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Transporting Calf

A

Anonymous

Guest
I recently posted regarding the blind calf. He's doing great. Eats some grain and hay now along with bottle. I need to transport him to California in two weeks. He's going to live at The Gentle Barn and will be the guest of honor June 22. My question is regarding transporting him. I am worried about the stress of the trip and the heat. He will be in a horse trailer with adequate ventilation from the top. The back end is closed. I will try to travel as much at night as possible. It is a 12 hour trip from New Mexico to Tarzana, California. Are there any cooling devices I could use in the trailer? Would using ice help? I am really worried about the stress on him. My vet here said pneumonia is a risk. How could he get pneumonia?

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A

Anonymous

Guest
I'm glad you found a good home for your calf.

How could he get pneumonia? When cattle are transported, they become stressed, which can cause their immune system to not function as well as it normally would. Often people and animals are carrying around bacteria or viruses that don't bother them as long as they are strong and well and not stressed. These bugs are opportunistic. If the body they are living in/on becomes stressed, the bugs can start multiplying and cause illness.

I wouldn't use ice with the calf. Traveling at night is good, as you'll be crossing some really hot country. Bed the trailer deeply with straw, so the calf can lie down and feel secure.

Try to keep him hydrated. When you stop for a break, you might offer him some water. He should settle down pretty quickly, but if he tends to stand a lot, he'll get tired from the motion of the trailer. After a couple of hours of travel, most cows just lie down and rest, especially if they have lots of straw and good footing.

On arrival, he should be separated from the rest of the animals for 30 days, for his protection and for theirs. Once he settles in and a month or so has passed, he can be exposed to the other animals as long as he and they are well.

Be sure you get your health certificate and any other papers you will need for the border crossing. Your vet can set the paperwork up for you. Allow enough time for any lab tests that might be required.

> I recently posted regarding the
> blind calf. He's doing great. Eats
> some grain and hay now along with
> bottle. I need to transport him to
> California in two weeks. He's
> going to live at The Gentle Barn
> and will be the guest of honor
> June 22. My question is regarding
> transporting him. I am worried
> about the stress of the trip and
> the heat. He will be in a horse
> trailer with adequate ventilation
> from the top. The back end is
> closed. I will try to travel as
> much at night as possible. It is a
> 12 hour trip from New Mexico to
> Tarzana, California. Are there any
> cooling devices I could use in the
> trailer? Would using ice help? I
> am really worried about the stress
> on him. My vet here said pneumonia
> is a risk. How could he get
> pneumonia?
 
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