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What Continental breed is the best?

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lms0229

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In your opinion what Continental breed is the best in the following:

1. Marbling

2. Tenderness

3. Flavor


Any studies done to support your answers? Also.... where are the studies on less known breeds as a basis for comparison to the most common breeds we have here in the US? Like your Romagnola, Bazadaise, etc.... how do we know what breeds score the highest if we haven’t researched ALL the breeds for carcass quality? Just curious your thoughts on the subject.

Thanks!
 

holm25

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Imho Simmis are one of the best breeds a guy could get :D
 

Son of Butch

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lms0229":3glwke75 said:
In your opinion what Continental breed is the best in the following:

1. Marbling

2. Tenderness

3. Flavor
Blonde d'Aquitaine seem to be favored by French chefs and given France's reputation for food, a strong endorsement. But that doesn't mean they would be profitable in the usa.

At the end of the 19th century Galloway was judged more flavorful than Black Angus.
Being equal in number at that time in the USA Galloway were expected to play a major role in our beef supply.
But Angus adaptability and fertility = profit and left Galloway in the dust to just being another minor breed.



Any studies done to support your answers?
The real world market place is the best study experience.

Also.... how do we know what breeds score the highest if we haven’t researched ALL the breeds for carcass quality?
Man has been conducting research by eating beef for thousands of years. No need to reinvent the wheel.
Unless you want to develop a niche market to exploit, the market place has spoken as to what is most profitable.
Profitability is what works in the real world and adaptability and fertility is what has been proven to rule profit.

I know it's not the answer to your questions, but it seems to me growing what works best in your part of the world
is always the right answer.
 

cattleman99

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The fall run of sales has started and so far the Fullblood Fleckvieh cattle have been outselling the Reds and black Simmental on average in Manitoba. 90 per cent or more going into good commercial herds too. Guys are paying $4-5k Canadian for good Fleck Breds. Consumers are speaking loud and clear. Simmental run the show here. Angus and Charolais fight over the rest. :banana:
 

Lucky_P

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They all bring something to the table. Marbling and tenderness is as variable WITHIN a breed as it is ACROSS different breeds.
We've had Simmental & Fleckvieh influence in our herd since 1983 or so.
But... I like Braunvieh and Pinzgauer... currently breeding some cows to Braunvieh sires, and have a handful of Braunvieh-cross heifers coming on.
Would be breeding some to Pinzgauer, too - if I knew the buyers wouldn't steal my steers, marking them off as Longhorn crosses. Had a couple of PZ-cross cows back in the early 90s that were danged good... but that line has petered out here.

Look here: http://www.cabpartners.com/articles/new ... rbling.pdf
 

BRYANT

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Lucky_P":14mjcz5f said:
They all bring something to the table. Marbling and tenderness is as variable WITHIN a breed as it is ACROSS different breeds.
We've had Simmental & Fleckvieh influence in our herd since 1983 or so.
But... I like Braunvieh and Pinzgauer... currently breeding some cows to Braunvieh sires, and have a handful of Braunvieh-cross heifers coming on.
Would be breeding some to Pinzgauer, too - if I knew the buyers wouldn't steal my steers, marking them off as Longhorn crosses. Had a couple of PZ-cross cows back in the early 90s that were danged good... but that line has petered out here.

Look here: http://www.cabpartners.com/articles/new ... rbling.pdf
I seen some black heifers selling this week then they ran a black heifer in that looked as good as they were, probably came with them, same size and all BUT she had a white tail from about 6'' up her hip down to the bush of her tail , tail not even full white. cost the seller almost .30 per pound. just thought that was interesting from what you just said.
 

elkwc

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BRYANT":ktpbzblq said:
Lucky_P":ktpbzblq said:
They all bring something to the table. Marbling and tenderness is as variable WITHIN a breed as it is ACROSS different breeds.
We've had Simmental & Fleckvieh influence in our herd since 1983 or so.
But... I like Braunvieh and Pinzgauer... currently breeding some cows to Braunvieh sires, and have a handful of Braunvieh-cross heifers coming on.
Would be breeding some to Pinzgauer, too - if I knew the buyers wouldn't steal my steers, marking them off as Longhorn crosses. Had a couple of PZ-cross cows back in the early 90s that were danged good... but that line has petered out here.

Look here: http://www.cabpartners.com/articles/new ... rbling.pdf
I seen some black heifers selling this week then they ran a black heifer in that looked as good as they were, probably came with them, same size and all BUT she had a white tail from about 6'' up her hip down to the bush of her tail , tail not even full white. cost the seller almost .30 per pound. just thought that was interesting from what you just said.

I see the same thing here. Any marking that indicates simmie or anything gets cut off and docked. Those with the simmie strip on their face do also. A Hereford bkack baldie will top the market.
 
OP
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lms0229

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I know people have been judging beef for a long time but I feel the beef is only as good as what I tell you “the public”... if I convince you the public that black angus is the best then it means that it is the best right? But do you really know? I think the answer grows fuzzy in that manner. Black angus lacks juiceness in one study that I read the other day, but the one with the best flavor and juice wasn’t an angus... the public has been convinced that marbling equals quality, but we all know that there is so much more to it. People like what they can see...so to judge meat based on marbling makes sense to the public, but it doesn’t necessarily correlate to better taste. Not saying I’m right, but it appears that way to me, the newbie. Lol
 

Muddy

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elkwc":13klkv08 said:
BRYANT":13klkv08 said:
Lucky_P":13klkv08 said:
They all bring something to the table. Marbling and tenderness is as variable WITHIN a breed as it is ACROSS different breeds.
We've had Simmental & Fleckvieh influence in our herd since 1983 or so.
But... I like Braunvieh and Pinzgauer... currently breeding some cows to Braunvieh sires, and have a handful of Braunvieh-cross heifers coming on.
Would be breeding some to Pinzgauer, too - if I knew the buyers wouldn't steal my steers, marking them off as Longhorn crosses. Had a couple of PZ-cross cows back in the early 90s that were danged good... but that line has petered out here.

Look here: http://www.cabpartners.com/articles/new ... rbling.pdf
I seen some black heifers selling this week then they ran a black heifer in that looked as good as they were, probably came with them, same size and all BUT she had a white tail from about 6'' up her hip down to the bush of her tail , tail not even full white. cost the seller almost .30 per pound. just thought that was interesting from what you just said.

I see the same thing here. Any marking that indicates simmie or anything gets cut off and docked. Those with the simmie strip on their face do also. A Hereford bkack baldie will top the market.
A skunktail isn't Simmental chrome, Sherlock. Most times it's usually a Longhorn cross which is more common than pinzgauer cross. The black skunktails are docked heavily than the Simmie calves in my area.
 

plumber_greg

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lms0229":2w8p8w50 said:
I know people have been judging beef for a long time but I feel the beef is only as good as what I tell you “the public”... if I convince you the public that black angus is the best then it means that it is the best right? But do you really know? I think the answer grows fuzzy in that manner. Black angus lacks juiceness in one study that I read the other day, but the one with the best flavor and juice wasn’t an angus... the public has been convinced that marbling equals quality, but we all know that there is so much more to it. People like what they can see...so to judge meat based on marbling makes sense to the public, but it doesn’t necessarily correlate to better taste. Not saying I’m right, but it appears that way to me, the newbie. Lol
I don't know that the public is so much convinced, as we, the producers are. gs
 

elkwc

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Muddy":334lq5zl said:
elkwc":334lq5zl said:
BRYANT":334lq5zl said:
I seen some black heifers selling this week then they ran a black heifer in that looked as good as they were, probably came with them, same size and all BUT she had a white tail from about 6'' up her hip down to the bush of her tail , tail not even full white. cost the seller almost .30 per pound. just thought that was interesting from what you just said.

I see the same thing here. Any marking that indicates simmie or anything gets cut off and docked. Those with the simmie strip on their face do also. A Hereford bkack baldie will top the market.
A skunktail isn't Simmental chrome, Sherlock. Most times it's usually a Longhorn cross which is more common than pinzgauer cross. The black skunktails are docked heavily than the Simmie calves in my area.

Sherlock if your reading apprehension was any good you would of seen I said simmie or anything. Guess I should of said anything else. Our neighbor that was using the black simmie bull got some with a lot of white on them. On the cow side there hasn't been anything used on them in the last at least 50 years but Angus except of one Char bull and his calves were docked and now the Black Simmie. I didn't mean that the Simmies had skunk tails but they have white elsewhere that indicates a cross and likely a Simmie cross. Like I've stated the only cross that doesn't get docked around here is a Hereford/Angus black baldie and they will top the market. The Simmies here are docked as much as a good Hereford steer. A good Hereford heifer will sell good as many buy them for replacements to breed to their Angus bulls.
 

skeeter swatter

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skeeter swatter":3426rdsq said:
Sales consistently.


Now I'll sit back and wait for the SIMMER pimps. :pop: :clap: :pop:

Sorry, meant Salers. As stated there is often as much or more difference within breeds as between breeds.
 

Lazy M

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I believe the op asked exclusively about continental breeds, and was concerned most with carcass traits. With that criteria my vote would be sim followed closely by lim with gelbvieh being a distant third. I wouldn't have a salers on my farm as I've learned that they are often demon spawn.
 

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I have avoided weighing in because I've not had time to give the responder a just response.

I'll say, after having just returned from delivering heifers and a bull to Colorado and getting ready to deliver cows and heifers to Iowa, and being pre-sold-out on our beg production for the next two years due to the quality of the beef we produce, I liked Aubrac cattle.

Handsome to look at, hardy, easy fleshing, maternal and tasty. High yield with the right kind of tender muscle fibers.

I really like raising something different than everyone be else. Having a different story helps with marketing, too.
 

polledbull

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Limousin is a good choice for contenetial , they will yield good, and convert feed as good as any, they are easing calving and are fast growing
 

elkwc

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I will add that IMO many times the dock has little to do with quality but more with the buyers dock them because they can.
 

Son of Butch

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lms0229":3sfalyat said:
In your opinion what Continental breed is the best in the following:

1. Marbling

2. Tenderness

3. Flavor
1993 study - Sire group average for carcass traits by breed.

Marbling Score
1. Charolais 523
2. Salers 515
3. Simmental 510
4. Gelbvieh 507
5. Maine Anjou 501
6. Limousin 477
7. Chianina 448
* In a separate 1994 study Pinzgauer scored 516 marbling and placed highest in flavor by judging panel.
1993 study did not include Pinzgauer or measure tenderness or flavor.

1993 - Retail Yield
1. Chianina 71.9%
2. Limousin 71.5%
3. 5 way TIE 70.1% Charolais, Gelbvieh, Simmental, Maine Anjou and Salers

2005 Tenderness study
Angus 4.0 shear force
Hereford 4.1
Charolais 4.3
Limousin 4.3
Simmental 4.3
Gelbvieh 4.5
Slightly Tough = 5.0
Brahman 5.9


Off Topic: while searching for studies stumbled across a 2003 study A.I. sires vs Natural service sires
Conclusion: In 2003 A.I. calves were $25 more valuable at weaning than same breed Natural Service.
 

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