600# steer walking on eggshells

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bandit80

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When I sold my calves last week, I had one that I held back. He is a 600#+ steer that is walking very strange on his front legs. He acts as if it hurts to take a step, and appears to have a lot of flex in his front pasterns. He puts his feet down like he is walking on eggs and trying not to break them. He moves very slow, but eats/drinks fine. Nothing has been changed from his diet for 90 days or so, been getting a mixture of ground corn, soybean meal, ddg's, and a premix, as well as free choice brome hay.

My plan at this point is just to feed him out to butcher, rather than sell one single calf.

I haven't called the vet yet, as I am not overly concerned about his overall health. Anyone have any ideas?
 

larryshoat

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Sounds like he's foundered, more coomon in heifers in a feedlot situation than steers . He'll be good eatin .

Larry
 

hillsdown

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That is my first thought as well Larry, laminitis/founder. Is he hunched over though ? It could be hardware ,but if he is still eating well guess not.
 

angus9259

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Had that happen to a yearling bull but it wasn't founder (not saying either way on yours), but some kind of injury. I still don't know what happened but one minute he was fine, the next minute he'd gone through a gate, was in the wrong pen WITH the plastic feed bunk. The only way I can imagine the feed bunk got there was around a foot or his neck. Anyway, it was serious egg shells from then on out. I nick named him "preacher" because whenever he ate he knelt on his front knees. He'd hobble from place to place, but then would kneel when he got there. For a couple days he wouldn't eat at all so it sounds worse than yours.
 

4CTophand

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bandit80":abhv0v40 said:
When I sold my calves last week, I had one that I held back. He is a 600#+ steer that is walking very strange on his front legs. He acts as if it hurts to take a step, and appears to have a lot of flex in his front pasterns. He puts his feet down like he is walking on eggs and trying not to break them. He moves very slow, but eats/drinks fine. Nothing has been changed from his diet for 90 days or so, been getting a mixture of ground corn, soybean meal, ddg's, and a premix, as well as free choice brome hay.

My plan at this point is just to feed him out to butcher, rather than sell one single calf.

I haven't called the vet yet, as I am not overly concerned about his overall health. Anyone have any ideas?
I have seen calves on a high grain diet get feet problems because you over did it on the feeding -- check his feet --get a hoof pick and scrap away some of the bottom --- if indeed it is a foot problen associated with your feeding methods you will see the spots on the feet.

No cure for it as the damage has already been done--- but no problem he will survive to harvest day
 
OP
bandit80

bandit80

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Thanks for everyone's resonses. The steer is still walking funny, but continues to eat normally. He is getting 7.5 lbs of grain/day, and free choice hay. I wouldn't think that is enough of a grain ration to founder, but sounds like that's what it is. Was going to start increasing the feed on the butcher cattle, (he is with 3 other calves earmarked for the freezer) would yall wait a while or just increase the feed at a slower rate than normal.
 

angus9259

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bandit80":3p3yu5da said:
Thanks for everyone's resonses. The steer is still walking funny, but continues to eat normally. He is getting 7.5 lbs of grain/day, and free choice hay. I wouldn't think that is enough of a grain ration to founder, but sounds like that's what it is. Was going to start increasing the feed on the butcher cattle, (he is with 3 other calves earmarked for the freezer) would yall wait a while or just increase the feed at a slower rate than normal.

Not having had the problem, my response is not to be trusted. That said, I'd feed him like any other.

It seems to me though that if he foundered on 7.5 lbs of grain he's extra sensitive for some reason. But, if he keeps eating with the others and his gut doesn't go sour feed him out or grind him for burger now. There's only so much baby sitting a guy can do and if he's really going to be that sensitive I wonder if you'll ever really be able to fatten him right anyway. Again, this response is based on no experience and isn't to be trusted.
 

ChrisB

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In my experience the worse the feet get (or maybe the heavier the steer gets) the less time they will want to spend on their feet which meens less time at the feed bunk. Once he gets to an acceptable size go ahead and buther him, it will take what seems like forever to put on that last 150 pounds to finish out.
 

mwj

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bandit80":3unkfx0d said:
Thanks for everyone's resonses. The steer is still walking funny, but continues to eat normally. He is getting 7.5 lbs of grain/day, and free choice hay. I wouldn't think that is enough of a grain ration to founder, but sounds like that's what it is. Was going to start increasing the feed on the butcher cattle, (he is with 3 other calves earmarked for the freezer) would yall wait a while or just increase the feed at a slower rate than normal.

It is never safe to presume that all animals in a group consume the same amount. I would speculate that some of the group sold were not consuming there 7.5 lbs. per day. ;-)
 

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