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Wagyu Hereford Cross

HerefordSire

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Anybody have Wagyu crossing experience? Anybody have Wagyu freezer beef experience?

In America, Japanese wagyu cattle were bred to Angus cattle to create a crossbred animal that would be more able to survive the U.S. climate and ranching methods. This crossbreed has been named American Style Kobe Beef and was originally produced for export to Japan but is now available world-wide.

Designed to mimic the diet that Japanese cattle were receiving, wagyu cattle in the United States are fed a mixture of corn, alfalfa, barley and wheat straw.

As of 2007 the U.S. cannot ship wagyu beef to Japan as Japan requires that beef imported from the U.S. be from cattle not older than 20 months (wagyu cattle are usually slaughtered at 30–35 months).[3]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagyu


At $100 for a 16-ounce porterhouse steak, Wagyu beef might be a hard sell. Evan Lobel, of famous New York butcher shop Lobel's, is undaunted.

He's already selling at least 100 of his beyond-prime porterhouses each month, plus 150 or more bone-in strip steaks starting at $89 a pound, 100 bone-in hip steaks and so on — well over $55,000 worth of meat — to a star-studded roster of clients.

"It's probably the most expensive Wagyu out there," says Lobel by phone as he stands in the icebox of his family's shop. "But we're going to give people the most extraordinary product."

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/5963343

 

RanchManager

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I would like to throw that on the grill. When I see a steak that looks to have enough IMF to run my diesel tractors, it makes my mouth water. I'm sure plenty will disagree, but I've just decided what to eat for dinner. Thanks.
 

RD-Sam

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We just had a discussion about this recently, look back a week or two.
 
A

Anonymous

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I'm not a fan of Wagyu's, but....

YUM! That steak is making me hungry!
 

HerefordSire

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RanchManager":1jup2q7i said:
I would like to throw that on the grill. When I see a steak that looks to have enough IMF to run my diesel tractors, it makes my mouth water. I'm sure plenty will disagree, but I've just decided what to eat for dinner. Thanks.


Welcome. I agree. I would be scared to eat something that high of quality. Would rather have the cash than the taste.
 

HerefordSire

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Here is an example of the market value for a Wagyu bull...

Full Blood Registered Wagyu Bull for Sale
-Born October 2006
-Gene Star tested
-Quality Grade: 6-Stars
-Tenderness: 3-Stars
-Feed Efficiency: 7-Stars

Price: $4,500

...and another wanting hetero polled...

Wanted: A Registered 7/8 smooth polled heifer


If there is no polled purebred registry, maybe we can create a herdbook after locating mutant polled Wagyu descending from horned offspring like the great Gammon.
 

HerefordSire

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This report is dated almost 7 years ago:

Interpretive Summary:
Reproduction rate and maternal performance are important components of efficiency of beef production. This reprot presents results for postweaning growth, puberty traits, reproduction rates, and maternal performance at young ages (2, 3 and 4 years of age) of F1 cross females produced from matings to a diverse sample of sire breeds, including the two most prominent breeds in U.S. beef production (Hereford and Angus), three breeds used in European milk and meat production systems (non Holstein influenced Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, and Friesian), and the Wagyu breed reputed to have unusual propensity to deposit marbling in Japanese beef production systems. Heifers by sire breeds that have had history of selection for milk production under dual purpose dairy-beef production systems (Norwegian Red, Swedish Red and White, and Friesian) expressed puberty at significantly younger ages than those by sire breeds that have not been selected directly for milk production. However, differences among sire breeds of F1 females were not significant for pregnancy rates at 18 months or for calf crop percentages born and weaned at two years of age. Differences among sire breeds were not significant for calving difficulty at 2 years of age or at 3 or 4 years of age. Weaning weights were heaviest for progeny of F1 cross females with Norwegian Red and Swedish Red and White sires, followed in order by progeny of F1 cross females with Friesian, Angus, Hereford, and Wagyu sires.

Technical Abstract:
Data were analyzed for reproduction and maternal performance of F1 females by Hereford (32 sires), Angus (30), Norwegian Red (14 non-Holstein influenced), Swedish Red and White (16 non-Holstein), Friesian (24 non-Holstein), and Wagyu (19) sires and Hereford, Angus, and composite MARC III dams. Effects of sire breed were significant (P<.05) for weights of the females at 400 and 550 days, for height at 18 months, for percentage expressing a pubertal estrus, and age at puberty. The females were mated to MARC III sires to produce their first calves at 2 years of age and to Charolais sires to produce calves at 3 or 4 years of age. Sire breed of the F1 females was significant for progeny weights at birth and weaning, but not for calving rates, weaning rates, dystocia scores, or unassisted births in either age grouping.

https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publi ... 48478&pf=1
 

HerefordSire

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Might as well cross reds with reds, namely Red Wagyu, or Akaushi ...

Today, there are four breeds of Wagyu cattle, the Akaushi (Japanese Brown, Kumamoto, Japan or Red Wagyu, in the United States), Black Wagyu (Japanese Black in Japan and Black Wagyu in the United States), Japanese Polled, and Japanese Shorthorn. A small number of Aberdeen Angus, Hereford and Charolais have been integrated into the beef breeds of Japan as well.

A new breed in the Western Hemisphere is Akaushi, also known as Japanese Brown and Red Wagyu in Japan and the United States, respectively. In 1976 two Akaushi bulls were introduced into the United States. Then in 1994, as a result of the trade act between the United States and Japan, a small nucleolus of eleven Akaushi cows and three Akaushi bulls were brought to the United States for their genetic ability to produce highly palatable beef containing extremely high amounts of intramuscular fat or marbling. Today, Akaushi genetics are controlled by a group of Texans under the name HeartBrand Beef, Inc., located in Yoakum, Texas.

The degree of intramuscular-lipid deposition in muscles is one of the main factors that influence the organoleptic properties of beef. Therefore, it is important to understand and evaluate the factors affecting the lipid quantity and composition in bovine muscle and adipose tissue. Under normal fattening conditions, the lipid deposition in muscles increases with age or animal growth and it is difficult to modify via dietary manipulation. In addition, it is reported that lipid deposition is affected by the degree of fattening and breed. Thus, modification of fatty acids by selecting breeding may be more effective.

Akaushi naturally contains intense intramuscular fat and it is well disseminated within the muscle structure and the majority of its meat grades out at two to three levels above USDA prime plus under the present south-central Texas management and feeding system. Its abundant marbling, unique fatty acid composition, finer and longer fiber structure and high water binding capability are the most important attributes that contribute to its exceptional tenderness, flavor and juiciness and product consistency. In addition, Akaushi beef is healthier than most other beef from domestic sources due to their ability to accumulate tissue with significantly higher ratios of Monounsaturated (MUFA) to Saturated (SAT) fatty acids and a high content of Oleic acid. Several clinical studies show that consumption of higher levels of MUFAs, in conjunction with reduced levels of saturated fatty acids lowers levels of undesirable low-density lipoprotein (LDL) blood cholesterol without decreasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol or increasing triglycerides, thereby, having a beneficial effect on the risk of coronary heart disease. In addition, resent studies in the United States indicate that intake of MUFAs and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk.

WARNING...pdf download
http://animalscience.tamu.edu/symposium/proceedings.pdf
 

HerefordSire

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I am @ latitude 33 degrees in Arkansas...notice where the latitude is in Japan.

In 1994 due to a loophole in the trade Act of 1992 between the United States and Japan, a small nucleus of Akaushi cows and bulls were brought to the United States in a specially equipped Boeing 747. Today, Akaushi genetics are controlled by a group of Texans under the name HeartBrand Beef, Inc.

Akaushi cattle, a Bos Taurus type of cattle had their origin and evolution in Kumamoto, Japan. Kumamoto is located in the middle of Kyushu island at a latitude of 32 degrees, 48 minutes North and 130 degrees, 42 minutes East, in the northwest part of the Kumamoto Prefecture.

Cattle breeds are divided into two kinds in Japan. The first is dairy cattle, including mainly Holsteins, grade Holsteins and Jerseys. The second type of cattle are nearly all called Wagyu. The word Wagyu refers to all Japanese cattle by its direct translation of its two grammatical parts, "wa" and "gyu" meaning Japanese and cattle, respectively. The Wagyu cattle are the Japanese indigenous breeds, which have been subjected to genetic improvement over the last 90 years. Today, there are four breeds of Wagyu cattle, the Akaushi (Japanese Red), the Kryoshi (Japanese Black), the Japanese Polled, and the Japanese Shorthorn. It is estimated at the present time that a population of 58, 263 breeding age females represents the Akaushi breed.



http://www.heartbrandbeef.com/?page=shop/history
 

HerefordSire

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I located an excellent article. Notice the $25 semen price and all the restrictions.

Perhaps of more interest to South Texas cattlemen is the introduction of an F-1 terminal breeding program, where the rancher uses fullblood Akaushi semen provided by HeartBrand on his commercial cows.

Calles said HeartBrand has been testing this concept for a few years, and what they have found is that the F-1 generation produced in the cross will grade 70 percent or better choice—every time—using any type of commercial cows.

That number is backed up by Dr. Charles Graham, DVM, owner of the feedlot that feeds out the cattle.

"We’ve been involved in it since 1997-98," the owner of Graham Land & Cattle Company said. "The cattle grade and yield are just phenomenal. We didn’t broadcast it or anything until we could get the numbers up so we could document it out and get some research and proof and paper and back it up. It was for real, it wasn’t a fluke."

HeartBrand is now working with a select number of commercial cattlemen on the program. Those cattlemen buy the semen for $25 a straw. They are also paid a premium for the calves, whom they have to sell back to HeartBrand. In return, they must sign an agreement that allows HeartBrand access to all data on the calves; access to all data on the mama cows that will produce the F-1s; access to all health-related matters on the nucleus of cows prior to the artificial insemination; and an agreement that the Akaushi semen will not be sold elsewhere.

Information will be provided back to the producer as to what individual cows produced to aid in genetic selection over time.

"It’s a very simple concept," Calles said. "It is for people who are willing to share the company’s philosophy of producing high quality beef going all the way to the marketplace."

As numbers of the F-1 calves continue to build and the program gains popularity, Calles said HeartBrand will look at establishing a branded program under a different name especially for this beef.

"Every single restaurant that we sell the high-end Akaushi meat, they have another classification called Certified Angus Beef," Calles said. "And this F-1 will feed into this market as well within the same restaurant for the steaks. We will guarantee the steaks."

Like old Vindicator in The Rare Breed, whose calves dotted the countryside the spring after his death caused by a harsh Texas winter, HeartBrand investors have high hopes Akaushi-sired calves will change the beef industry in Texas.

http://www.txfb.org/NewsManager/templat ... &zoneid=49
 

Busterz

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It sounds like they are using angus as a cross if they can also sell them as certified angus.

Why hereford, why not cross them with something like a Braunvieh with a faster growth rate and decent carcass characteristcs? The rate of growth (or time to finish) seems to be the major hinderance of these high grading cattle.

That cow looks like a limousin.
 

HerefordSire

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Busterz":er8k53s9 said:
It sounds like they are using angus as a cross if they can also sell them as certified angus.

Why hereford, why not cross them with something like a Braunvieh with a faster growth rate and decent carcass characteristcs? The rate of growth (or time to finish) seems to be the major hinderance of these high grading cattle.

That cow looks like a limousin.

I am considering a Hereford Wagyu cross because I own Herefords, which happen to be very fast growers. However, I guess I should be more open minded about other breeds to cross with Wagyu. Herefords do look like a dying breed to me. It appears Angus and Hereford can become obsolete in the next decade or two. I don't think they can sell them as CAB but they can sell them as a competitor grading higher. The American Kobe reportedly blows the CAB out of the water for rich clientele. I would be happy to sell high (F1 Kobe) quality meat out of my own processing plant to compete with lower line products like CAB and CHB.
 

andybob

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Herefordsire, when I visited Briggs Genetics in Texas 5 years ago, they were still doing the Wagyu/Tuli cross to build up F1 female numbers. From what I remember, the F2 Wagyu could be sold as Kobe beef, the F1 steers were sold through the usual channels, most going as CAB. It might help to contact the breeder offering the bulls for sale to clarify what percentage qualifies as Kobe beef.
 

HerefordSire

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andybob":2bp5dogs said:
Herefordsire, when I visited Briggs Genetics in Texas 5 years ago, they were still doing the Wagyu/Tuli cross to build up F1 female numbers. From what I remember, the F2 Wagyu could be sold as Kobe beef, the F1 steers were sold through the usual channels, most going as CAB. It might help to contact the breeder offering the bulls for sale to clarify what percentage qualifies as Kobe beef.

TY. Very interesting andybob!

As shown on their website...


Wagyu/Tuli cross 3 in 1 cows
74 head 4-6 yo fl Wagyu/Tuli cows 3 to 6 mo. calves on side and bred back to fullblood Wagyu bulls.
3750 per 3 in 1 package

Wagyu Semen
Full blood = $ 25/straw 0-75 & $20/straw 76 or more
Purebred = $17.50/straw 0-75 & $15/straw 76 or more

Wagyu Embryos
Full blood = $500/embryo
Purebred = $350/embryo

Additional Products
1. Weaned calves 7 9 months old, ready for feed yard, 75-99.8% Wagyu= $1500
2. Fed out calves ready for processing Approx. 1100 lbs. = $3500

http://briggsranchgenetics.com/forsale.html
 

smnherf

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Morgan ranch in NE has done a lot of the Hereford Wagyu cross. They run Herefords and Wagyu seperately too. I was at their place in 2007 at the NE hereford tour and seen both. They run their own international branded beef program. They could give you a very good rundown on the cross and the differences in cutability too.

Their website is: http://www.morganranchinc.com/
 

HerefordSire

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smnherf":3bi32mvm said:
Morgan ranch in NE has done a lot of the Hereford Wagyu cross. They run Herefords and Wagyu seperately too. I was at their place in 2007 at the NE hereford tour and seen both. They run their own international branded beef program. They could give you a very good rundown on the cross and the differences in cutability too.

Their website is: http://www.morganranchinc.com/

TY smnherf! Just what I was looking for!

As shown on their website....



Wall Street Journal Puts Morgan Ranch Wagyu To The (Taste) Test.

Do Wagyu Beef steaks live up to the hype? The Wall Street Journal’s Charles Passy published the results of his taste test in a May 18 article – Summer Grilling: Tasting Big-Ticket Beef. Morgan Ranch Wagyu Beef came out on top – named “Best Value” for its “rich, full flavor.”

Flattering to be sure for the fourth-generation, family-owned and run ranch situated in the picturesque Nebraska Sandhills. One of the first U.S. producers of this remarkable beef, Morgan Ranch has been building its faithful following of world-famous chefs, aficionados and even plain, ordinary folks -- literally by word of mouth.

“Our business has grown by more than 300% in the last three years alone,” said Dan Morgan.

A look at their online store will tell you why. The selections not only support the Morgan Ranch reputation for great beef flavor and buttery, melt-in-your-mouth tenderness. They also reveal a very practical understanding of its customers – with unique cuts for its gourmet market and restaurateurs, as well as executive assortments and even its family-style BBQ Pack.

http://www.morganranchinc.com/3376.htm
 
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