips, the opening slightly open, a slight push from my left arm should have spread the vulva open, I thought, and then the fluids that signaled heat should have been readily visible. I expected to see a lot more swelling than I did, I guess.

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OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Yesterday was extremely hot, so I waited until the evening started cooling before I did the AI-ing. She spent most of the day with another cow which was in heat -- they were sort of taking turns. I didn't see her actually lay down until about five pm -- still too hot, I thought. Does that sound like I was in the time frame of what you were describing?

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A

Anonymous

Guest
Unless you atually see one stand you can't really be sure if she is in standing heat or not. I'm no good at long range guessing. The best I can say is time will tell. Some non-standing, or even in heat cows, will fall in love, and try to ride one particular hot cow. We keep a heat chart, it gives us an idea of when who should or shouldn't be in heat. Look at "http://www.leblink.com/~dunmovin/heat-table.htm" and you'll get the idea. It's not 100% right, the blocks are larger and they are arranged 21 days on each line. We put the cows number in the block, top middle or bottom depending on when she is detected in heat. We do this long before breeding season, it helps us to predict who is coming in and who is in love. After breeding it also keeps us a ware of who should be coming in if she didn't take.

dunmovin farms

> Yesterday was extremely hot, so I
> waited until the evening started
> cooling before I did the AI-ing.
> She spent most of the day with
> another cow which was in heat --
> they were sort of taking turns. I
> didn't see her actually lay down
> until about five pm -- still too
> hot, I thought. Does that sound
> like I was in the time frame of
> what you were describing?
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
This year we have had in the most part weak heat signs, a few real strong ones. None of the girls have had any external discharge or even noticable interna discharge. However, if you've ever tried to slip the gun all the way to the cervix in a totally dry cow you can tell the difference between one tha has been in standing heat and a dry hole. You have to remember also, each cow is different and one year to the next, even one heat to the next may vary a little in their behaviour. Just like genetics, ain't cow breeding fun? Granted I'm a rookie at this, only been doing AI for 20 years or so, but this year has been the most difficult heat detection season I've ever had. Hopefully all the ladies took so I can quit worrying. Won't know for absolutely sure till fall when preg check time rolls around.

dunmovin farms

> I was expecting to see swollen
> lips, the opening slightly open, a
> slight push from my left arm
> should have spread the vulva open,
> I thought, and then the fluids
> that signaled heat should have
> been readily visible. I expected
> to see a lot more swelling than I
> did, I guess.
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Nope, I saw her in standing heat. I agree with the heat chart idea, and even went back to the cow's calving date to double check, but I did let down on keeping track between calving and AI-ing. I take a lot of kidding because I spend a lot of time watching rear ends, etc. I guess I won't let the joshing dictate how much attention I pay. According to the calving date, she was about ten days off... according to the activity in the field (and, since we were building fence I was with her most of the day) she was in heat, and standing heat that morning. Time will tell, and there will always be next third week, barring any delays, human error, communist intervention or acts of GOD..... lol ... I hate the wait, is all.

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A

Anonymous

Guest
At school, I am pretty sure that most of the cows we practiced on were "dry", but a year is a long time to try to remember what all went on there. I will be watching for the next 21 cycle. I don't know about preg checking... will wait for a few years until I have more than three head to worry about... or maybe, I will never get that far ahead... I just keep watching and waiting with sperm gun in hand. As far as genetics and cow behavior, heat detection being fun? Just one more piece of evidence that proves to me that I am NOT the one in charge! lol a most humbling experience.

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A

Anonymous

Guest
> lol ... I hate the wait, is all.

Boy, I know what you mean! I had my Jersey AI'd on the 6th, she was done 12 hours after coming into standing heat and was still standing, so hopefully she took. Anyway, should know in another couple of days -- no signs at all that she's coming in though, she normally gets real playful a few days beforehand.

Ann B
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
This wait is bad but the real killer is when you're waiting for them to calve. You know the day they're bred, you know the day they're due, but it seems like forever and your constantly thinking she may be early, then if she's late you keep wondering if she'll ever drop the darn thing. Trust me, they will, in their own sweet time.

dunmovin farms

> Boy, I know what you mean! I had
> my Jersey AI'd on the 6th, she was
> done 12 hours after coming into
> standing heat and was still
> standing, so hopefully she took.
> Anyway, should know in another
> couple of days -- no signs at all
> that she's coming in though, she
> normally gets real playful a few
> days beforehand.

> Ann B
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
That's the way my heifer was this year, when I bought her she was already bagging up, seller was convinced she'd go within 2 weeks tops. 5 weeks later she had the calf -- I was a nervous ninny by the time the calf made her appearance!

Ann B

> This wait is bad but the real
> killer is when you're waiting for
> them to calve. You know the day
> they're bred, you know the day
> they're due, but it seems like
> forever and your constantly
> thinking she may be early, then if
> she's late you keep wondering if
> she'll ever drop the darn thing.
> Trust me, they will, in their own
> sweet time.

> dunmovin farms
 
OP
A

Anonymous

Guest
Actually, this year has been the absolute best year in a long time. Always seem to have good strong heats, but this year didn't have any trouble with BUN (blood urea nitrate). Had one late 3 year old calve 5-17. On morning of 6-1 she had lost her K-Mar patch and had good clear discharge. 18 days later in standing heat so we bred her. If she settles, that will up her over 45 days. That would be super! I occasionally use K-Mar patches when I am looking for every "edge" possible. Usually, I just use the cattle marking crayons over their tail head. I use "Hot Pink" - shows up on all my different colored cows. Plus pretty appropriate - hot pink - get it!! Jeanne <A HREF="http://www.SimmeValley.com" TARGET="_blank">http://www.SimmeValley.com</A>
> This year we have had in the most
> part weak heat signs, a few real
> strong ones. None of the girls
> have had any external discharge or
> even noticable interna discharge.
> However, if you've ever tried to
> slip the gun all the way to the
> cervix in a totally dry cow you
> can tell the difference between
> one tha has been in standing heat
> and a dry hole. You have to
> remember also, each cow is
> different and one year to the
> next, even one heat to the next
> may vary a little in their
> behaviour. Just like genetics,
> ain't cow breeding fun? Granted
> I'm a rookie at this, only been
> doing AI for 20 years or so, but
> this year has been the most
> difficult heat detection season
> I've ever had. Hopefully all the
> ladies took so I can quit
> worrying. Won't know for
> absolutely sure till fall when
> preg check time rolls around.

> dunmovin farms

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