Safe anti-inflammatory for long term use?

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Keren

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Just wondering if anyone knows of an anti-inflammatory which is safe to use over a long period of time.

I have a doe who looks like she may need to spend a significant amount of time on an anti-inflammatory. She's currently on the Australian version of Banamine (Flunixil) but, the thing about that is it can cause vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, loss of appetite, stomach ulcers and kidney impairment when used long term. Consequently my vet is reluctant to put her on Banamine long term, and due to the nature of this problem the only other option is euthanasia, which I do NOT want to do because she's a bleeding good doe, she's my best doe (of course!) and a highly decorated show winner, plus she has some emotion wrapped up in her as well because she is the first registered doe I got, my first champion etc. as well as having survived a nasty caesarian last year.

So I wondered if anyone knows of some alternatives that are a little safer?
 

hillsdown

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What anti inflammatories do you have available in your country ?

I am asking because some are not approved for use in different countries..
 
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Keren

Keren

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thanks dun :D

hills, I wouldnt know off the top of my head because my dealing with anti-inflammatories has been very limited, I've only used Flunixil/Banamine a couple times.

But if you have any suggestions I can check into them ... I'm open to anything and everything at the moment since the only alternative is euthanasia and I really dont want to have to do that
 
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Keren

Keren

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Interesting case actually, Knersie.

I noticed her lethargic and off her feed, and soon established that she was having trouble passing urine (only managing to get a couple drops out). Took her to the vet and they took urine samples for analysis, and at that stage thought it was one of three things: 1) a urinary tract infection, 2) a urinary tract infection that has spread to the kidneys or 3) an adhesion from the caesarian which has moved the bladder from its normal position to a more caudal position, which predisposes it to infection.

The next day I was back at the vet as she was just about dead, and heaving and straining constantly (as if she were trying to give birth). The preliminary results came back from the lab and showed no growth ... basically no infection. Which isnt good, because infection would have been simple to treat. Our next thought was a stone, so we ultrasounded the bladder, but couldnt see any stones.

We decided to catheterise her, to at least drain the bladder and avoid rupture. Well, that was when we discovered what we were dealing with. We couldnt get a catheter in her at all, even a tiny tiny tom cat one about the size of a 19g needle. It would go about an inch in, then hit something solid and bend.

Basically, we are looking at a physical constriction of the urethra, most likely caused by scar tissue which has developed from the caesarian (which was 6 mths ago, she also had a uterine and vaginal tear during that kidding). We got hold of some goat specialists at Sydney University, they said the position of the constriction means that surgery is impossible. The only thing to try was an anti-inflammatory.

Well, the anti-inflammatory is working wonders, she pees about 75% normal, and eats and is generally very happy whilst on it. She had four day of it, and the hope was that after she was taken off it, the urethra would stay open. But, that doesnt appear to be the case. Approximately 36 hrs off the banamine/flunixil and she is rapidly heading downhill again.

So the options we are thinking at the moment are:

1) Keep her on banamine/flunixil (not good due to the stomach ulcer/kidney failure deal)
2) Take her off banamine/flunixil (not good because she will rupture the bladder)
3) Find an alternative anti-inflammatory which is safe for long term use (which is proving difficult)
4) Euthanase

She's a difficult one, alright. We nearly went ahead and euthanased after we couldnt pass the catheter, but I wasnt ready to let her go yet, and was desperate to try whatever we could. Its going to make it that much harder for me now if I still have to euthanase, because I know she is a relatively normal, healthy goat while on the flunixil. Its easier to euthanase a suffering, sick animal than one that is happy and interacting with you.
 

larryshoat

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Keren, in my opinion dexamethasone is another option. Maybe so many days on so many off and alternate between the two .

Larry
 

Angus Cowman

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Keren
I am not trying to be mean but you are keeping her alive and prolonging her suffering to appease your own feelings if you would step back and take the emotions out of the picture I think you would see that euthanasia is the best option with the money and time you are gonna spend and prabably wind up at that decision I would probably do it sooner than later
 

KNERSIE

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Angus Cowman":1yotd8yj said:
Keren
I am not trying to be mean but you are keeping her alive and prolonging her suffering to appease your own feelings if you would step back and take the emotions out of the picture I think you would see that euthanasia is the best option with the money and time you are gonna spend and prabably wind up at that decision I would probably do it sooner than later

Keren I feel truly sorry for you, but I think you know that Angus Cowman is right.
 

dun

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KNERSIE":1ikher5w said:
Angus Cowman":1ikher5w said:
Keren
I am not trying to be mean but you are keeping her alive and prolonging her suffering to appease your own feelings if you would step back and take the emotions out of the picture I think you would see that euthanasia is the best option with the money and time you are gonna spend and prabably wind up at that decision I would probably do it sooner than later

Keren I feel truly sorry for you, but I think you know that Angus Cowman is right.

Ads me to that list. Ask yourself what is the purpose in keeping her alive (and suffering/ in discomfort), then go from there.
 

hillsdown

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If you try aspirin you are to give it for 3 days and off for 2 days..

What about prednisone ? Ask you vet about that it is relatively safe for a short long term use if given in small doses ..Usually for long term it is a low dose every second day..But even then there are still side effects as with any anti inflammatory.

Good luck I know you hate giving up on them especially since this doe has been through so much ..
 

Workinonit Farm

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Aspirin, Dex, and Predisone/Prednisalone are good possible alternatives. While I have no experience using these drugs on a goat, I have experience with their use on a horse and 2 ponies.

The horse, currently one of the ones on the farm where I work, is and has been on a low-dose of aspirin given daily for 2 years now. The purpose in her case is for 'prevention' of 'flare-ups' of uveitis and has worked very well with no ill side effects.

The Dexamethasone was given to a pony I once had for treatment of COPD (reduces inflammation in the lungs). It worked well.....for a while. While she experienced no ill effects from the Dex, she did eventually need to be euthanized.

Prednisone/Prednisilone, was a pony that was in my care. She was on it for 3 years for treatment of COPD. She eventually died of old age.

I have no idea how these drugs would work for your goat and her condition.

I understand the deal about it being difficult to put them down when they are otherwise healthy. I had a perfectly healthy in every way, wonderfully temperamented cow that broke her left rear leg. That was probably the most difficult time I had putting one down.

The decision is yours to make. Good luck.

Katherine
 
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Keren

Keren

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thanks to everyone, both good and bad opinions

she doesnt suffer at all while on the drug - I've just been outside doing fences with her tagging along helping me, munching on grass and running around and kicking her feet up like a little kid. she feels so good she came into season the other day, and was tarting up and down parading along the buck fence. that is why I am reluctant to euthanase, because I know she can be normal while on the drug, and I can see the potential if only I can find another drug that will do the same, while being safer. money and time is not an issue with this animal

We have a re-evaluation scheduled for Saturday morning, and will discuss aspirin, dex and prednisone as possible options with my vet and the goat specialist. We might decide to try the other drugs, or we might decide to euthanase. Not sure yet.
 
A

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Hi Keren

So sorry to hear- I undertsand where you are coming from- sometimes sentimentality and emotion overcome practicality. Been there, done that, got the T-shirt. 8)

Have you tried/discussed Tolfedine? It really is a wonder drug, but you would have to discuss its long term use with the vet. We have used it in cattle for a period of a couple of weeks with no problems (the instructions say not to use it beyond 48 hours- I think), but have been warned it can lead to liver damage. Provided you use it sparingly I think this would be a good option. It does last a fair while and when injected, works reasonably quickly.

Otherwise, have you looked into any herbal/alternative treatments? Some of these really do work- you just need to give them a try. I saved one of my horses with a natural remedy after forking out a lot of money on vet visits and keeping her at the vet- 2 days after coming home (because the vet had tried anything and everything), on Mum's treatment, she was well on her way to recovery.

Good luck with it all. I hope you find a treatment that works.
 

msscamp

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Angus Cowman":1ijcglfe said:
Keren
I am not trying to be mean but you are keeping her alive and prolonging her suffering to appease your own feelings if you would step back and take the emotions out of the picture I think you would see that euthanasia is the best option with the money and time you are gonna spend and prabably wind up at that decision I would probably do it sooner than later

I'm really sorry that you are in this position, Keren, but Angus Cowman is right. You know you are going to ultimately have to euthanize her, so why put her through all of this?
 
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Keren

Keren

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msscamp":1mnsy33l said:
Angus Cowman":1mnsy33l said:
Keren
I am not trying to be mean but you are keeping her alive and prolonging her suffering to appease your own feelings if you would step back and take the emotions out of the picture I think you would see that euthanasia is the best option with the money and time you are gonna spend and prabably wind up at that decision I would probably do it sooner than later

I'm really sorry that you are in this position, Keren, but Angus Cowman is right. You know you are going to ultimately have to euthanize her, so why put her through all of this?

Thought I explained that earlier ...

she doesnt suffer at all while on the drug - I've just been outside doing fences with her tagging along helping me, munching on grass and running around and kicking her feet up like a little kid. she feels so good she came into season the other day, and was tarting up and down parading along the buck fence. that is why I am reluctant to euthanase, because I know she can be normal while on the drug, and I can see the potential if only I can find another drug that will do the same, while being safer. money and time is not an issue with this animal
 

msscamp

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Keren":3aq5i5cc said:
msscamp":3aq5i5cc said:
Angus Cowman":3aq5i5cc said:
Keren
I am not trying to be mean but you are keeping her alive and prolonging her suffering to appease your own feelings if you would step back and take the emotions out of the picture I think you would see that euthanasia is the best option with the money and time you are gonna spend and prabably wind up at that decision I would probably do it sooner than later

I'm really sorry that you are in this position, Keren, but Angus Cowman is right. You know you are going to ultimately have to euthanize her, so why put her through all of this?

Thought I explained that earlier ...

she doesnt suffer at all while on the drug - I've just been outside doing fences with her tagging along helping me, munching on grass and running around and kicking her feet up like a little kid. she feels so good she came into season the other day, and was tarting up and down parading along the buck fence. that is why I am reluctant to euthanase, because I know she can be normal while on the drug, and I can see the potential if only I can find another drug that will do the same, while being safer. money and time is not an issue with this animal

Whatever you think. Sounds to me like you've already made up your mind, so why did you even bother posting this question? There is no safe long term anti-inflammatory - I know it and so do you - even aspirin has the potential to tear their stomach up with long term usage. All drugs have side-effects when it comes to long-term usage, it's a simple matter of what you're willing to risk putting your animal through.
 
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Keren

Keren

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msscamp, with all due respect I know this animal better than you, and I will say it again, she doesnt suffer any pain while on the drug.

msscamp":3fe8isxe said:
There is no safe long term anti-inflammatory - I know it and so do you

Actually, I DIDNT know much at all about anti-inflammatories, which is why I posed the question :? I thought that someone may have had experience with long term use in companion animals such as horses, dogs or cats, I have not made my mind up, I am exploring all possible options.
 

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