trimming feet

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Anonymous

i went for years never having to trim a foot.. now i have 3 cows that need it... 2 of them got it last year for the first time..

would some of you with experience with this answer a couple of questions for me?

1- will this be a continual thing now that they have started?

2- describe how you trim them... the hooves on the back feet are trying to cross each other and it seems that a lot is needed to be cut off... but this will cause lots of bleeding... am i going about this wrong or missing something here?

this is just one of those things i have been fortunate with in the past not to have to deal with...

thanks in advance

gene



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OP
A

Anonymous

You don;t want to trim so much that you get much if any) bleeding. If they're that bad, you will need to trim them a little at a time to get them back right. Genetics, walking conditions, amount of walking, injury, over feeding hot rations, all contribute to bad feet.

dun

> i went for years never having to
> trim a foot.. now i have 3 cows
> that need it... 2 of them got it
> last year for the first time..

> would some of you with experience
> with this answer a couple of
> questions for me?

> 1- will this be a continual thing
> now that they have started?

> 2- describe how you trim them...
> the hooves on the back feet are
> trying to cross each other and it
> seems that a lot is needed to be
> cut off... but this will cause
> lots of bleeding... am i going
> about this wrong or missing
> something here?

> this is just one of those things i
> have been fortunate with in the
> past not to have to deal with...

> thanks in advance

> gene
 
OP
A

Anonymous

> i went for years never having to
> trim a foot.. now i have 3 cows
> that need it... 2 of them got it
> last year for the first time..

> would some of you with experience
> with this answer a couple of
> questions for me?

> 1- will this be a continual thing
> now that they have started?

> 2- describe how you trim them...
> the hooves on the back feet are
> trying to cross each other and it
> seems that a lot is needed to be
> cut off... but this will cause
> lots of bleeding... am i going
> about this wrong or missing
> something here?

> this is just one of those things i
> have been fortunate with in the
> past not to have to deal with...

> thanks in advance

> gene You really shouldn't have to trim feet. There is often a problem in that bloodline. I've done it twice a long time ago. Once you start it appears it is a recurring problem.Put your animals in a rough rocky paddock if you have one. Often it is too much grain in their feed or they are being run in a soft paddock. i got rid of the need for hoof trimming by getting rid of the offending animals. Saved me time and money in the long run.



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OP
A

Anonymous

What it sounds like you have is Screw claw.

This is a genbetic characteristic, and will be passed on to most but not all offspring.

Treat as needed, trim to the quick, until you see a bloodline, but do not draw blood, a little blood is ok, it is a long way from the heart, and does generealy stop eventually HA HA, but seriously this will bring the animal into a more normal tracking, helping to imprive their ability to forrage and keep up with the herd.

We have soft loamy sand, and have to trim most of our cattle annualy or bi-annually, just because they are at a good plain of nutrition, not because they are deffective, but because our ranch does not facilitate hoof wear even if I were to exercise them.

A good trimmer will know exactly how far to trim their feet, and have a hydrolic flip table, grinder, nippers, hoof knife and toppical treatment such as tinkture of iodine or coppertox to treat the inter digital space and sole of the toes.

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